Category Archives: Faculty Friday

#FacultyFriday: Meet Patrick Benner

Some people are surprised to learn librarians are faculty, and they teach, too! Patrick Benner has been teaching college students how to find the resources they need since before the internet was a thing (sorry, Patrick!), and he’s really good at it. His office is really easy to find (at the end of the circulation desk in the library lobby), so pop in and say hi, or ask him a question. He’s also got some pretty cool technology toys (and relics!) in there. Go check it out!

Name: Patrick Benner
Title: Systems Librarian & Department Chair / Library Director
Email: pbenner@puc.edu
Faculty since: 1997

Classes Taught: All librarians teach as guest lecturers on information literacy—discerning good sources from poor sources, how to make use of the library’s extensive resources, and how to improve your search strategies and chances of finding what you are looking for. Each of us is assigned to work with certain departments. I work with all the fun ones which include Math, Physics, Chemistry, Aviation, Nursing, and Emergency Services.

Education: B.S. in computer science, Pacific Union College; M.L.I.S. from the University of California-San Jose

Where did you grow up, and what did you want to be when you grew up?

I was born in Sacramento General Hospital and grew up in the capital city, mainly the northern areas of Fair Oaks, Carmichael, and Citrus Heights. I remember as a little dude I wanted to be a scientist and later on an archeologist. As my relationship with God began to develop, I started aspiring to be a missionary. Yes, I read ALL the missionary story books by Josephine Cunnington Edwards and others. Years later I was overjoyed to be able to serve as a student missionary teaching math, science, English, and Bible.

So what made you want to become a librarian?

Someone bet my mother she couldn’t teach me to read before I was 3 years old. Big mistake. My mother rarely lost bets and according to her, by the time I was two and a half I had learned my alphabet and was reading. I remember stacks of word cards that started out small like “the” and “cat” and then went up to larger words like “something” and “purpose.” I have been an avid reader ever since. In the grocery store, I talked mom into buying me a copy of Alice in Wonderland I saw on a book rack when I was probably 8. I LOVED libraries but they were never close enough to where I lived. I was thrilled when I got to Junior High because the large campus for the 2,000 7th & 8th graders had their own library. I was constantly checking out books reading my way through each genre they had. Towards the end of my 7th-grade year, I had spent so much time in the library the librarian actually approached me and asked if I was interested in working there the next school year. Wow, I thought I had died and gone to book heaven!

What does a typical day look like for you?

A typical day for me is unpredictable. It may include things like helping a student find sources for a paper, answering tech support questions, gathering statistics for federal reports, dealing with a flood in the lower bathrooms, teaching a class in the computer lab, tracking down a bug in the code of the library room reservations website, attending administrative committee meetings, updating the Faculty Handbook, directing student workers, planning for future changes to our physical spaces, interacting with a multitude of vendors who supply us with many resources we subscribe to and purchase, troubleshooting malfunctioning printers, scanners, computers, or any of the associated software, buying equipment or repair tools or software or online databases, and, of course, answering phone calls and emails.

Where is your favorite spot in the PUC library?

I think it’s right here in my office because it’s close to the front lobby where the students come and go and it makes it easy for them to pop in to say “hi” or to ask a question.

What are some of your hobbies?

Hmmm let’s see, besides reading (is that a hobby?) I do enjoy dabbling in astronomy, chemistry, electronics, geology, biology, physics … mostly with kids. Actually, I’d say kids are my main hobby. Starting in high school (Sacramento Adventist Academy) I have been involved with church day camps, summer camps, Sabbath School primary and juniors, Pathfinders, etc. everywhere I have been. My other main “hobby” is spending time with Angwin Ambulance as a volunteer EMT and ambulance driver.

Who is one of your favorite authors?

Wow, if I have to start picking I will say Richard Feynman and Oliver Sacks. Oh, and Mary Roach is super quirky and educational; I love her audio books. Was I supposed to only pick one?

What’s something people may be surprised to learn about you?

I worked for 11 years in Lincoln, Nebraska, for Christian Record Services for the Blind and Deaf. During that time I learned enough sign language to converse and also helped our deaf services department create the Pathfinder honor for sign language.

#FacultyFriday: Meet Marie Pak

Dr. Marie Pak, professor in the department of chemistry, has been teaching at PUC for close to two decades, since 1999. She specializes in biochemistry and spent six years as a postdoctoral research fellow at the National Institutes of Health in Rockville, Maryland. She enjoys reading, going to state fairs, and watching movies. Let’s spend a few minutes getting to know Dr. Pak!

Name: Dr. Marie Pak
Title: Professor of Chemistry
Email: mpak@puc.edu
Faculty since:  1999

Classes taught: Introductory Chemistry, Survey of Organic Chemistry, Survey of Biochemistry, Biochemistry, Biochemistry Lab

Education: B.S. in Biochemistry from Indiana University, M.S. and Ph.D. in Developmental and Molecular Biology from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine

What made you decide to be a teacher?  

