Tag Archives: PUC academics

Finish In Four: Stay On Track

Getting accepted into college is a great accomplishment! Now, you will want to have a plan to stay on track and graduate in four years. While that’s not always possible (lots of people take five!), here are some things you can do to ensure you stay on track.

 Meet Regularly With Your Academic Advisor

Your academic advisor is one of the most important individuals on your academic journey. They will help you plan your schedule each quarter and can walk you through your curriculum guidesheet and track your academic progress using the Student Planning tool to assure you’re registered for the right classes at the right time.

 Complete An Average of 16 Credits Per Quarter

To earn a baccalaureate degree in four years, you need to complete at least 192 college-level credits, which is about 48 credits per year, and an average of 16 credits per quarter. That means you should plan for 16 credits a quarter. If you get behind, don’t worry; your advisor can assist you in figuring out how to fit in some extra credits or apply for summer classes! 

 Follow Your Curriculum Guidesheets

Every program has what’s called a curriculum guidesheet, which lists the classes needed to complete the program and contains a sample four-year schedule you can refer to when planning your schedule each quarter. Visit puc.edu/academics/degrees-programs for a complete list of programs and the accompanying guidesheet. 

Note: Undeclared students can still plan to finish in four years if they take an average of 16 well-chosen credits per quarter! You may refer to the “Information for Undeclared Majors” guidesheet for a sample first-year schedule for deciding students.

Track Your Progress with the Student Planning Tool

This helpful tool (available through WebAdvisor) shows you which courses you will need to take to complete your degree. If you’re considering changing your major, you can also run a comparison for a new degree to see which requirements you have already met and how many credits you still need to complete. The Student Planning tool is available through your WebAdvisor account in the Academic Profile section (click on “Student Planning” and select “My Progress”).

 Avoid Transferring Schools

Don’t leave! Since different schools offer varying degrees and requirements, earning a chosen degree on time means committing to a school’s program and tenaciously working toward completing requirements. Plus, we’d miss you.

 Take Your Classes Seriously 

Attend your classes and take them seriously. Did you know if your cumulative GPA falls below a 2.0, you will be placed on academic probation? That could seriously slow you down. But not to worry, if you are struggling, we encourage you to seek help from your academic advisor and the Teaching and Learning Center (TLC). There are multiple resources available to you helping establish academic success. 

Just remember, while stressful at times, your years in college are going to be some of the greatest! By keeping the above steps in mind and accepting the support your Pioneers family offers, you’re setting yourself up for a successful and meaningful scholastic quest. 

 

London Streets: Honors photo blog

The Honors program’s summer trip to London was an incredible learning experience for both faculty and students. Their course, “London Streets” took them throughout the city, personalizing literature they’d studied in previous courses and bringing history to life. Here are a few of their favorite moments captured on film! 

 

1

The first day on the train from Newbold to London, bright-eyed and ready to go. (Left to right, front: Amy Ramos (Exercise Science), Sarah Tanner (English), Grae McKelvie (BS Management); back: Ervin Jackson (Biochem), Sebastian Anderson (Graphic Design), a British person, Isabel McMillan (History)) (All class of 2021)

2

On the train, first day of week 2: (Left to right: Ervin, Grae, Sebastian, Sarah, Amy)

 

 

3

Where modern epidemiology and germ theory was born. This pump was ground zero for the cholera epidemic of 1854. (Left to right: Isabel, Ervin, Sebastian, Sarah, Amy, Grae)

 

4

In the 19th-century operating theatre of St. Thomas’s hospital (front to back: Sarah, Sebastian, Grae, Isabel, Amy, Ervin)

 

5

Suffragette propaganda in the People’s History Museum, Manchester (Sarah and Isabel)

 

6

Saying goodbye on the last day (Isabel, Sarah, Amy; Sebastian in back)

 

 

 

 

 

London Streets: Reflections On A Summer Study Tour

By Becky St. Clair

For three weeks this summer, Peter Katz, director of the Honors Program and professor of English, led a study tour for honors students in London, UK. Their course, “London Streets” took them throughout the city, personalizing literature they’d studied in previous courses and bringing history to life. Together, professor and students considered the ethics and obligations of seeing poverty both in Victorian times and now, interrogated the intersection between scientific regulation of health and governmental power, and traced the geographic and cultural impact of industrialization. 

“This trip was the best possible way I could have imagined my first excursion into Europe,” said honors student Sebastian Anderson. “It was the perfect balance between checking off the typical tourist attractions and activities while also getting to explore London in a more intimate way through our class trips and our readings.” 

Two participating students agreed to share their reflections on specific parts of their trip with us, so we could share their experiences directly with you, our readers. 

