A Q&A with Ron Graybill, 2019 Civil Rights Lecturer

By Becky St. Clair

Dr. Ron Graybill has served his communities in a variety of ways over the years: professor, journalist, communications specialist, editor, and pastor. A native of Northern California, Graybill spent third grade at Pacific Union College Elementary School while his mother trained at PUC to be a teacher. He now has an M.Div. degree from Andrews University, and a Ph.D. in American religious history from Johns Hopkins University.

Graybill spent 13 years as an associate secretary at the Ellen G. White Estate at General Conference Headquarters, where he assisted Arthur White in writing the six-volume biography of Ellen G.White. His many articles on Adventist history made him one of the most frequently cited sources in the new Ellen G. White Encyclopedia.

On Saturday, March 9, Graybill will present this perspective during the 2019 Civil Rights Lecture at PUC, titled, “James Edson White: Flawed Hero.” This lecture is free and open to the public and will begin at 4 p.m. in Paulin Hall.

Tell us about your lecture. What will you be talking about?

It is the story of the life of James Edson White, with emphasis on his pioneer evangelistic, educational, and humanitarian work among Mississippi Blacks between 1895 and 1900, but with little-known aspects of his troubled childhood, youth, and young manhood. My presentation will also describe the sort of paternalistic racism which characterized most social action by whites during that era.

Much of what you will be saying in your lecture is an elaboration of your 1971 book, Mission to Black America, which was just released this month in a second edition. Tell us a little about that book.

In Mission to Black America, I tell the harrowing, yet inspiring story of James Edson White’s heroic and misunderstood efforts to spread the advent message among the Black people of Mississippi in the late 19th century. The Black people were willing to listen, but not everyone wanted them to hear. To write the book I visited several sites in Mississippi, interviewed persons who lived through the events described and made use of unpublished and confidential correspondence between Edson White and his mother, Ellen G. White. During my research, I even uncovered previously unstudied court records on the Olvin murder case. I think its application to current issues make it still a very relevant tale today.

Can you elaborate on that last part? What, in particular, makes this story relevant today?

We are in an era when the long-standing racism of much of American society has come more obviously into view. Understanding how even the most progressive individuals in the past still had racial flaws helps us become more aware of our own unconscious assumptions and feelings about race, and thus better able to admit and overcome them.

I understand you’ll be guest lecturing in a number of classes while you’re here. What will you be talking about?

I will be lecturing in religion, history, and English classes on Ellen White’s unreleased handwritten documents. While it is said all her letters and manuscripts are released online, it is only the polished, edited versions of those documents that have been released. I will show how a careful study of the holographs (documents in the author’s own handwriting) brings new evidence to light; evidence that has been lost in the process of correcting, editing, and polishing her documents for publication. I will also expose students to the discipline of documentary editing, showing how original handwritten documents are now commonly prepared for scholarly publication so as not to lose any of the information found in the handwritten drafts. In this study, I will make use of the previously unknown Ellen White letter that was just discovered in the PUC Library’s archival collection.

How did your intense interest in the White family begin?

As we discussed racial issues and pushed racial reforms in the 1960s, I became aware of how Mrs. White’s apparent support of segregation loomed behind the scenes. Then I discovered the historical background that rendered her statements more understandable and defensible, as well as her clear but long-forgotten condemnation of racial discrimination. My research in these topics and my book about Edson White won me the appointment to the White Estate to assist Arthur White in writing the six-volume biography of his grandmother, Ellen White.

What sparked your passion for positive race relations in particular?

My high school girlfriend was part Mexican, part Apache, and part French. I had an aunt who thought it was terrible I should date “such a person.” Her views on race fueled my passion for better race relations.

What do you hope students who attend this lecture will take away from it?

My hope is this lecture will inspire a chastened pride in some aspects of the American and Adventist past. What I mean by that is it is possible to be proud of our heritage without denying or forgetting the mistakes our ancestors made. We can acknowledge we represent the results of those mistakes, but in recognizing these things we can also move forward positively in our church, in our communities, and in our country.

