Explore Outside the Classroom

By Kaleb Zenk

So, you’re the type of person who is excited to finally graduate from high school and escape the tight-knit rule your parents have had over you since the dawning of time. You’re excited for the possibilities of beginning a new life abroad, forging new relationships and learning communities, and ready to adapt to that inner self-reliance. You’re ready to own the next four years and have fun!

Or

You’re the opposite of excited for what lies beyond high school. Your parents have been your best friends your entire life, and living in a comfortable space, totally and completely content of the decisions made on your behalf, give you sense of consistency and routine. Inherently, you want to learn, have fun, and enjoy new relationships, but the steps to get to a place of comfortability in a new environment gives you anxiety!  

Rest assured

No matter how you react to the big leap from high school to college, the beauty of this transition lies not only in what you learn in the classroom, but what you can learn beyond it. No matter the style of personality you have when stepping onto campus for the first time, there is assuredly a place for you anywhere and anytime that you can feel comfortable in, making college a home away from home.

Photo courtesy of RecRadio.org

Intramurals

Although staying inside and playing League of Legends on your PC is a great community-building activity, playing sports is also a fantastic way to get outside and meet other people. Here at PUC, we have several intramural sports teams, ranging from badminton to flag football. We’re passionate about our small and diverse community, and it’s truly an amazing opportunity to learn from the multifaceted backgrounds you’ll encounter here. As such, sports can help anyone integrate. But the arena of physical activity and coordination may not be your thing, and that’s totally fine! There are other fantastic opportunities waiting for you once you arrive here.

Internships

Feel free to scroll past this next one if you’re pursuing a pre-professional program—or don’t!

Like myself and a few others here at PUC who happen to not be enrolled in a pre-professional program, landing an internship is quintessential for getting the ball rolling immediately after, or before your college experience ends. It’s also a fantastic way to develop your skills outside the classroom and meet thought leaders in your respective field of study.

If you haven’t perused Craigslist, Glassdoor, or LinkedIn in search of an internship opportunity, give it a try! LinkedIn in particular will become your best friend as you search for that perfect opportunity that aligns with your skill sets. You can follow thought leaders in your field, apply to job descriptions that are screaming your name, or just learn a bit more about the professional environment!

Explore places you’ve never been before!

PUC’s location is prime for several reasons—we’re nestled atop a mountain far, far away, sure …  but we’re a short 1.5-hour drive to the beautiful and illustrious city of San Francisco. Pier 39, Mission Dolores Park, Market Street, eateries galore, etc. You’ll never run out of things to do in SF, as there are attractions for everyone!

A fun fact: As of recently, various startups in the Bay Area such as Lime or Bird have provided the city with electric scooters to those who want to adventure, but don’t want to spend their money on Uber or Lyft. Simply download the app, enter your payment information, and you’re good to go!

Scooters cost an initial $1 to unlock, and a subsequent .15 cents per mile thereafter. Ride down the Embarcadero to grab a coffee or latte at Blue Bottle and a delicious tacro— taco croissant— from Vive La Tarte at the Ferry Building!

If you’re interested in events and meeting new people, check out SF fun cheap or SF Station. They’re great resources with a list of upcoming events if you’re into music, comedy, theater, etc.

No matter what …

There are so many opportunities at PUC to get involved, whether locally or right here on campus. Feel free to reach out to upperclassmen or anyone who knows the area, because they’d be glad to provide you with some hints and tips for making the most out of living in the Napa Valley. Most importantly, college is an extremely exciting time of your life, and the opportunities to stay busy and have fun are endless! It may take a bit of networking, researching, and putting your best foot forward, but you can truly make your time at PUC one of the best experiences of your life.

The Grind: A Showcase of a Student Job on Campus

By Michael Morales

What’s something everyone worries about when first starting life at a new school? I’ll tell you: Meeting. New. People. Even if you manage to get out there and meet new people, there’s no guarantee your schedule will allow you to maintain those friendships! Meeting new people is definitely a stressful part of college. However, it can also be one of the most memorable things about your college experience. If you find yourself nodding your head while reading the above statements, have I got a tip for you!