Isabel McMillan, history major

After a walking tour about the crimes of Jack the Ripper, I commented that his story was a female-centric story. I wished that when we told the stories of his victims we didn’t have to focus so much on the men, and could talk more about the women and their stories. One of my classmates pointed out history is male-centered, and society is misogynistic, and our storytelling of history has to be male-centric. 

Contemplating this perspective, I came to the conclusion that while it is not entirely wrong, it’s also not entirely right. 

I remembered this exhibit on a ship I saw in a Swedish museum once. The exhibit’s storytelling began with two of the women who were on the ship when it sank. The researchers did as much research as they could on these women, and learned quite a bit. Part of what they found included records of a woman who was in charge of building the ship, and how she met with the king about its progress. They also discovered records of another woman who ran a business vital to the building of that ship, as well as court documents detailing stories of women involved with court cases (there were laws against women being involved in court cases, and yet..). There was so much more. Most of this history was pre-Victoria. What I’m trying to say is that researching women and their lives is possible. Hard, but possible. 

Another thing I realized in all of this was by saying history is misogynistic and society is created for the white man, it gives people an excuse to not even try researching women. Allowing people to say the only way to tell women’s stories is through the point of view of the men in their lives allows people to not try, and to not feel guilty about their lack of effort. And that is not acceptable.

Sarah Tanner, English major

In looking over notes from this trip, I realized beginning on July 9, I switched from titling my class journal entries “reflections” to “reactions.” It wasn’t a deliberate move, but it matched the intensity of my interaction with the class and topics as we worked through some genuinely difficult discussions. 

 If I could distill this class into one key point, it would be, “bodies matter.” Politics, institutions, and good intentions all have their place, but unless we prioritize human bodies, their needs, and their desires, our ability to successfully empathize and care for those around us will forever be stunted. I want to believe on some level, most people recognize the truth in this, but until one is confronted with the immediacy of this need, it’s easy to overlook. Personally, it took almost stumbling over a homeless man outside the underground in Camden for me to recognize the necessity of enacting care for these bodies. And even then, when faced with the reality of his fraught situation, it was clear not everyone in our group processed the experience in the same way. 

 This class instilled in me a sense of urgency, an impulse to look more closely at the people around me and consider how I can help. And as much as I love modern literature, I have learned to stand in defense of the Victorian optimism that maintains that something can be done for these bodies. It just requires a degree of awareness (I’m convinced) results from trips such as this one. 

 Checking in with a structure or area’s effective gravity and reading it against one’s own response to that place is a practice vital to the optimist’s project. It requires constant self-reflection and comparison to the world beyond what is immediately available in a physical or bodily sense. Paradoxically, it creates a simultaneous drive for introspection and increased connection with others. While seemingly contradictory, I think this oscillation is important; to empathize, one must have a personal attachment to the shared effect, and that requires a degree of knowledge of self and others.  

 This practice is something I will definitely carry with me long after we all fly home; Victorian optimism has taken a piece of my heart. I want to be more aware, to see myself and others as more than separate components of a larger system, to seek out individual bodies in need of physical and emotional care. And more than foundational awareness, I want to be available to anyone who feels that need as well. 

 

Academic Spotlight: Emergency Services

The emergency services programs at PUC prepare students to be leaders and highly skilled professionals in the emergency and fire responder fields. If you’re considering a career in the fire service, law enforcement, disaster relief, or emergency medical services, a degree in emergency services from PUC may be for you. 

 Programs offered:

  • A.S. in Emergency Services
  • B.S. in Emergency Management

 A Faculty’s Perspective

“By far my favorite thing at PUC is the people I have the opportunity to interact with every day. I love my students! They keep me on my toes. My co-workers have been so inviting and supportive. What more could you ask for?” – Matthew Russell, instructor of emergency services

Fast Facts 

  1. PUC’s emergency services program educates students who are seeking a two-year or four-year degree to prepare them for a wide variety of careers within the field of emergency services. Students interested in becoming EMTs and paramedics can take the A.S. degree route, while those wanting a management level position can continue on with the B.S. degree. 
  2. Training and volunteer emergency service opportunities are available to PUC EMS students at the Angwin Volunteer Fire Department. Students can gain real-life experience while still in school and also give their careers a head start! Read “Choose Your Own PUC Adventure: Be a Volunteer Firefighter” to get a behind the scenes look at what it’s like to volunteer with the AVFD. 
  3. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates emergency services professions will be among the fastest-growing fields in the U.S. through at least 2026. Employment of EMTs and paramedics is projected to grow rapidly, at about 15 percent from 2016 to 2026, which is much faster than the average for all occupations, with a median pay of $34,320 in 2018. For emergency management directors, employment is projected to grow at around 8 percent or about as fast as average for all occupations, and the median pay for those occupations was $74,420 in 2018. 

What You Can Do With This Major

There are a variety of different careers available for students interested in the essential intersection of healthcare and public service.

