Tag Archives: san Francisco

Eight Must-See Museums in San Francisco 

Ally Romanes

The Bay Area is filled with a ton of museums. In fact, there are 55 museums just in San Francisco alone. If you’re like me, that’s an overwhelming number AND you want to see all of them! Not quite sure where to begin? Let me help! Here are eight must-see museums to get you started.  

California Academy of Sciences 

The California Academy of Sciences is one of the most popular museums in San Francisco. With an aquarium, planetarium and a natural history museum, you’ll be able to see and learn all sorts of cool things. The museum will immerse you into a four-story rain forest, a trip to see the penguins, and shows that transport you through our planet.  

Ticket prices vary due to the date you want to visit. The museum does have a student discount, so bring your school ID with you! 

For hours and admission fees, click here for more information. 

de Young Museum 

Home to modern art, contemporary art, American art, African, art and so much more. You will be able to see different kinds of art from all over the world and from different time periods. Also, a very popular Instagram spot, make sure you visit the ninth floor to enjoy a 360 view of the city. 

The best part is that admission for students is only $6! Bring your student ID, your friends, and your camera to enjoy part of your day at the de Young Museum. 

For hours and ticket purchases, visit their website

Exploratorium 

The Exploratorium is an interactive museum with over 600 exhibits to choose from. You’ll be able to learn and experience the world of science, art, and human perception. The Exploratorium also has a great view of the city from Pier 15. 

Ticket prices with student discount cost $24.95. For more information, visit their website

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

With over 33,000 modern and contemporary artworks on display, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) houses works by artists from all over the world. From Frida Kahlo to Andy Warhol, you will be able to explore the different artwork from different artists. There is also an outdoor sculpture garden for you to stroll through and nice views of the city. 

Tickets for students from ages 19-24 cost $19. Ages 18 and below are free but still needs an admission ticket. To purchase tickets and have more information, visit their website

Legion of Honor 

The Legion of Honor is a beautiful museum built to pay tribute to the soldiers that died in World War 1. The museum features over 4,000 years of ancient and European art. They also have public concerts on Saturday and Sundays with performances playing Bach, Gershwin, and great film scores. 

Ticket prices with student discount are only $6. For hours and information, visit their website

Museum of Ice Cream 

If you haven’t been to the Museum of Ice Cream, you need to book a visit soon! How can you miss out on a museum dedicated to ice cream? Here’s the scoop: you get free ice cream, there are ten interactive rooms with cool photo opportunities and you get to jump into a pool of sprinkles.

Tickets cost $38. To purchase tickets and get more information, visit their website.  

Asian Art Museum 

Capturing the beauty of Asian culture, the Asian Art Museum has collections of historical and contemporary Asian art to showcase. Their exhibitions are interesting and change year-round, so make sure to check their website to know what exhibits are going on when you plan to visit. 

Tickets with student discount cost $10 and $20 if you want to see the special exhibitions. To get more information about the museum, visit their website.  

The Walt Disney Family Museum

If you’re a huge Disney fan, this museum is for you. You will be able to go back into history and learn about the famous Disney stories and about Walt Disney’s life. There are lines of photos, drawings, and props used throughout many years of Disney. They also have film screenings for you to enjoy. 

Tickets with student ID cost $20 and $30 if you want to view the Mickey Mouse Exhibition Combo. To purchase tickets, visit their website

Now get out there and check these museums out! 

 

What I Should Be Doing: An Interview with Music Alumnus Brennan Stokes

By Becky St. Clair

Brennan Stokes graduated from Pacific Union College in 2013 with a degree in piano performance. Having discovered a love for composition while studying with Professor Asher Raboy in the department of music, Stokes chose to continue his education at San Francisco Conservatory of Music, graduating in 2019 with a Master’s of Music in composition. Today he maintains a teaching studio in San Francisco’s Sunset District, passing on his love of music to the next generation of pianists. 

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How did you discover your love for music?

My parents are both musically inclined; they both sang in the church choir, Mom took piano lessons as a kid, and Dad plays the trumpet. They started me in piano lessons when I was in kindergarten, but there was always music in our house. I just took it and ran with it.

How did you settle on the piano?