Dr. Graybill’s current hobby: Hiking the 2,600 mile Pacific Crest Trail in one, two, and three-day sections. He’s done about 600 miles, all in Southern California.

PUC Offers the College Support You Need

Starting college can be challenging, but at Pacific Union College, we have great resources in place to help students succeed. There are several invaluable resources and support services at your disposal when you’re a PUC student and if you’re struggling with something, it’s important to remember you aren’t alone. There are people in place who are available to answer your questions or provide you with additional information—you just need to ask for help.

What tutoring is available at PUC?

Yes! Our Teaching & Learning Center offers free group tutoring in over 25 different subjects, ranging from business to languages to science. Most lower-division GE courses have tutoring options available. If you’re struggling with a class but don’t see a tutoring option available, talk with the helpful TLC staff and they can set you up with a small group or an individual tutor. There’s also a writing lab available to students who would like input and direction on writing papers—it’s a great service and one you should absolutely take advantage of!

Learn more about the Teaching & Learning Center.

What can I do at the library besides study and check out books?

In the age of Google, a lot of people think libraries are obsolete, but that’s definitely not the case! At PUC’s Nelson Memorial Library, books reside there of course, but also online databases, academic search engines, journal articles, and periodicals. Through the library, students have access to over 30,000 journals and 100,000 ebooks, and over four million books through interlibrary loan services. If you need to use a computer, there are also about 60 public workstations available within the library and the computer lab areas, along with large group study rooms if you need a place to study with friends for that Anatomy test. There are also very knowledgeable librarians available to help you navigate all of these resources, so don’t be afraid to ask for help!

Get helpful tips for using PUC’s library.

Is there someone who can help me with registering for classes?

Once you’re a student at PUC, you will be assigned an advisor in the area you’re studying. For example, if you’re planning to study business, your advisor will be a professor in the department of business (helpful, right?). Your advisor knows the ins and outs of their department’s programs and will be a valuable source for any questions you have about what classes you should take, what major you should consider for your career path, and more. Every quarter your advisor will need to approve your schedule, which is a great safety net for making sure you stay on track to complete your degree! For undecided students, the TLC has an undeclared student advisor who will work with you on what general education classes to take while you figure out what to major in.

If I don’t know what I want to study, is there someone at PUC who can help me?

Some of you may not know what you plan to study yet, and PUC’s Career & Counseling Center can help you figure out the path you want to be on. They have a career counselor who can give you a career test and one-on-one help with career counseling. If already you have an idea of what career you want but aren’t sure how to get there, they can help you with your resume, cover letter, and even conduct some mock job interviews with you. There’s also an annual Career Fair, held every winter quarter, where you can meet with professionals from many different industries to network and learn more about the possibilities available after college. It’s a great event to provide you with a chance to see how your education at PUC can help you continue on to new and exciting places.

Meet Sydney Johnson, PUC’s career counselor.

What services are there if I get sick?

Did you know PUC has a free health clinic available to students? It’s true! Health Services provides students with a wide array of services, including appointments with a physician, physician’s assistant, or a nurse, along with medications (both prescription and over-the-counter), medical supplies, and diagnostic in-clinic testing. The Health Services clinic strives to be a welcoming professional place offering the highest quality of care possible, and wants your experience here at PUC to be a happy and healthy one! We are so thankful to have the clinic on our campus to provide our students with excellent care when they need it.

Get to know PUC’s Health Services clinic.

If you have questions about the student resources and support services available to PUC students, you can talk with one of our knowledgeable admissions counselors, who can give you more information. Call (800) 862-7080, option 2 or email admissions@puc.edu to get connected with a counselor now.

A Hot Meal & A Prayer: Students Serve the Homeless

Homeless Ministries at People’s Park in Berkeley.

By Becky St. Clair

One Friday night business administration major George Grigsby was serving food for AfterLite, a post-vespers event designed to encourage student fellowship, he was approached by fellow student John Roberts, asking for any leftovers.

“I asked him what he needed them for, and that’s when I learned about the Clearlake Ministry,” Grigsby says.