Try applying for a job in the Grind—the quaint little coffee shop located inside the Campus Center! Why do I suggest working at a coffee shop is a good way to meet people? Here’s a list of reasons I compiled from simply being a barista myself:

The Coffee

One of the perks of being a Grind employee is the fact you get to surround yourself with a drink that makes the world go around—coffee. Working as a barista really opens your mind to the world of coffee and the drinks involved in it. Trust me, you’ll easily be able to explain to your friends the difference between a caramel latte and a caramel macchiato. After being immersed in coffee culture, you can use that as a talking point with other coffee enthusiasts on campus (of which there are many).

The Customer Service

A great skill working at the Grind will help you develop is a positive work ethic and cheerful attitude towards customers. Since you’ll be a barista/cashier employee, you have the chance to make a service interaction truly memorable and personal. If a person is unsure about what to order, you can use your developed coffee knowledge to recommend a drink that suits the customer. Before long, you might see the faces of people who come often to get their coffee fix. You can learn their name, their favorite drink, and even become good friends!

The Team

Apart from being a master barista with a knack for good service, is perhaps the best part of working at the Grind—your team. Your co-workers have got your back whenever you need them, and they know you got theirs too. Each person is so unique with their own set of skills that makes the Grind a truly unique work experience. Some can dance, some can stock items like a beast, and some can make drinks faster than you can say “Man, I love Colloquy!”

Overall, the Grind is a great place to work if you’re eager to meet new people at PUC. You meet customers and co-workers alike, each with their own personality traits that makes the student body so diverse. Not to mention you get to say “Yeah, I’m a barista now” to anyone you meet. That, in and of itself, should be motivation enough to get out there and give it a shot! Who knows, you might find yourself loving it a latte.

Life as a C.C. Sports Writer

By Andrew Kim

When I think about sports, sports are more than physical activities that occur for entertainment purposes, keeping people healthy, and building character. Sports serve as one of many crucial elements of everyday life that keeps athletes, fans, and society energized, emotional, motivated, and inspired in life. When journalists report on sports stories, they share the same passion with sports fans and athletes. That’s the main reason why I am a communication major here at PUC with plans on becoming a sports journalist so I, too, can share my passion and enthusiasm of sports I follow on a daily basis. In addition, I knew to continue to build towards my future path, I needed to gain experience in learning and writing about sports. That all was reaffirmed when I joined the staff of the Campus Chronicle, PUC’s student-run newspaper.

The first time I heard of the Campus Chronicle here at PUC was during my first week as a freshman, when I visited the Chronicle offices at the Campus Center to gain an idea of what the organization was like and how they reported on story ideas on a weekly basis. It was not until the following year as a sophomore, where I spent my freshman year attending meetings but not proposing any sports stories then, where I decided to write my first sports article, which was about NASCAR and a racing event that recently occurred. Because of my childhood obsession of NASCAR, I knew a lot about NASCAR and I thought writing about it for the Chronicle would be perfect enough for me to do on a regular basis. Little did I know I had a lot more about sports writing and reporting to learn.

There were mixed emotions after my NASCAR article was published in the following Campus Chronicle edition. Part of me was happy with what I wrote and published for the first time for the Chronicle, but there was another part of me that felt like the Chronicle would not be overly excited about me only writing about NASCAR on a continuous basis. I knew for my next assignment, I would have to learn more about other sports. That was when I decided to learn about the PUC Pioneers, the college’s sporting teams from volleyball to basketball, and familiarize myself with their code of language, names of the athletes, the rules of the game, and what highlights to mention when writing.

I decided my first PUC Pioneers article I would write about would be a preview edition for the Pioneers heading into the 2017/18 season. I visited the Pioneers website and analyzed the Pioneers’ stats from last season, among which included how many games they won or lost and how close they came in making the Cal Pac tournament. I then turned my attention to the roster to know who represents the Pioneers in what sport, mention any newcomers to the Pioneers family, and break down the schedule for the upcoming season. Researching online and communicating with key Pioneer staffs that included coaches Greg Rahn and George Glover along with Brittany Brown, the athletics director, provided for me a clear background on sports that included basketball, volleyball, and cross country. After turning in the article, I felt both relieved and pleased with my first completed task as a Campus Chronicle sports writer, but also knew that this was only the beginning.