It was the first instrument I learned, and it was a match from the start. I really liked it, and according to my teachers, I showed some promise for it, so I kept playing. Piano just made sense to me. 

How did composing become part of your musical life?

I always assumed I was going to be on one side of the page. I knew I was going to learn it, research it, analyze it, but I never considered creating it myself. When I found out I had to take a composition class for my degree, I wasn’t sure how it was going to go, but after our first assignment I realized how magical this process is and I fell in love with it. I continued to take classes with Professor Raboy even after the requirements were done. Creating new music was incredibly exciting for me. 

Tell us about your studio.

I teach 30-35 students a week, all between the ages of 5 and 13. My schedule is very flexible; since most kids are in school, I am relatively free during the day. I start teaching around 3 p.m. three days a week and teach until 8 p.m. I enjoy what I do. I consider myself very fortunate to be working in my field, teaching young musicians.

When you’re not teaching kids to create music, you create music yourself. Describe your approach to practicing.

Really, it starts slow. Paying attention to fingerings becomes essential; training my hands to do smaller tasks automatically. Then I focus on rhythm, hand by hand, figuring out what each part of the piece sounds like, then I put it all together. A valuable tool Dr. Wheeler gave me is reverse practice. If you only ever start your practice at the beginning of a piece, that’s always going to be the strong part. But if you start at the end, which is often the hardest part, you ensure the end is also strong. Then you feel even more comfortable with the piece. 

What is the difference between hearing a piece and playing it?

It’s a totally different experience to hear a piece than it is to see what the hands have to do to make the piece happen. You may feel like you know a piece after listening to it multiple times, but when you sit down to actually play it, you realize there are little rhythmic or harmonic nuances you didn’t realize were there. For example, the harmonies in some Chopin and Rachmaninoff pieces are super crunchy. It sounds like you’re playing something wrong and you check the notes three times, but that’s really what it is. You learn it, and suddenly it’s not crunchy anymore; it works. 

Aside from providing a way to make a living, how has studying music contributed positively to your life?

The last several years I’ve been getting into poetry and it has turned into a cycle of self-enrichment. I read poetry and feel like it was meant to be an art song, so I create some vocal music to go with the poem. Also, music allows me to meet really incredible people from all over the world. Music is the most universal thing; it doesn’t matter where you come from or what language you speak, you can bond over music. I love how it brings people together.

Who is your favorite composer to play, and why?

I’d say Chopin and this relatively new 20th century English composer named York Bowen. Chopin changed the game for solo piano. Yes, it’s technical, but once you get it in the fingers, it becomes so fluid and so natural. There’s playfulness, there’s sadness, and the composer’s intentions are really clear. Bowen utilizes really rich harmonies and has a bit of a jazzier feeling. I don’t think he’s well known but he’s written a ton of music; in particular, his preludes and ballads feel really nice to play.

Who is your favorite composer to listen to, and why?

There are two to whom I constantly return: Ravel and Beethoven. I have yet to encounter a piece by Ravel I’m not stunned by. He was a wizard of music and his chamber and orchestra music is stunning. Every instrument’s shape and technique is magic because he thought about more than the obvious ways to use the instrument. He utilizes every aspect of shading to get different tone colors and sounds.

Beethoven takes his time with his surprises. What he did to change musical form is a reminder that if you feel like doing something, you can. He’ll pull a fortissimo out of nowhere or move through his harmonies in an unexpected way. His sonatas are really rich; one movement is fiery and passionate then another is lyrical and serene. It’s incredible to realize you don’t always have to do the same thing all the time. He reminds me to come back to things that are good and innovate. I’m still looking back to these masters and finding ways to influence my music-making process. 

What is something you want to improve about your musicianship, and what are you currently doing to move in that direction?

Right now, rhythms and the finer points of notating what I want, maintaining my ear to get the intricate harmonies I love. I constantly have to work at how I put the complicated pieces together in the way I want them. During my first year of grad school, I took a musicianship class, and it was insane but incredible. Walking out of that class, my ear was so much sharper than it had been walking in. I still use techniques from that class to keep track of what has happened in a piece and what I’m doing next. 

What is the highlight of your career thus far?