Roberts was the leader of the ministry at that time, and he encouraged Grigsby to accompany them. The ministry, run by PUC students, provides both hot and nonperishable food, hygiene items, clothing, and prayer to persons experiencing homelessness on the streets of Clearlake, California. This year, Grigsby is the ministry leader, taking around five fellow students with him every other week to connect with anyone they can find.

“It’s getting harder to reach them because the local law enforcement is stepping up their efforts to disperse the city’s homeless,” Grigsby explains. “So instead of the 75-100 we used to serve there, we now see only 15-30 each time, and we have to drive around to various locations to find them.”

When they do connect with someone, Grigsby and his team make sure to inquire about needs they might be able to fill the next time they come. The top three requested items, especially this time of year when it’s chilly, are sweaters, sleeping bags, and socks.

Howell Mountain Market contributes groceries for the Clearlake Ministry team, and Grigsby spends a bit of time each day putting the bags together so it doesn’t add up to one long night of doing it all. Then he and his student team get together and cook hot food, as well.

“This ministry gives me a chance to put myself in a situation where I can make things better,” Grigsby explains. Growing up in West Africa, he felt very deeply the tragedy that occurred when Ebola broke out there in 2014.

“The people I grew up with were suffering, and I couldn’t do anything about it,” he recalls. “If I can’t make a difference there, I will help the people around me. Clearlake gives me a chance to do that.”

As a sophomore, Kevin Martins, junior biology and pre-med major, had seen Homeless Ministries listed in the “This Week at PUC” emails many times, and when he happened to meet the student director of the Berkeley Ministry to the homeless, he decided to give it a try.

“I really enjoyed the experience of preparing and serving food for others,” he says. “They’re usually just there alone and really enjoy having someone notice them and listen to what they have to say.”

When the ministry leader graduated, Martins stepped up and took over. Every other Sabbath the team of around 15 pile into a large van and attend church and eat potluck with the Adventist church in Berkeley. After potluck, they prepare food in the church’s kitchen to serve the homeless in a place called People’s Park. They serve food, talk with the people, find out their needs and make lists for next time they come, and pray with those who are willing.

“When we’re at the church I organize the group to make sure everyone has a role,” Martins explains. “Everyone has their skills and strengths, and we work together well, making sure everything happens that needs to.”

The group typically serves around 50 homeless, but recently new tents appeared at the park, and Martins made notes to prepare food for 70 the next time they came. Once they serve within the main part of the park, they carry plates around to other areas of the park to serve those who didn’t make it to the table.

Martins has participated in an Amen Clinic previously, and it sparked his interest in serving others. He intends to continue doing so even once he starts his career.

“I want to be a doctor because I want to help people in their healing,” he says. “This ministry has helped me see this is, in fact, what I want to do with my life.”

It’s the stories that affect Martins most. One week he met a woman in a wheelchair who had spent many years living in Brazil, Martins’ home. They began speaking in Portuguese, and she shared her struggles with him.

“She explained to me how being disabled makes being homeless even harder,” he says. “Sometimes she is harassed by other homeless people, and once she and her wheelchair were even set on fire. The things she tells me inspire me to keep going back.”

Martins, like Grigsby, says a majority of the requests they receive from those they serve are for basic hygiene items such as toothbrushes and shaving cream, as well as warm clothing such as socks and jackets.

Both ministries accept donations toward supplies as well as donations of time to prepare and/or serve. Since not everyone has cooking skills, they invite those who do to contribute their skills to serve others. Whether it’s helping prepare the food or delivering pre-cooked meals, both ministries welcome contributions.

“These ministries give us a chance to see beyond ourselves,” he says. “The present need of others isn’t someone else’s problem, it’s everyone’s problem. And if we don’t know what’s going on around us, we can’t help.”

