Tag Archives: tips

Everything & Nothing: Sharing Music During COVID

By Becky St. Clair

Alice Walker once said, “Whenever you are creating beauty around you, you are restoring your own soul.” 

Over the past several months we have watched the world come alive with art. Musicians on balconies, serenading their neighbors; artists creating on their walls at home and sharing it via timelapse on YouTube; influencers using their writing skills to encourage, uplift, and inspire. It’s the arts that got the world through quarantine. The arts restored people’s souls. And PUC’s department of music could do no less for its students.

It didn’t take long after everyone went home to wait out COVID-19 for reality to hit: We missed music. Spring quarter is generally the busiest for the department, and 2020 was no different. However, the “busy” looked very different. Like every other campus department, the music department scrambled to make sure all of its courses were available and viable online, that students could access everything they needed to, and that effective learning was still taking place. 

Once those logistical details were ironed out, the question remained: How will we make and share music this quarter?

Music is more than just a discipline. It’s more than a major or a college department or background to a movie or a road trip. Music is a community. It’s a lifeline. It’s an expression of heart and soul. And we needed all of that more than ever during spring 2020. 

Like many others across the disciplines, our gazes turned toward Zoom. Deciding we had nothing to lose, we figured, Why not?! And on the evening of Wednesday, June 3, the music faculty and staff gathered on Zoom with a few community attendees and several music majors for our first-ever virtual General Student Recital. 

Between the six pieces performed that night viewers enjoyed the (sometimes somewhat garbled) sounds of piano, voice, violin, and viola. 

“I didn’t think it was possible to do a recital over Zoom,” admits Asher Raboy, acting chair and resident artist in the department of music. “And yet, it was a lovely evening. I felt so much joy seeing our students perform, and I sense they had a similar experience. I am so glad we did it.”

Natalie Fode, 2020 nursing graduate, and senior piano major performed Debussy’s “Clair de Lune” from her empty church in Yountville, California, where her husband is a pastor.

“I really enjoyed getting to do our GSR this quarter, despite the odd circumstances,” she says. “It gave me something to practice for and kept me motivated. Seeing and hearing my friends play was so special; they are truly wonderful musicians.”

Fode’s performance was gorgeous, and just the right speed for a contemplative and peaceful piece like “Clair de Lune.”

Her favorite part of the recital?

“Definitely when Lewis’ little niece sang along with him!”

Lewis Govea, a junior voice major in the pre-pharmacy program, sang from his home in Southern California. What no one saw coming was the adorableness of his nearly two-years-old niece stealing the show by standing right in front of the camera during Lewis’ performance, and trying to sing like her uncle. Lewis held it together, though, and finished strong with his Italian and French pieces. 

Michael Siahaan, voice major, presented two pieces, one live and one pre-recorded, the former a classic vocal performance piece in Italian and the latter a fun and familiar tune from the 1950s musical, My Fair Lady

James Woodward, senior violin and viola major, also presented two compositions, one Schubert, one Vivaldi. His live solo performance was beautiful and well-executed, despite his camera slipping while he played. Quickly setting it back up during a pause in the music, Woodward carried on like any great musician would.

The point was not that it was perfect. Because it couldn’t be. “Perfect” would have been in person, live, applause echoing throughout Paulin Recital Hall, and we all would have enjoyed Ghirardelli brownies and sparkling punch after the show. “Perfect” would have been together.

The point was that we made and shared music, we saw each other’s faces, and we reminded ourselves of what it is we truly love about our music, our community, and our department. 

So, in reality, maybe it was “perfect” after all. 

Govea shared his own feelings about the recital, and, honestly, he says it best, so I’ll let him close this post. 

GSR was, in short, everything I needed, but nothing I wanted. I wanted to sing in a big wide open space. I wanted to bow to the masses. I wanted to have a real accompanist. I wanted the nightmare of separation to be over. What I got was family. I got a reminder that I still had my community. I got a wake-up call. 

GSR this quarter was an outpouring of virtual yet tangible love and support. I got to see my music family play and sing like nothing was wrong. We got the opportunity to do things we never thought we would have to do. I got to sing for people who literally were only there to listen and support and encourage. 