  • Emergency dispatcher
  • Emergency management coordinator
  • EMT/ambulance driver
  • Firefighter
  • Homeland security officer
  • Hospital/community emergency preparedness 

Learn more about the emergency services program at puc.edu/academics. Our team of admissions counselors can answer any questions you have about PUC’s EMS program, or the other majors the college offers. Call (800) 862-7080, option 2 or email admissions@puc.edu to get connected with a counselor now and start learning about all the options available to you!

Academic Spotlight: Honors

For the intellectually curious and the academically adept, the Honors Program at PUC provides a stimulating environment for completing General Education requirements for any baccalaureate degree with a cohort of serious scholars in seminars focused on in-depth understanding through lively discussions.

Honors courses encourage the exploration of challenging ideas through analytical reading, careful thinking, and stimulating discussions. These courses focus on depth of knowledge through a thematic approach that intertwines disciplines.

Why should you join the Honors Program at PUC?

  • Take an Honors seminar in another country
  • Be well-prepared for graduate and professional school
  • Take fewer General Education classes, making space for a potential second major 
  • Take home a diploma stamped “With Honors” 

Check out the Honors Program’s Instagram account @PUCHonors to see photos from their recent study tour to England!

Program entry requirements:

  • Strong reading and writing skills
  • Minimum 3.5 high school GPA
  • SAT of 1700 or ACT of 26
  • Highly motivated to pursue understanding

A Student’s Perspective

Recent graduate Laurel Kwon, who studied English and Honors at PUC, recently completed her final Honors project, for which she translated her understanding of Jane Eyre into a 10-minute piano composition. “I thought it would be fun to connect my English major side with my musical side,” she says. Read “Words to Notes: Honors Student Composes Piano Version of Jane Eyre” to learn more about Laurel’s capstone Honors project. 

You can also hear from alum Emily Mathe about her experience with Honors at PUC by reading her “4 Reasons You Might Belong in the Honors Program” blog post and why you should consider joining the Program!

Apply to the Honors Program

Apply to the Honors Program at PUC today! Visit puc.edu/honors to learn more about the Program, including faculty mentors, seminars, the capstone project, and other student opportunities. Freshmen enrollment is limited to 20 students per year. Online applications are reviewed monthly until all seats are filled. 

Questions? Our team of admissions counselors can talk with you about the college’s Honors Program and all of the academic programs the college offers. Call (800) 862-7080, option 2 or email admissions@puc.edu to get connected with a counselor now and start learning about all the options available to you! 

 

Academic Spotlight: World Languages & Cultures

PUC’s world languages & cultures program not only prepares students to speak another language but also learn to understand and appreciate different cultures for a greater understanding of our increasingly interconnected world. Students are encouraged to study abroad where they can fully immerse themselves in a new environment, giving them an unparalleled collegiate experience.

Programs offered:

  • Major in Language and Culture Studies, B.A.
    • Emphasis in Arabic
    • Emphasis in French
    • Emphasis in German
    • Emphasis in Italian
    • Emphasis in Portuguese
    • Emphasis in Spanish
  • Major in Spanish Studies, B.A. 

Alumni Highlight

Shanna Crumley, ’12, an intercultural communication and Spanish alumna of PUC, was part of a team that built an app using blockchain technology for use by refugees and others who no longer have access to personal records. The app won the SIPA Dean’s Public Policy Challenge Grant competition in 2018, a year-long entrepreneurship challenge consisting of several rounds and culminating in a $30,000 first-place award. Read “Rebuilding Their Futures: Alumna & Faculty Win $30K Grant for Refugee Work” to learn about Shanna’s experience creating the app.

Fast Facts  

  1. Through Adventist Colleges Abroad, students have the opportunity to spend time learning languages in the countries where they are spoken, including places such as Spain, France, Germany, Italy, England, and Argentina.
  2. Graduates from world languages & cultures programs have obtained employment in state government, education, business, medicine, and many other fields where their language skills and cultural knowledge are a tremendous asset. 
  3. As the world becomes more global and connected, the demand for professionals who can work well with others from a variety of cultures and backgrounds will continue to grow. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of interpreters and translators is projected to grow rapidly, at about 18 percent from 2016 to 2026, which is much faster than the average for all occupations, with a median pay of $49,930 in 2018. For foreign language and literature teachers, while employment projections are not available, the median pay for those occupations was $79,160 in 2018. 

What You Can Do With This Major

Equipped with the skills to communicate with people from different cultures across the globe, there’s no telling where you might end up with a degree in world languages & cultures. 

  • Ambassador
  • Law
  • Library science
  • Social work
  • Teaching
  • Tourism
  • Translation/Interpretation
  • Writer/Journalist
  • Youth/Mission outreach 

Learn more about the department of world languages & cultures at puc.edu/academics. Our team of admissions counselors can answer any questions you have about these programs, or the other majors the college offers. Call (800) 862-7080, option 2 or email admissions@puc.edu to get connected with a counselor now and start learning about all the options available to you! 