Hygiene kits or supplies for them, clothes—especially socks, gloves, hats, and coats—and money toward gas and food are always appreciated. Anyone who wishes to accompany the groups to Berkeley or Clearlake can reach out to Grigsby and Martins for a schedule and instructions. Drivers are also needed, as two current drivers are graduating this spring. Although worship credit is available for this ministry, both Grigsby and Martins encourage student participants to focus on the serving rather than the credit.

“The purpose is to take a look at your life and realize all you have and how you can give from that to those who don’t have,” Grigsby says. “If you can help make a difference for someone not doing as well, you should. It’s the selflessness of giving and what you learn from the experience that is most important.”

A new part of this ministry that Martins would like to start is bringing musicians to provide live music for the people as they eat. If you play an instrument and are interested in being part of ministry in this way, let Martins know. If you are interested in contributing to either of these ministries in any way, contact Grigsby at gggrigsby@puc.edu or Martins at knmartins@puc.edu.

“We’re so fortunate, and we need to give whenever we get the chance,” Martins comments. “This is that chance.”

Editor’s note: The following is a list of items needed the most by Homeless Ministries. Toothbrushes, toothpaste, shaving cream, shaving razors, sanitary pads, soap bars, deodorant, tissues, wet wipes, towels, and other personal hygiene items. Food, clothes, and cash donations are always greatly needed and appreciated. 

Get the Answers to Your Residential Life Questions

There’s a high chance moving into your new dorm room the first weekend in college will be your first experience living “on your own” away from home. For some, it’s very exciting but for others, it can be a little overwhelming. However you feel about it, you’re bound to have some questions about what it’s like to live at PUC. Here are five of the most commonly asked questions about life in one of our six residence halls.

How are rooms in the residence halls assigned?

Once you’re accepted, you will need to pay a $200 deposit and fill out a housing reservation form, letting us know of your plans. Rooms are assigned in the order they’re received, so it’s a good idea to do this as soon a possible! Paying your deposit also makes you eligible to register for classes (starting in April). Room assignments are sent out during the summer.

Learn more about what to do after you’re accepted at puc.edu/alreadyaccepted.

What if I don’t get along with my roommate?

Whether you’re rooming with a friend you’ve known for years or someone you don’t know, you’re guaranteed to have a difference of opinion every once in a while. Try talking the issue through with them, and if needed, you can also talk with your RA or your dean. If you truly feel you can’t work it out, you always have the option to switch to another room, so don’t feel stuck.

Read our “Three Ways to Solve Issues with Your Roommate” post for ideas on how to navigate possible issues that might arise while having a roommate.

Speaking of RA’s and deans, what’s an RA and who is my dean?

Each residence hall has a dean who lives in the building. They have a team of RAs or residence assistants, who work with them to ensure each student within their dorm is having the best experience possible. Their goal is for each student to feel like they’re part of the special Pioneer family.  

Check out the dean profiles on our blog to get to know each of the seven awesome people who work as deans in PUC’s residence halls! One of them may end up being yours! When you get your room assignment in the summer, you’ll also learn who your dean is, and can reach out to them with any questions you might have about your room.

What will I need in my dorm room?

Each residence halls room contains two beds, dresser drawers, closets, desks and chairs, and one sink with a mirror. However, figuring out what else you’ll need to pack and bring to college can be difficult so to make it easier we came up with a packing list to help.

Read our “Your College Packing List” post for ideas about what you probably should bring with you for your move up to PUC!

What dorm activities I can be involved in?

There’s always a lot going on in the residence halls, and you can be as involved as you want! There are weekly worship events your RA will hold for your hall, and usually an all-dorm worship too. The same goes for socials, like movie nights or spa nights. In the men’s residence halls, there’s almost always a group surrounding the lobby TV watching a sports game. Many dorms also do pancake breakfasts or brunch on the weekends. You can also grab a friend and hit the sauna in Newton (for men) or blow off some steam in Andre’s workout room (for women).

PUC has a team of amazing residence hall deans, RAs, and desk workers who can’t wait to get to know you. We’re excited to have you on campus soon! If you have questions about the dorms or your housing before you get here, call (800) 862-7080, option 2 or email admissions@puc.edu to get connected with one of our admissions counselors for help!