The reality of GSR is nothing compared to what it meant for me as a musician. GSR was a success, and not just because my one-year-old niece had her debut performance, but because it stripped the music down to what it was intended to do: be a beacon for those who listen and love.

Stay in tune with the department of music by signing up for their monthly e-newsletter. Email music@puc.edu to be added to the list.)

 

Faces of PUC: Audrey Uyemura 

Audrey Uyemura is a senior from Loma Linda majoring in early childhood education. She’s also pre-occupational therapy. Despite an obviously busy schedule,  Audrey was kind enough to sit down and answer a few questions! 

What is your dream job? 

I want to be an occupational therapist. It is similar to physical therapy, but it focuses more on helping people learn or re-learn to do daily tasks. More specifically I want to work with children in the school system. 

How does that compare to what you wanted to be when you were young? 

When I was younger, I wanted to be a chef. I still love cooking, but as I got older I felt like it was more of a hobby. It was more fun for me to cook as a way to relax rather than a job. 

 What is your favorite thing about being a part of the Pioneers family? 

The best thing about being a part of the Pioneers family is the sense of community we have on campus. PUC has some of the best people and anywhere you walk on campus, you will always see a friendly face. 

Where is your favorite place in the world? 

Probably Hawaii. I just love the sun, beach, and humidity. A lot of people don’t like humidity, but I love it.  

What show are you bingeing these days? 

Well, it’s not really a show, but I’m a huge Star Wars nerd and love re-watching those movies, so I am currently making my way through those again. 

What is something you’re passionate about? 

I am passionate about working with children, especially those with special needs or disabilities. This is what really drew me to occupational therapy in the first place because I saw how these children’s lives were changing for the better with this help. Something about being around them is so inspiring to me. 

Recommend a place to go in the Bay Area on a weekend 

Honestly, I find myself going to Santa Rosa a lot. Being in Angwin on the hill, I feel like Santa Rosa is one of the closest places you can go to that feels like more of a typical city.  

 

Prep For Finals: Eight Tips

By Ally Romanes

The time has come! Finals are just around the corner. You might already be stressing trying to complete your projects and find enough time to study. But because we care, here are eight simple tips to help you prep for and crush your finals. 

Make A Study Plan

Before you start studying for your finals, make a plan to get organized. Think about which classes might be the hardest, that’s a great place to begin. Making a plan can help you keep track of your time so you don’t run out! 

Study Early

Get a head start on studying so you don’t feel overwhelmed and rushed during the weekend before finals or during finals week. Studying early will also help you remember the information you studied, which can lead to less time studying for that exam the week of finals. The earlier you study, the more confident you will feel taking the exam. 

Get Creative

If you use notecards or print out your notes, get creative by color-coding. Use colored pens or sharpies to write your notes and highlight important information. Color-coding your notes can stimulate your memory to remember what you’ve been studying. It will also be easier for you to find a certain answer or subject you want to look back and review, plus, it’s fun!

Study Notes

Always have your notes out and ready. If you need to go back and organize your notes, do it. Having your notes organized will make it so much easier for you to study. Also, check your teachers lecture slides if you missed a class or see if they uploaded a practice exam. 

Study Outloud

Reading your notes out loud can help you remember the information that you’ve studied. By talking through your material and thinking about facts and formulas out loud can help you retain information. 

Quiz Yourself

Quiz yourself over the information you already studied. Quizzing yourself can help you remember the things that you’ve studied and can help you remember the information. Ask your friends or your parents to quiz you too. 

Form A Study Group

Gather some classmates and form a study group. Studying with others can motivate you and help you learn better. By comparing notes, working through tough questions, and reviewing class material together, everyone can help each other succeed. 

Take Care of Yourself

Above all else, you have to make sure you are taking care of yourself. The pressure doing well can feel like a lot, but not getting enough sleep is much worse! Make sleep a priority. Your mind needs rest, just like you. 

Studying takes a lot out of you, so make sure you take short breaks. Grab something to eat, stretch or watch one episode of a show (just one episode!). Try to steer away from junk food and choose much healthier options. Don’t forget to drink water and stay hydrated! 