The next task I took, when writing about sports for Campus Chronicle, occurred on January 15, 2018, where I participated and reported my first Pioneers men’s basketball home game against UC Santa Cruz. Throughout the first half of the game, I kept track of the number of points made by each team, who contributed to scoring a point, and thought it would be a piece of cake. Then, someone gave me an official report sheet that covered the shots and stats of each player. By the time the game ended, I left with mixed emotions, one feeling happy for the Pioneers winning the game and having a lot to recap and write about the game, but also disappointed and felt I came unprepared and did not know what some of the stats meant. On the bright side, the game provided a general overview of what specifics, stats, and top plays to cover throughout an event and the importance of writing based on my knowledge of sports. The first game encouraged for me to participate in more games to familiarize myself with the Pioneers’ environment and the significance of their endless fight in making championship runs as underdogs. The more I went, the more I came back having more to write about the Pioneers and their top highlights from each game, along with including interviews with coaches and featured athletes. Even in times where I did not travel out to a Pioneers game, I spent a majority of my spare time following sports, both at PUC and out in the world, chronologically and familiarizing myself with what to cover or mention as a sports journalist.

Working for the Campus Chronicle as a sports writer has and continues to be a great learning experience. For starters, I am more familiarized with the PUC Pioneers and know more about their accomplishments compared to not knowing anything significant about them on my first day as a PUC student. Looking at the big picture, being a Chronicle sports writer provides for me a general view of the work sports journalists and broadcasters cover across the globe along with the resources, code of language, and overview they need to familiarize themselves with before, during, and after an event. Learning about different types of sports has lead me more in analyzing how to write and report on sports stories in a way where I can share the same enthusiasm, knowledge, and passion about sports.

How Being an Athlete Helped Me

By Lauren Purdom

Whenever I tell people I will be graduating from Pacific Union College, 90 percent of the time they have no idea as to its whereabouts. Coming from a highly populated city and high school, to joining the Pioneers was a major transition and adjustment for me. Not only was it in a city that barely had 4,000 people but it was on a hill. It is also a private Christian-based college affiliated with the Seventh-Day Adventist Church. I was born and raised in a city in Southern California and went to a high school with over 2,000 students. Can you imagine the hallways! Seeing how I have played sports all my life and continued by playing on PUC’s women’s volleyball team, I feel like that made my transition into such a small college a whole lot easier.

Sports and sports teams even are full of diversity. In a sense so is PUC. This is one of the major reasons why I was probably able to adapt to the college when got up here. I already had the skill set to meet new people and create bonds by getting to know people and hang out with them. It also made it easier because when you join a team you meet a lot of people from different backgrounds you automatically have something in common withplaying sports!

Another reason why being an athlete helped me with my transition was because I was faced with adversity before I even got to college. Nothing and nowhere is perfect so you are always going to face obstacles and challenges. I played multiple sports as a child and was on two sports teams in high school so I was dealing with a variety of personalities. Because of PUC’s diverse population, I encountered numerous amounts of individuals from all over the world. These students came from a list of backgrounds and all were unique in their own way.

All in all, I feel being an athlete all my life was beneficial towards my transition into becoming a student-athlete here at PUC. I can sincerely say that the skills you learn and develop when you are on a team or in a teamwork environment not only build your confidence but are everlasting and will definitely help you with future endeavors.

Department of Visual Arts Senior Thesis Projects

By Celeste Wong

We are extremely proud of our seniors and their thesis projects. Congrats!

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This year’s Senior Thesis Exhibition for visual arts students was held on Thursday, May 19th, in the Rasmussen Art Gallery, located between the Nelson Memorial Library and Paulin Hall.  The exhibition included the theses of 12 graduating visual arts majors ranging from fine art, graphic design, and photography.

For the film and television majors, they premiered their thesis films at the annual Diogenes Film Festival at the Cameo Cinema in St. Helena on Thursday, May 31. Three graduating film and television majors premiered their thesis films, along with other short films by other film students.

#pucart #pucfilm #diogenesfilmfestival #inspiringcreativecommunity

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These graduating seniors began their year-long project starting at the beginning of the 2017-2018 school year. At the beginning of the year, they have had to pitch their thesis ideas to the entire department of visual arts faculty for approval and have consistently worked from then until now. Students who are BFA students are expected to work on their projects for at least a whopping 300 hours, to give some perspective.

Fine Art

Sierra Driver
Graphic novel

Lexi Haylock
Found objects installation

“My thesis is titled ‘Homegrown.’ I wanted to capture my most intimate and cherished memories of growing up in the beautiful nature of Angwin. I was inspired by changes that will be occurring in my life as I graduate from PUC and move away from my childhood town. I’ve always been fascinated by the connection between emotion and memory. This project is my attempt at visually showing how the most prominent memories of my home have changed as I continue to grow.”