Spotlight on PUC Scholarships

Have you looked at the scholarships PUC offers yet? I encourage you to take a look at PUC and what we can offer you—it might surprise you! For example, did you know each year, we award over $30 million dollars in financial aid to our students? That’s a lot of money!

When you look at the costs for college, it’s important to keep in mind 100 percent of PUC students receive one or more forms of financial aid. Don’t feel discouraged by the sticker price! We are committed to working together with you and your family to make a high-quality Adventist college experience possible to help you on your journey to reach your academic goals and dreams, whether it’s through scholarships, grants, or helping you understand the loan options available to you. When taken wisely, loans are a helpful resource that enables students to access a great education, complete a degree, and enter the workforce prepared for their career. Did you know on average, students with bachelor’s degrees earn over $1 million more in their lifetime than those with only high school diplomas? College is absolutely a worthwhile investment!

On the scholarship topic, PUC offers scholarships based on a variety of factors, including leadership, participation in music groups or athletic programs, and of course high GPA and high test scores. There are also scholarships available depending on your program of study, like the Adventist Mission Scholarship, available to theology and education majors. Visit puc.edu/scholarships to see all available scholarships.

In particular, I want to highlight PUC’s merit scholarships, awarded through the President’s, Dean’s, Trustee’s, and Founder’s scholarships, which are based on unweighted cumulative GPA and test scores and are automatically given to students who meet the necessary criteria.

President’s Scholarship (Renewable with a 3.0 GPA)
3.75-4.0 GPA or 29+ ACT / 1350+ SAT
$13,000 / 4-Year Total: $52,000

Dean’s Scholarship (Renewable with a 3.0 GPA)
3.5-3.74 GPA or 26+ ACT / 1200+ SAT
$12,000 / 4-Year Total: $48,000

Trustee’s Scholarship (Renewable with a 3.0 GPA)
3.25-3.49 GPA
$10,000 / 4-Year Total: $40,000

Founder’s Scholarship (Renewable with a 3.0 GPA)
3.0-3.24 GPA
$9,000 / 4-Year Total: $36,000

For high-achieving students, PUC offers the prestigious Maxwell Scholarship, worth up to a whopping $116,000. That’s no joke! Students meeting qualifications receive full tuition based on their unweighted cumulative GPA and test scores; requirements are a 3.9-4.0 GPA and a 34+ ACT or 1500+ SAT.

There are also several other PUC scholarships worth checking out, like the Legacy Scholarship for students whose parents attended PUC, and the Mostert Leadership Scholarship, which recognizes students for selected leadership roles held during their junior and/or senior years. Visit puc.edu/scholarships to see all available scholarships. If you have questions about what you might qualify for, don’t hesitate to reach out to our team of financial aid counselors, who can give you a financial aid estimate that shows what it might cost for you to attend PUC. It’s really helpful! Call (800) 862-7080, option 1 or email studentfinance@puc.edu to talk with a counselor now.

25 Scholarships to Apply for Right Now

Did you know there are literally thousands of outside scholarships you can apply for? Some of them have serious requirements like GPA requirements or essays while others are more fun and involve being creative, like putting together a video PSA or creating a greeting card. Here is a list of 25 scholarships open to high school seniors with application deadlines this winter and spring—and even a few into the summer, for those of you who need a little extra time.

Don’t forget to also check out PUC’s scholarships at puc.edu/scholarships!

The Christophers Annual Poster Contest Scholarship
Deadline: February 18, 2019
Award amount: $1,000

Another scholarship for artistic students, this scholarship asks students to create a poster interpreting the theme of “One Person Can Make a Difference.” There are also monetary prizes for second and third place, as well as up to five honorable mentions.

The Vegetarian Resource Group Scholarship
Deadline: February 20, 2019
Award amount: $10,000

To apply for this scholarship, applicants need to have demonstrated “compassion, courage, and a strong commitment to promoting a peaceful world through a vegetarian diet/lifestyle.” Two runners-up will receive $5,000 each.