Good luck on your finals! Do your very best and have faith in yourself! 

 

A Day In The Life of A Remote-Learner: Grace Jong 

My name is Grace Jong. I’m in my first year at PUC and I’m studying to be a nurse. It’s been a few weeks since we had to leave campus and start remote learning. It’s strange not to see my friends and professors every day but it has been nice to be home in Redlands spending some extra time with my family and I’m finally getting into a rhythm. This is what a (new) typical day looks like for me.

7:30 a.m. – I start my day by making an avocado toast for my mom before she leaves for work. 

8:00 a.m. – After my mom leaves, I start cleaning around the house. I’ll wash the dishes, vacuum the floor, and clean the mirrors. 

9:30 a.m. – Watch ONWARDS from Disney+. (By the way, I’m a HUGE Disney fan!) giphy

11:00 a.m. – Start reviewing microbiology to refresh the information I studied the night before.

12:00 p.m. – Listen to the human development lecture by Professor Michael Jefferson.

1:00 p.m. – Listen to the microbiology Lecture by Dr. Backil Sung, while cooking for my dad and younger brother 

IMG_7409

3:00 p.m. – Start my online work for the PUC admissions office 

6:00 p.m. – BREAK TIME! 

To relax, I play the piano and guitar. I’ll also snack on some goodies like Sour Patch Kids strawberry edition.

7:30 p.m. – Start studying and get back on track! Once Micro is finally out of the way, I’ll start upcoming assignments so that I don’t get too overwhelmed by the due dates.

IMG_7443

10:30 p.m. – Finish everything up and go drink some 100% raspberry juice as my reward.☺️

11:15 p.m. – Wash up and watch another movie/show from Disney+. My goal is to watch all the movies and shows from Disney+ 

1 a.m. – Goodnight! 

6b80a94725f105711c3ef956c74c510f

 

Social Media Tips To Keep In Mind

By: Ally Romanes

Right now we all have a lot of extra time on our hands and most of us find ourselves spending a good chunk of that time on social media. I’m positive you’ve all heard professors or parents telling you to be intelligent about what you post but another reminder couldn’t hurt! The first thing a lot of us do when we meet or are about to meet someone is, look them up! We all do it. A person’s social media is a representation of them, a brand if you will. It can play a role in getting into a school or getting a job. It’s important to make sure you put your best foot forward. Here are a few things to consider about your social media platforms. 

Make a good first impression

The first thing anyone sees when they land on your page is your profile photo! Make sure your photo is appropriate. I’m not suggesting everyone needs a headshot in a suit and tie as their default photo, obviously, you should have fun and express yourself how you want but it’s good to keep a few things in mind like making sure your face is visible and on a platform like LinkedIn it’s definitely a good idea to aim for as professional as possible.

Browse through your profile

Take a look at your viewable photos and videos. Pay close attention to things you might be tagged in. Look through your older posts and comments for things that may not reflect the person you are or want to be. 

Adjust your privacy settings 

I’m sure you know this already, young people are always on top of technology, but you can change your social media settings to not allow your profile to be tagged in photos or videos without your approval. You can also set it so people cannot comment on your FB timeline without approval. If you’ve found you are often being tagged in something you aren’t happy with, consider adjusting your settings. I changed mine simply because my best friend has a habit of posting the absolute ugliest photos of me.  

Update your bio!

Make sure you have current information on your page. As someone who uses social media for work often, I can’t tell you how many times I’ve taken to Facebook to look for someone’s contact information. 

Keep it professional 

Or at least use proper grammar! I don’t have anything else to say except I really like proper grammar and you should too! At least download Grammarly to give you a helping hand because no one wants to be the person whose posts get comments correcting which version of “there” they incorrectly used!

What you post online reflects who you are. Be smart about what you post because your future professor or boss might see it. Use social media to help you, not hurt you.  

 

10 Excellent Writing Tips

Not everyone is a natural writer. For some, it is actually very difficult to get thoughts onto paper, or in most cases, a computer. Sadly, you’re expected to write quite a bit as a college student. Lucky for you writing is my thing and I’m here to offer you some essay writing tips! 