Chanel Lee
Diptych of large-scale watercolor paintings

Drew Macomber
Series of watercolor paintings

Laurel Williams
Assemblage installation

“My project is about technology, social media, and information, how these things are connected to education and about some of their negative effects on the development of children and youth today. I was inspired to do this because I’ve noticed there are higher levels of anxiety, depression, and stress amongst successive generations in America and I wondered if there might possibly be a common factor. It looks like that factor is how we tie the gathering of information or even education to success and put pressure on our students to ‘be successful.’ Increasingly over the decades, it has led to something called ‘play deprivation’ which can inhibit the development of youth in ways that counteract their preparation for a successful life. Hopefully, those who see my project will be inspired to rethink what success means to them and make better choices for themselves and their futures.”

Celeste Wong
Ceramics installation

“My project confronts and brings insight into what it means to be biracial or multiracial. I myself am multiracial and usually identify as just ‘American;’ however, this response is an answer that people find too vague. By blood I am half Filipino, quarter Chinese, and quarter Euro-American mix, to put it simply. Do I relate to any of these cultures? No, I do not; my parents were born and raised in America just like me. I started to open up about my frustration of finding my own ‘identity’ and in return, I found many bi/multiracial students on campus whom I’ve shared stories with. Included in my installation, I have quotes from more than 15 PUC students, sharing both the positive and negatives of being bi/multiracial, accompanied by expressive ceramic vessels.”

Graphic Design

Jenae Benson
Educational poster series, photographs, and handouts

“My thesis project is about raising awareness about the harms drugs have on a fetus of a pregnant mother. I was inspired by my mom because throughout her career as a school nurse she has told me heartbreaking stories about children who live a difficult life because they were drug exposed. My hope for this project is to make an impression on at least one person—that could be one baby’s life changed forever.”

Joshua Davis
Graphic novel

Giang Pham
Illustrated storybook

“My project is a storybook, loosely based on my own story revolving around the theme of relational struggles. I enjoy graphic novel, manga, and animation illustrations, so I wanted to make my own.”

Jackie Rivera
Hand-painted and designed signage installation

“As a letterer and designer, I’m really inspired by the letterforms and signage of the 20th century. For my thesis, I wanted to create a series of signs inspired by vintage signage I grew up seeing around small, historic Northern California towns. I wanted to learn about old sign making processes such as sign painting and woodworking. As a designer, learning about the history of graphic design is very important to me, and learning these old techniques has given me a much deeper appreciation and love for the career path I’ve chosen.”

Chad Smith
Series of digital paintings and parallax paintings

Photography

Alexis Howard
Photography series of vintage memorabilia

“My project is called ‘The Things She Left Behind’ and it is about photographing the things that belong to my great-grandmother. I was inspired by my great-grandmother and the impact she made in my life. So I wanted to do something to honor her.”

Film & Television

Rachel Ermshar

“My thesis is an exploration of growth, how we react and grow to different situations we end up in.”

Sarah Martinez

Gabriela Talevera

“My thesis is a documentary about the civil war in El Salvador. I was inspired by all the stories my mom would tell me about her childhood.”

After reading the highlights of some of the year-long projects these seniors have been working on, hopefully, you are inspired by these artists and filmmakers!

 

My Year as Editor-in-Chief of the Campus Chronicle

By Daniel Grigore

I never expected to join the Student Association at PUC, never expected to learn “inverted pyramid” writing and never expected to become as experienced at apology emails as I am now. However, all those “never thoughts” became a reality when, last winter quarter at PUC, my best friend persuaded me to run for a then-empty position: Editor-in-chief of the Campus Chronicle.

Now, three quarters into the year—and about three and a half weeks away from graduation—I have finally worked out a smoothly functioning system of production (sort of). Although I am proud of what I and my staff have accomplished, if I had been more aware of the steep learning curve that accompanies the adage “fake it till you make it,” I may have been more hesitant to run for office.

Nevertheless, I do not regret my time spent as editor-in-chief. In fact, I have had the opportunity to learn a great many things. I discovered em dashes, en dashes and hyphens are three distinct types of punctuation. Additionally, notice how the previous sentence is missing, a serial/Oxford comma—the comma that comes before “and” (also, note the hyphen and em dash in this sentence). The convoluted AP Style is really quite simple—if merely ignored and placed on the shelf next to APA, Chicago and Turabian (I am a full-blooded English major: “if it ain’t in MLA, then I don’t wanna play”).