DoSomething.org’s Not-So-Secret Admirer Scholarship
Deadline: February 21, 2019
Award amount: $5,000

It only takes one person to help someone follow through on their passions. That person could be you! Send one friend an encouraging message about pursuing their passion, and you’ll be entered to win a $5,000 scholarship.

The Taco Bell Live Más Scholarship
Deadline: February 21, 2019
Award amount: $25,000

This creative scholarship only requires you to submit a video (two minutes or less in length) that tells the story of your life’s passion. It could be a short film, animation, or just a simple testimonial. Awards range from $5,000 to $25,000.

The Asian Pacific Fund Scholarship
Deadline: February 26, 2019
Award amount: $5,000

For this scholarship, applicants must be of Asian and/or Pacific Islander ethnicity (as defined by the U.S. Census); be the first in their immediate family to attend college; have a minimum GPA of 2.80; demonstrate financial need; and be a resident of California, with preference given to Bay Area residents. Two second place winners receive $2,500.

The Spirit of Anne Frank Scholarship
Deadline: February 28, 2019
Award amount: $5,000

To commemorate what would have been Anne Frank’s 90th birthday, this scholarship asks applicants to write a 1,000-word essay sharing how Anne’s legacy inspired them to take action in their community, school, or among peers.

The Toyota Teen Video Challenge
Deadline: February 28, 2019
Award amount: $15,000

If you’re into making videos, this is the scholarship for you! Create a video encouraging teens to drive safer, and you could win $15,000. Another sweet perk? If you win, you also get to work with a film crew to reshoot your video entry into a PSA to be aired on TV! Second place also nets you $10,000, and third place receives $7,500.

Unigo’s Sweet and Simple Scholarship
Deadline: February 28, 2019
Award amount: $1,500

Applicants are asked to respond to the following writing prompt: “Not every gift has to be expensive or extravagant. In fact, sometimes it’s the sweet and simple things that make a real difference in our lives. Think back and tell us about something you received as a gift and why it meant so much to you.” Entries must be 250 words or less.

The Create-A-Greeting-Card Scholarship
Deadline: March 1, 2019
Award amount: $10,000

Calling all artists! It’s worth taking the time to apply for this scholarship. Applicants must submit a design for the front of a Christmas card, holiday card, birthday card, or all-occasion card and the winning entry will be made and sold as a real greeting card!

The Project Yellow Light Scholarship
Deadline: March 1, 2019*
Award amount: $5,000

In honor of Hunter Garner, who was killed in a car accident, this scholarship asks students to create a video to encourage teens not to drive distracted. The winner receives a $5,000 scholarship, while the second place winner receives $2,000. Third place gets you $1,000. There are additional scholarships students can enter if they create a billboard or radio spot on the same topic. (*Note: Billboard entries are due March 1 while the video and radio entries are due April 1)

The Doodle for Google Scholarship
Deadline: March 18, 2019
Award amount: $30,000

Perhaps one of the coolest scholarships out there, the Doodle for Google scholarship asks applicants to create a doodle using any materials they want for a chance to win a $30,000 scholarship! Applicants also have to write a statement about their doodle and how it represents something that inspires them. In addition to the $30,000 scholarship, the grand prize winner has their doodle displayed on Google’s website for a day; earns a trip to Google headquarters in California; receives fun Googley swag, and their school receives a $50,000 technology package. Four national finalists are also chosen and each receives a $5,000 scholarship.

DoSomething.org’s Supplies, Sealed, Delivered Scholarship
Deadline: March 31, 2019
Award amount: $5,000

On any given day, there are almost 600,000 people experiencing homelessness in America. About one-quarter of them are teenagers or children. Now you can join the movement by providing daily essentials (like toothbrushes, toothpaste, soap, and nonperishable foods) to a local homeless shelter. Plus, you’ll be eligible to win a $5,000 scholarship!

Unigo’s Superpower Scholarship
Deadline: March 31, 2019
Award amount: $2,500

How many of us have daydreamed about what we would do if we had a superpower? The possibilities are endless. This short essay contest asks students to answer the question “Which superhero or villain would you want to change places with for a day and why?”