Bonus: knowing how to write well will come in handy in nearly every profession you choose! 

Don’t Procrastinate 

First off, make sure you check your syllabi for essay deadlines. Then, don’t procrastinate! Professors can tell if you wrote your essay last minute. Start planning in advance so you can take your time. 

Carefully Read Directions 

Read the directions! Some students just jump straight into what they think they have to write about. Make sure you know exactly what is being asked of you before you begin. Some professors even require students to schedule an essay conference for approval. Don’t miss points because you didn’t read carefully. 

Make an Outline 

Writing can be daunting and leave you staring at a blank screen trying to figure out how to even begin. Well, my suggestion is to start with an outline. Making an outline will help you organize your thoughts and remember the great ideas you had. Outlining also helps with the flow of an essay. 

Have a Thesis 

Each essay has a point and it’s important to make that clear in your writing. Writing a thesis will help you remember what the main point of your essay is about and how you’ll go about framing your paper. 

Have a Hook 

You want to make sure you capture your reader’s attention by having an interesting hook in your introduction. You want to draw your reader’s interest while also introducing your topic. 

Have a Strong Conclusion

Your conclusion should summarize your main ideas and give a final perspective to your essay. Write strong sentences that leave your readers captivated by your essay. 

Cite Your Sources

This is a really simple tip; don’t forget to cite your sources. 

Don’t Submit Your First Draft

Don’t submit your first draft. It’s always good to read over your essay to make sure your sentences make sense, your paragraphs are in order, and you clearly made your point. You never want to submit something unfinished. 

Use Grammarly

Grammarly is a great resource for all kinds of writing. Grammarly quickly shows you simple spelling, grammar, and structure errors. It’s free and can be installed on your computer! 

Ask For Feedback 

Even if your professor doesn’t require a conference, you can still ask for some feedback. Most professors are more than happy to read over your essay or your outline and offer advice and guidance. It’s also a great opportunity to build a relationship and show them you’re serious about your education. 

As a PUC student, you have tons of resources when it comes to bettering yourself academically. If these tips don’t feel like enough, or you just want some one-on-one assistance, head over to our Teaching & Learning Center for one of their writing labs! 

 

Residential Life 101

There are tons of exciting and new things about going off to college. One of those is moving into a residential hall. Unless you went to a boarding academy (if you did you are pros already) this is likely your first time living ‘on your own’. You might be very excited about this or you might have a lot of anxiety surrounding the idea. Either way, you’re bound to have questions. Lucky for you, we have the answers! 

First of all, let’s cover how you even get a room assigned to you. It’s actually fairly simple because we’ll do it for you! Once you’re accepted, you’ll be asked to pay a $200 deposit and fill out a housing reservation form. This lets us know of your plans. Since rooms are assigned in the order they are received, it’s a good idea to do this ASAP! Room assignments are sent out in the summer. Something for you to look forward to. 

Now that we have that covered, what should you plan to bring with you? Each residence hall room contains two beds, dresser drawers, closets, desks and chairs, and one sink with a mirror. However, figuring out what else you’ll need to pack and bring to college can be difficult so to make it easier we came up with a packing list to help. Read our “Your College Packing List” post for ideas about what you probably should bring with you for your move up to PUC

Just because you’re not living at home with your family doesn’t mean you’re completely on your own. Each residence hall has a dean who lives in the building. They have a team of RAs or residence assistants, who work with them to ensure each student within their dorm is having the best experience possible. Their goal is for each student to feel like they’re part of the special Pioneers family. 

We asked RA, Alexis Keller to answer a few commonly asked questions about life in the PUC residential halls. 

What is an RA, what is your role?

An RA is a student leader in the dorms. We are there to provide educational, social, and spiritual opportunities for the residents! RA’s will do nightly “room checks,” stopping by each room to check-in and see how you’re doing. RA’s are also there to lend an ear (with confidentiality) if you want to talk about a rough day you had, a bad breakup, or if you need a shoulder to cry on, or just simply need to vent. Our rooms are always open if residents need a place to discuss any issues they are having, or just want to chill. Overall, RA’s are here to enhance your dorm life by being a resource for residents who have any questions/concerns, maintain a safe environment, create meaningful worship events, and plan fun social activities.