Teaching allowed me to share my passion for chemistry and to have time for my son.

What are some of your hobbies?  

I enjoy cooking, watching documentaries, reading, going to state fairs, and nurturing plants.

What’s something people might be surprised to know about you?  

I know some NASCAR trivia.

What’s your favorite thing about PUC?  

PUC’s serene environment and its trees.

What’s your favorite spot on campus?  

Chan Shun 328 laboratory with windows.

What’s your favorite movie? (pick one)

“Seven Samurai”

What advice would you give to an incoming freshman?  

Follow your heart when choosing your major.

Professional activities (Note: Only the most recent three in each category are listed.)

Publications

  1. Pak, J.R. Hoskins, S.K. Singh, M. Maurizi, and S. Wickner (1999).  Concurrent chaperone and protease activities of ClpAP and the requirement for the N-terminal ClpA ATP binding site for chaperone activity.  The Journal of Biological Chemistry, 274, 19316-19322.
  2. Anderson, L. Phan, R. Cuesta, B.A. Carlson, M. Pak, K. Asano, G.R. Bjork, M. Tamame, and A.G. Hinnebusch (1998).  The essential Gcd10p-Gcd14p nuclear complex is required for 1-methyladenosine modification and maturation of initiator methionyl-tRNA.  Genes Dev., 12, 3650-3662.

Presentations

  1. Pak and S. Wickner (1996).  Molecular chaperone function of ClpA in plasmid P1 RepA activation and degradation. Protein folding and assembly in the cell, FASEB summer research conference, July 27-Aug 1, Saxtons River, Vermont.
  2. Pak, H. Pelka, I. Willis, and L.H. Schulman (1993).  In vivostudy of E. colitRNATrpidentity.  15th international tRNA workshop, May 30-June 4, Cap d’Agde, France.

#FacultyFriday: Meet Jon Carstens

Long-time art and history lover Professor Jon Carstens has dedicated three decades of his life to PUC. His interest in various styles, eras, mediums, and artists brings a lot to the table for our students, and we’re glad to have him on our faculty. You can discuss all this and more if you catch up with Professor Carstens in Fisher Hall between classes—and trust us: bring a maple bar.

Name: Jon Carstens
Title: Associate Professor of Art History
Email: jcarstens@puc.edu
Faculty since: 1979-2004, then back in 2014

Fall Quarter Classes: History of Western Art I: Prehistoric to Medieval, History of Western Art II: Renaissance to Modern, History of American Art, History of Women Artists, History of Asian Art, History of Modern Art to 1945, History of Contemporary Art Since 1945, History of Photography and History of World Cinema

Education: B.A. in art history and history from the University of Redlands; M.A. in art history from the University of California, Riverside

What started your passion for history and art?

Ever since I was a young child I always had an interest in history and the biographies of noteworthy persons in particular. In the tenth grade, I took a college prep class called Humanities which incorporated history, literature, philosophy, and art history into an integrated three-hour block. I was immediately taken with the interdisciplinary nature of art history as it combined the best of all worlds for me; that is, the study of history seen through diverse cultural events of artists/architects/designers and their respective works. Art was more than just a pretty picture hanging on a wall; it was an expressive document which told me about the creator and their relationship to their supreme being(s), their fellow humans, themselves and to their environment.

So what made you want to teach?

In part, it is in my genes. I come from a family of teachers. My mother fostered a progressive educational environment both at home and at school; her approach stressed the joy of learning in all academic areas with special emphasis on the humanities. She never missed a chance to observe our fascination with something and provide us with the requisite learning materials to enhance that interest. I can still remember my excitement going to the mailbox to get the most recent issue of Life magazine when I got home from elementary school on a Friday afternoon. Little did I know Henry Luce’s prospectus for the magazine to be “Show Book to the World” would become my mantra as a teacher: “To see and take pleasure in seeing; to see and be amazed; to see and be instructed.” Ultimately, as Pablo Picasso once said, “The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away.” That is why I am a teacher.

What is your favorite period in art history?

Attempting to answer that is akin to responding to a question as to who is my favorite child or grandchild. As a generalist, I genuinely have a passion for nearly all art historical/cultural epochs. If pressed, I am all over the place, as I have a special affinity for the paintings of American Realists Winslow Homer and Edward Hopper, while at the same time I am enthralled with the woodblock prints of the Japanese Ukiyo-e masters Hokusai and Hiroshige. If I could turn back the clock, I could easily add to my specialty in late 19th Century American Realism by concentrating anew on the art and architecture of Japan and Islam.

Which artists inspire you?