The Frame My Future Scholarship
Deadline: April 1, 2019
Award amount: $5,000

Applicants must submit a collage, drawing, graphic design piece, painting, photograph, poem or another creative entry discussing what they hope to achieve in both their personal and professional life after college. The grand prize winner receives a $5,000 scholarship while the first runner-up receives a $1,000 scholarship, and the second runner-up receives a $500 scholarship.

The Sports Unlimited Annual Scholarship
Deadline: April 25, 2019
Award amount: $1,000

Write an essay between 500 and 1,000 words about what changes to sports and/or sports equipment you think we will see in the next 10 years and why for a chance to win a $1,000 scholarship.

Unigo’s All About Education Scholarship
Deadline: April 30, 2019
Award amount: $3,000

One of the largest scholarships Unigo offers, this one asks you to write a short essay (250 words or less) in response to the question “How will a $3,000 scholarship for education make a difference in your life?”

A Voice for Animals Scholarship
Deadline: April 30, 2019
Award amount: Varies

For this scholarship, you can write an essay or submit a photo or video to promote the humane treatment of animals. Awards vary by tier, with the top award being $500.

The Momentrix College Scholarship
Deadline: May 15, 2019
Award amount: $1,000

For this scholarship, you write an essay of 2,000 characters or less (approximately 400 words) about what test preparation practices work best for you and why. There are first, second, and third place prizes of $1,000, $500, and $250, respectively.

The Krylon Clear Choice Art Scholarship
Deadline: May 31, 2019
Award amount: $1,000

This scholarship awards five winners $1,000 each, as well as gives each winner’s school a $500 grant and Krylon supplies. To apply, you must submit a portfolio, an artistic statement, a letter of reference, and your transcripts.

Unigo’s Fifth Month Scholarship
Deadline: May 31, 2019
Award amount: $1,500

In celebration of the fifth month of the year, this short scholarship essay asks you to write a response to the following, in 250 words or less: “May is the fifth month of the year. Write a letter to the number five explaining why five is important. Be serious or be funny. Either way, here’s a high five to you for being original.”

Unigo’s Do-Over Scholarship
Deadline: June 30, 2019
Award amount: $1,500

This scholarship asks you to write a short essay (250 words or less) in response to the question “If you could get one ‘do-over’ in life, what would it be and why?”

The Stuck at Prom Scholarship
Deadline: July 9, 2019
Award amount: $10,000

This scholarship is probably one of the most famous college scholarships! To enter, students must create outfits made entirely of Duck brand duct tape to be worn to prom. Two entries will be chosen for the grand prize of $10,000; one for the dress category and the other for the tux category. Eight runners up will receive $500 apiece.

The Harold G. Henderson Haiku Contest
Deadline: July 31, 2019
Award amount: Varies

If you have a way with words, this scholarship may be for you. Created in memory of Harold G. Henderson, the co-founder of the Haiku Society of America, applicants must submit five unpublished haikus. The winner receives $150, and their haiku will be published in the Frogpond magazine and on the Haiku Society of America’s website. Second prize receives $100 and third prize $50.

Unigo’s Flavor of the Month Scholarship
Deadline: July 31, 2019
Award amount: $1,500

Another short essay scholarship, this one asks you to write in 250 words or less a response to the question “If you were an ice cream flavor, which would you be and why?”

Unigo’s Make Me Laugh Scholarship
Deadline: August 31, 2019
Award amount: $1,500

Another great scholarship from Unigo, this one asks you to write in 250 words or less a response to the following writing prompt: “OMG… finding and applying for scholarships is serious business, but it’s time to lighten things up a little. We don’t want to know why you deserve $1,500 or how great your grades are, we simply want to LOL. Describe an incident in your life, funny or embarrassing (fact or fiction), and make us laugh!”