A completely different approach to writing is not my only takeaway. I have learned interviews take planning weeks in advance and just one email is, contrary to my own preconceived notions, not the most effective way to obtain a timely response. Administration can be the biggest help or hindrance (thank you, President Cushman, you make life a breeze!) and faculty and staff are a goldmine when it comes to content.

Above all else, I think this leadership role has taught me communication is a major key to success—along with an enthusiastic and dedicated staff. If I cannot communicate my goals, ideas or expectations, how can my staff expect to produce a quality paper? How can my adviser trust I will be successful? How can I lead without a clear destination? I am very lucky my adviser and Chronicle crew were able to piece together a some sort of vision from my oftentimes questionable instructions. They deserve all my gratitude.

In retrospect, in the first issue compiled under my leadership almost one year ago, the section designated as the “Letter From the Editor” held the characteristic I wanted the Chronicle to most exemplify: honesty. In a world filled with “fake news” and fluctuating morals, the Chronicle was to be a solid and steadfast representation of life on campus as it is. I am proud to say I believe this standard of truthfulness has been met. To be just a little piece of PUC’s long and impressive legacy is an honor, and I am grateful for all the unforeseen schooling I received outside a classroom as editor-in-chief of the Campus Chronicle.

Interested in learning more about PUC’s Student Association? Check out our recent blog post about the 2018-2019 SA officers and start getting excited about next year!

PUC’s 2018-2019 Student Association Officers Elected

This week PUC elected a new group of student leaders for next school year to serve on the Student Association. Congratulations to each of them! We can’t wait to see the exciting things you accomplish next year.

We also wanted to take the time to briefly explain the various positions and what they do for the student body.

Kenzie Hardy was elected as SA president.

President
The leader of the SA team, this position acts as the liaison between the student body and the college’s administration. The president sets the tone for the year and supports the team in their duties, facilitating help and ideas when needed. The president is also responsible for several events each year, including one Colloquy service per quarter and weekly SA team meetings.

Amanda Musvosvi was elected as executive vice president.

Executive Vice President
The executive vice president presides over all Student Senate meetings, following the school constitution and bylaws. This critical role also oversees SA elections and serves as chair of the elections committee, and is responsible for holding quarterly town hall meetings to help keep the campus informed of Senate activities.

Financial Vice President
The financial vice president position is the backbone of the financial structure of SA. This position regularly advises each officer and the Student Senate regarding SA budgets, preparing monthly budgets for each officer and advising them on their status.

Daniel Arriaza was elected as religious vice president.

Religious Vice President
An integral part of the spiritual life of the college, the religious vice president works directly with the campus chaplain to secure guest speakers for Friday night vespers programming. This role also works with student leaders and the PUC Church worship pastor to schedule praise and worship praise teams to perform for vespers, and is responsible for the weeks of prayer held in winter and spring quarters.

Fatima Sosa was elected as social vice president.

Social Vice President
The social vice president position is responsible for scheduling and implementing a regular calendar of activities that encourage student participation, including larger events such as banquets and the annual Talent Show. This role also oversees a social committee and collaborates with campus club officers to help promote and provide opportunities for clubs. The social vice president also works closely with the director of student engagement and leadership to execute the fall “Week of WOW” events during the first week of school.

Public Relations & Marketing Vice President
The public relations and marketing vice president is responsible for running all SA social media accounts, including Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Snapchat, and promotion for each SA event, including posters and email graphics. This position hires photographers and videographers to create content for SA events and social media accounts, and assists other SA officers with marketing needs. The public relations and marketing vice president also designs the SA t-shirt for the year which coincides with the theme for the year.

Diogenes Lantern Editor
The Diogenes Lantern editor oversees the production of the school yearbook, which includes taking student, faculty, and staff portraits, as well as hiring staff to assist with design and layout and generating outside advertising income.

Campus Chronicle Editor
The Campus Chronicle editor is responsible for creating and publishing 16 issues of the newspaper each year, which includes writing content and hiring staff to assist with layout, photography, writing, and editing.

Video Producer
The video producer creates a minimum of four short films each quarter that highlight SA events and campus activities and culture, which includes hiring necessary staff to meet production goals and producing at least one creative short film project in conjunction with the Group Production class.