Definitely my first composition recital in November 2017—the first time I heard one of my pieces performed. I had composed two songs for mezzo soprano, violin, cello, and piano, and I was terrified. I’m so used to being in the driver’s seat, and it was terrifying to be the composer just sitting in the audience watching four other people do my music and having zero control over what happened.

It was an immense learning curve handing my music over to other musicians; what I think works initially may not actually work after a second pair of eyes looks it over, especially when I’m composing for instruments that are not my primary. I also learned that how performers interpret music is also a part of the creative process.

A lot of people came up to me afterward and said it was amazing. It was a moment when all of my fears of not being good enough vanished. To be positively received by an audience was wonderful, but for my music to be positively received by the musicians playing it was even better. It was confirmation I was doing what I should be doing.

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If you could change one thing about society’s perception of classical music, what would it be?

I wish more people understood if you have the context of 20th century music, it will make more sense. The 20th century saw a lot of horrible things happen, and that’s reflected in dissonant 20th century music. It’s not necessarily pretty to listen to, but if you understand what they’re trying to say you don’t necessarily disagree with it. It takes a moment to transcend what you’re hearing and realize what the composer is saying; for example, a minor key with shrieking strings can express how a Polish composer feels about the Holocaust. If you understand what it is they were experiencing or reacting to, it contextualizes their voice and makes the music more accessible. 

How do you deal with performance anxiety?

I read a book on performance anxiety and the author said if you don’t get nervous, if you don’t feel anxious or get a boost in energy (whether positive or negative) before a performance, it’s apathy. You don’t really care. If you’re nervous before you perform, it means you want to do a good job and perform to the best of your ability to make sure what you put out there is wonderful. That really changed my way of thinking. I’ve learned to recognize what happens to me and where my nervousness affects me the most, then find a way to adjust. I try to fully relax my body and tell myself I’m going to give a wonderful performance. I reassure myself I’ve practiced, I’m ready, and I’m a good enough musician to find my way through the performance. This is music and music is fun, and sharing it with others should be enjoyable. That nervous feeling just means I’m doing the right thing. I’m doing something that matters to me. And that’s how it should be. 

 

Five Great Things About SF

By: Dana Negro

There’s a reason why over 25 million people visit San Francisco each year! On top of the beautiful ocean views, you also have so much excitement to choose from. Whether you’re active and want to hike or kayak, or more interested in listening to great music or seeing a fabulous theatrical production, you will never have the same experience twice. Since it’s only 78 miles away from campus, you’ll be able to go over and over. 

Shopping, Shopping, Shopping

The city has some great shopping so grab a friend and head on out for a whole new wardrobe! Ok, maybe don’t overdo it. Whether you’re looking for a specific new item for your closet or just window shopping, you’re sure to have a great time.

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The Golden Gate Bridge is … Orange?

You may be disappointed to learn the Golden Gate Bridge is actually an orange vermilion officially known as international orange. While the bridge itself may not be golden, the view sure is! Take a walk across it or a selfie in front of it. 

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Let’s Go, Giants! 

One of the best things about SF is how diverse it is. You can find anything you want from food, art, and music, to any kind of sporting event you can imagine. One of the best spots in the whole city is the newly renamed Oracle Park, home of the San Francisco Giants! Whether you bleed orange and black or you’re just there for food and the McCovey Cove view, you’ll have a classic Bay Area experience. Don’t forget your foam finger! 

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Inspiration all Around

The city is jam-packed with creative minds, from the latest tech moguls to incredible artists, you’re bound to be inspired every time you turn around. Did you know there are 55 museums in SF alone? Two of our favorites are the Museum of Modern Art where you can see exhibits from Warhol to Monet and the Academy of Science with an aquarium, planetarium, and a natural history museum all under one roof. 

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Eat and Eat and Eat Some More

Is there anything better than food? The Bay Area is known for amazing cuisine. From food trucks to five-star restaurants, there’s always something new to try. Did you know the city hosts multiple food truck festivals each year? If that doesn’t sell you on visiting the city, we don’t know what will! 

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These are just five things we think are pretty great about living near San Francisco, but what’s even more fantastic is you get to come up with your own list!