If none of these scholarships are appealing to you, simply do a little Google search to see what more you can find! There’s bound to be a scholarship available in your field of interest. And as always, our Student Finance team is here to help if you have questions about other places you can look to find additional scholarships to help make college affordable. Call (800) 862-7080, option 1 or email studentfinance@puc.edu to get connected with a financial aid counselor now.

There’s More to Academics Than Picking a Major

Part of choosing a college involves thinking about what program you want to study. With over 70 degrees and programs offered at PUC, whatever your passion, we’ve got a program for you! (Pssst! You can learn more about all of the college’s programs at puc.edu/academics.)

There’s also a lot more to academics than deciding on your major. Here are five academic-related questions students frequently ask during PUC’s admissions process. Reach out to PUC’s team of admissions counselors if you have additional questions or need clarification on anything!

What does the typical day of a college student look like?

Every day will probably be different! Sorry, it’s a frustrating answer, but it’s the truth. Most classes at PUC meet three or four times a week, so you’ll likely have different classes on different days. Some classes are an hour, while others might be three hours (like a lab). Depending on your schedule, you might have classes all in the morning or all in the afternoon. You’ll have lots of free time, but it’s important to balance your time well. Which leads to the next question …

How much should I plan to study each week?

As a general rule of thumb, most professors say college students should expect to spend about two hours studying per week for each credit hour they take. A full load at PUC is considered to be 16 credits, which means about 16 hours of your week is spent in class, and you should try to block out about 32 hours a week to prepare for classes. Class prep includes homework, reading, and any other assignments. Don’t panic though, you probably won’t spend all that time studying, as it can fluctuate based on papers, projects, and other things. To give you a better idea of what to expect, USA Today found the average college student spends about 17 hours per week preparing for their classes.

What if I don’t know what I want to study?

Don’t worry if you haven’t picked a major yet! You’ll be fine. Research suggests as many as 80 percent of college students change their major at least once, while the average student changes their major up to three times. Understandably then, many students come to college without knowing exactly what they want to study.

The beauty of PUC being a liberal arts college is you will need to take classes in many different subjects to fulfill your General Education requirements (You can read more about those in the “What on Earth are General Education Requirements?!” blog post). This is the perfect way to try something new while learning about your strengths to see whether or not you’re interested in a subject enough to major in it. Each quarter, there are hundreds of class options available to you, including classes on such topics as business law, fencing, American government, ceramics, anatomy, Christian ethics, creative writing, computer programming, and so much more.

If you’re struggling to see where your future is headed, there are also many resources available to you at PUC. Through the Career and Counseling Center, you’ll have access to multiple personality tests, interest surveys, and our career counselor will happily give you one-on-one career counseling. We’ll help you find where God is calling you.

Learn more about PUC’s Career and Counseling Center.

What academic resources does PUC have to help me with my studies?

The Teaching and Learning Center (TLC) offers free group tutoring Sunday through Thursday for more than 25 different courses, ranging from business to languages to science. Most lower-division GE courses have tutoring options available. If you’re struggling with a class but don’t see a tutoring option available, talk with the helpful TLC staff and they can set you up with a small group or an individual tutor. There’s also a writing lab available to students who would like input and direction on writing papers—take advantage of this service!

For those with a learning disability, be sure to contact the disabilities support service coordinator in the TLC when you are on campus to learn more about the accommodations we provide.

Learn more about PUC’s Teaching and Learning Center.

How do I register for classes?

For your first quarter, you’ll work with your admissions counselor to get registered for classes. Then, once you’re a student, you will be assigned an advisor in the area you’re studying. For example, if you’re planning to study business, your advisor will be a professor in the department of business (helpful, right?). Your advisor knows the ins and outs of their department’s programs and will be a valuable source for any questions you have about what classes you should take, what major you should consider for your career path, and more. Every quarter your advisor will need to approve your schedule, which is a great safety net for making sure you stay on track to complete your degree!

We have a team of five amazing admissions counselors ready to help you throughout the application process with any questions you have along the way, whether you have questions about admissions requirements, financial aid, or one of PUC’s academic programs. Call (800) 862-7080, option 2 or email admissions@puc.edu to get connected with one now!