Will I have a curfew?

Yes, the curfew is 11 p.m. every night except for Saturday, where curfew is 12 midnight. This does not mean you have to be in your room, but simply in the building. Often residents will still be up in the various study areas of the dorm past curfew. There is also an extension to this curfew, which will be explained more during your orientation!

What social opportunities will I have in the residential hall?

There are many social opportunities in each residence hall! We typically do a big social event once a month, such as movie nights, pizza parties, pancake breakfasts, dorm Olympics, etc. Smaller social events will also happen on your own floor. Anything from a movie night, game night, tea time, and lots of others! Along with attending these social activities, you can put your own creative ideas to good use by working with your RA’s to come up with events that you would like to see happen in your dorm.

What spiritual opportunities?

Each residential hall has all-dorm worship that happens once a week with food, activities, music, and worship thought. Additionally, RA’s will have individual floor worship once a week where students can stop by for a quick snack and devotion. Along with the weekly scheduled worships, RA’s are available for one-on-one Bible studies with the residents. Even when we are not with our residents, we are always praying for them and their success!

What is one of the more challenging things about living in a residential hall and what are some ways you deal with it?

One of the more challenging aspects of living in a residential hall is learning how to live with another person in your space. Having a roommate or suitemate that is messy, has a different sleep schedule, different music tastes, or different living habits can be frustrating. It is important to always be communicative with your roommate as well as be willing to meet them halfway! College is a wonderful growing experience and these challenges can help you grow a closer connection with your roommate when handled correctly. You can always come to your RA’s to discuss any roommate disagreements and to talk about solutions and alternatives to make your living experience more comfortable and enjoyable.

What’s your favorite thing about living in the residential hall?

One of my favorite things about living in the residential hall is the sense of community. Through the various social and worship events, I get to know most of the residents in a more relaxed setting separate from the stress of school. Because we all live together, it is nice to be able to pop over to a friend’s room to hang out as well as to meet up with students within your major for study sessions.

 

How To Make The Most Of Class Time 

Sometimes the idea of sitting still and paying attention is too much to bear. I get it, really. With late nights and early mornings you’re probably tired, your classroom is warm, the idea of dozing off might seem very appealing. The thing is, you’re paying good money to be here so fight the urge to daydream your class away; get your money’s worth by making the most of your class time. Here are four simple ways to do just that. 

Be Engaged

Get into the habit of being attentive during class. Some classes are easier to pay attention to than others. A one or two-hour lecture might be more difficult than a class that requires your participation and interaction, so find something to help you stay engaged even if it’s something silly such as keeping track of how many times your professor uses a certain word or phrase. 

Take Notes 

Taking notes during class is also a great way to stay engaged during a lecture. Not only are you forcing yourself to stay engaged, but you’re also helping yourself by writing down things you’ll want to remember later. For some people, the act of physically writing things down even helps them retain that information. 

Ask Questions 

If you don’t understand something, ask. Your professors will always be happy to answer questions if you have them, even if you just need a little clarification. Not only does asking questions give you the answer you need, but it also shows your professor you’re engaged and care about their course. If you’re shy and don’t want to speak up in class, take advantage of office hours. 

Ditch the Phone

Did you know the average American checks their phone on average once every 12 minutes? If you’re sitting in class and you’re bored or having a hard time paying attention the urge to check your phone only multiples. That’s why we recommend ditching the phone altogether. Put it in your bag for the duration of class to cut the temptation. Also, it shows your professors you respect the work they put into their lectures. 

Even on the days you don’t feel 100 percent focused, make the most of your class time. Each lecture will be useful when it comes time to complete your homework or to study for quizzes and exams. Stay awake, stay focused, and make the most of your class time. If you find you’re struggling a bit with your coursework, check out some great resources PUC offers! 

 

College on a Budget

College is expensive. Not only are you paying to actually attend classes and live on campus, but you also have books and supplies to buy. On top of that, you still want to have a social life which means having money for exploring the incredible Bay Area, going out on dates, having adventures with friends, and becoming the foodie you’ve secretly always wanted to be. 