 

Prepared for Success: An Overview of PUC’s Top Programs

By Sarah Tanner

With over 70 different degrees and programs, PUC’s academic opportunities are wide-ranging and diverse. From world languages to physics to fine arts, students are encouraged to find a field that best suits their interests and talents. And with so many options available, everyone can find a major to match their specific gifts. We chatted with a few students in PUC’s top programs to find out what makes them so great.

Nursing & Health Sciences

One of PUC’s most popular tracks, the department of nursing and health sciences draws an increasing number of students each year.

McKenna Freier, sophomore

“I grew up watching my mom go through nursing school and got to learn alongside her at a young age. My passion for nursing sparked when I was very young, and since then it has only grown stronger. I want to help people get back to being healthy and living their lives to the fullest. I really appreciate how much the PUC department of nursing is there for the students. They give us many resources to help us along our journey as they know it is a difficult one. Once I was accepted they helped me work through everything and made sure I was ready to begin my nursing career with confidence. If I ever have questions or concerns they always have someone readily available to help.”

Business Administration

The department of business is another popular choice at PUC and is often combined with the pre-medical program as students seek a well-rounded college experience.

Kenneth Grae McKelvie, sophomore, honors student

“I decided to major in business mostly due to the advice of many physicians that are members of my home church who all wished they had taken business classes when they were in college. After graduating from PUC and medical school, I hope to use my business management degree to help start up my own pediatric clinic. I feel confident the skills I will have gained during my time at PUC will prepare me well as I look toward my career.”

Biology

Another popular choice for students hoping to attend medical school, the biology program offers a comprehensive overview of life sciences.

Victoria Gabardi, sophomore, honors student

“I was convinced to change majors from biochemistry to biology at the end of my freshman year after I realized how many classes from the department of biology would prepare me for medical school. As a biology major, I have the opportunity to take immunology, histology, and advanced human anatomy courses before I even attend medical school. Having a background with the material from these courses will prepare me well for the field of medicine. My favorite thing about the department of biology is all of the unique opportunities I receive. Learning biology can take place outside of a classroom. For instance, this spring break I am going to Kenya with my tropical biology class to do a mission trip while also taking time to learn biology. There are a lot of biology classes that involve going on hikes in nature or going to the beach to study marine science. I also love how elegant biology is. It can encompass something as small as a single protein in an organelle to something as large as rainforest ecosystems. It connects life from all levels of organization.”

Exercise Science

Another widely pursued program is exercise science. The department features programs designed to prepare students for careers in physical education and the exercise sciences, which are often combined with pre-professional programs.

Amy Robles, sophomore, honors student

“Something I appreciate about the department is that they inform you well about the different areas in which this major is useful. They require classes that cross over with the subjects I will also learn about in graduate school, including anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, and exercise physiology, among others. With this degree, I plan to apply to the physical therapy program at Loma Linda University. My future goal is to specialize in pediatrics and work with kids that have disabilities. I think PUC’s department of exercise science is preparing me for this career by introducing me to many of the topics I will be learning in graduate school and teaches us about sports and athletic injuries that I may encounter as I advance in my career.”

Visual Arts

Vastly different than the sciences, PUC also offers a number of humanities-based majors. Degrees in visual arts range from photography to graphic design to film, and many things between.

Keren Castro, freshman, photography

“I picked visual arts because it is something I have been passionate about since seventh grade. Originally, I thought photography was simply a hobby, but as time progressed, I realized it is something I want to gain a deeper education in. One thing I really appreciate about the department of visual arts at PUC is its flexibility. Everyone is open to new ideas and the overall mindset of the department fosters individual creativity. Someday, I definitely want to start a business and have my own studio. I think it is something I will be able to do after graduating from PUC.”

Communication

An increasingly popular option at PUC is communication. The program includes three emphases to choose between, as well as a handful of minors.

Hailey Johanson, sophomore, honors student

“My favorite aspect of being part of the department of communication are the professors. I strongly believe my department has some of the most dedicated, smart, and passionate faculty at PUC. My department is run by strong, intelligent women, and their life experiences and candor really speaks to me and motivates me to pursue this degree. Likewise, I appreciate the in-depth knowledge my degree encompasses. There are so many aspects of communication; its applications are everywhere. Communication is a crucial facet of the human existence and is an integral part of every field. I am of the opinion the opportunities for a communications major are endless. It is for these reasons I love my department as well as my major.”

The personal testimonies of so many students speak for themselves, and regardless of one’s choice of department, pursuing a degree at PUC is sure to be a rewarding experience. Those interested in learning more about the programs offered on campus are encouraged to explore PUC’s website to learn more about the available courses of study at puc.edu/academics.