Here are some budget-friendly tips to help you get a handle on your finances while building habits that will help you throughout the rest of your life. 

Create A Budget

Establishing a budget is essential for your financial future. Make a list of your monthly payments so you know exactly how much you have leftover. Also, plan ahead. Do you have a large purchase or trip coming up? Make sure to set money aside. 

Make a list of your purchases

If you’re like me you really enjoy online shopping. This is a dangerous habit to be in. Try and keep a list of the things you purchase so you’re not surprised at the end of the month. 

Check Your Bank Account

This may sound like a given but keep track of your money. Check your account weekly. Make sure your auto-payments are going through and check your receipts to be sure you’re charged the correct amount for things. 

Make a list of things you NEED

Before shopping, figure out what you actually need so you don’t walk into Target for toothpaste and walk out with five new outfits, some workout gear, and a cart full of snacks. Maybe still get a few of those things, though …

Put Your Money Into Savings

If you don’t have a savings account yet, open one. Take at least 10 percent of what you make and place it into your savings account. The more you save, the more you will have for your future. 

Create A Financial Goal 

Select a specific amount of money and strive to always have at least that in your bank account in case of an emergency. You never know when you might have car trouble or drop your phone into a puddle. 

Take Advantage of Your Student ID

There are lots of places that give student discounts. From restaurants and clothing stores to museums. It doesn’t hurt to ask! 

Adulting can be hard, especially when it involves finances. But you can get into habits now that will really help your future self! And hey, you can always get a job! For more information about student jobs on campus check out this great blog

 

Seven Tips for Mental Health Upkeep

Ally Romanes 

Like most people, you may find yourself feeling overwhelmed from time to time. Stress is something literally everyone deals with and often struggles with. While a lot of times you are able to completely manage it, there are times things may feel out of control. Between the weight of school, work, and your personal life, it can get to be too much. It’s very important for you to take care of your mental health, especially while you’re in college. Here are seven mental health upkeep tips

Sleep

It can be hard to get a good night’s rest during college, but it is a must! The more hours of sleep you get, the more refreshed you will feel in the morning and throughout your day. Your brain needs sleep in order to perform. When you sleep, your brain helps your body heal from all the stress you encountered during the day. Getting more than five hours of sleep will also improve your mood.

Have A Support System

Having a support system will help keep you on your feet. Every student feels stressed and overwhelmed. A strong support system will show that you are not alone and means you will have people to go for help and encouragement. By having your friends, family, and professors by your side, success is much easier to obtain. You can’t do everything on your own! Don’t be afraid to reach out to those people in your support system. 

Have A Healthy Diet

What you eat affects your body, mind, and spirit. The healthier you eat, the better you will feel. Eating a lot of junk food will slow you down both physically and mentally. Skip the chips and opt for a healthy snack!

Get Active

As Elle Woods once said, “Exercise gives you endorphins. Endorphins make you happy.”  The more active you are, the more endorphins your body will have. Exercising will boost your mood, take your mind off of stressors, and will help you feel accomplished. You will also have more energy and motivation to get things done. giphy-1

Pray

There is power in prayer. Take all your worries, stress, and burdens to God. He is a source of comfort and strength. Praying about your troubles can help you feel some of your burdens are off your shoulders. Feel like you need a little extra prayer? Reach out to one of our campus chaplains! 

Meet With A Campus Counselor

Take advantage of the counselors on campus—it’s free. Meeting with a counselor allows you to vent about the stress you are going through. A counselor can teach you great techniques to deal with your stress, like how to calm yourself before an exam or how to cope with feeling overwhelmed. A counselor can also be part of your support system. Meetings are confidential, so feel free to share anything. 

Reward Yourself

You need to recognize how hard you work to accomplish your many tasks. Reward yourself by going out to eat, taking a nap, or watching a show or movie. Feel proud and confident about the work you’ve done and the progress you are making to own each day. Continue making goals and reward yourself again and again.

Everyone deals with stress differently but one thing is clear, we all need a little help every once in a while and hopefully, these seven tips will come in handy!