One of the most inspirational artists for me is Maya Ying Lin. Her ability to respond to the divisiveness of the Vietnam War by creating a memorial in Washington, D.C. which miraculously heals and unifies at the same time was and continues to be a remarkable achievement. From a stylistic standpoint, her work in such a minimalist fashion touches humanity at an incredible number of universal levels. I never cease to be amazed at her ability to remain such a picture of dignity and grace when faced with intense criticism when she was awarded the commission as a college student.

Where did you grow up?

At the age of two, my family moved from my birthplace in Beatrice, Nebraska, to San Bernardino, California, where I grew up. There I attended Barton Elementary, Highland Junior High, and San Gorgonio High.

What are some of your hobbies?

I don’t know if these are considered hobbies, but I enjoy home renovation both in terms of interior and landscape design. The research which goes into choosing and coordinating colors, materials, furniture, plants, trees, and lighting is my mode of personal expression and I enjoy it very much.

Going local, what is your typical order at the Grind?

Since my wife makes me different blends of tea which I bring to work from home, I don’t go to the Grind; that could all change, however, if I find out they offer maple bars and cinnamon rolls.

Tell us something about yourself we might be surprised to learn.

For eight years I raced karts at road courses in Davis, Dixon, and Prairie City here in Northern California.

Where is your favorite place in the world, and why?

If we are talking somewhere in the U.S., my favorite place would be Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, with its four-seasons climate and spectacular scenic combination of lakes, forests, mountains, and rolling hills. In Europe, it would be the Tuscan region of Italy as I never cease to enjoy the thought of being transported back to the Renaissance while strolling the streets and attending the museums of Florence.

#FacultyFriday: Meet Jean Sheldon

Dr. L. Jean Sheldon has been with PUC for an impressive 23 years, a stalwart professor in the department of theology. Her area of doctoral study is the Old Testament and ancient Mesopotamia. Previously, she worked as an instructor of religion at Hong Kong Adventist College and as a graduation analyst for PUC. She is known for her writings, and gardening, music, and cat psychology.

For the last #FacultyFriday of the year, let’s spend some time getting to know Dr. Sheldon!

Name: Dr. Jean Sheldon
Title: Professor of Old Testament
Email: jsheldon@puc.edu
Faculty since: 1995

Classes taught: Honors: Engaging Scripture, Women & the Bible, Holistic Living, Christian Ethics in Society, Books of Moses, Babylon & the Bible, Intro to Christian Ethics, God & Human Suffering, Kings & Conquest, Psalms & Wisdom Literature, Biblical Ethics

Education: B.A. from Andrews University, 1982; M.A. from Loma Linda University, 1984; Ph.D. from Graduate Theological Union and University of California, Berkeley, 2002

What made you decide to be a teacher?

1) Impromptu leading my academy freshman class in discussion when the other members of my group refused to help with making the presentation. 2) God’s call and anointing to be a theologian. 3) God’s leading in that direction.

What are some of your hobbies?

Research, writing, gardening, singing, cats

What’s your favorite thing about PUC?

The natural setting—the back 40; and the freedom I have here to teach about God.

What’s your favorite spot on campus?

The prayer chapel

What’s your favorite song?

“Be Still My Soul”

What advice would you give to an incoming freshman?

Take time for God and nature.

Professional activities (Note: Only presentations and works published most recently are listed)

June 16, 2018 – “Wrong Time but Move Forward!” Baccalaureate address, Pacific Union College.

October 13, 2017 – “Divine Anger in Ancient Mesopotamia and the Hebrew Bible.” Presentation for the Character of God Conference. Garden Grove SDA Church, Garden Grove, California.

October 13, 2017 – “Babylon and the New Jerusalem.” Presentation for the Character of God
Conference. Garden Grove SDA Church, Garden Grove, California.

August 5, 2017 – “God’s Violent Acts.” Presentation for a regional chapter of the Association of Adventist Forums, Orlando, Florida.

August 5, 2017 – “The Conquest of Canaan.” Presentation for a regional chapter of the Association for Adventist Forums, Orlando Florida (Sermon at the University Church).

August 4, 2017 – “Two Kinds of Relationships: A Canonical Critical Study of Old Testament Covenants.” Presentation for a regional chapter of the Association for Adventist Forums, Orlando, Florida.

General Publications

Over 20 articles for such publications as Spectrum, Signs of the TimesAdventist Review, and Insight since 1973.

“No Longer Naked and Ashamed: Discovering That God Is Not an Abuser.” Parker, CO:
Outskirts Press, 2009

“Chasing Heaven to Avoid Hell,” Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1984
Reprinted in Heritage Series, 2012.

“Ribbon of Lies, Knife of Truth,” Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1982.
Reprinted in Heritage Series under new title: And God Cried Out, Why This Suffering?, 2017

“Sharing Jesus,” Mountain View, CA: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1980
Reprinted in Heritage Series, 2014

“Sabbath School Teacher’s Aids for Ephesians” (1st Quarter, 1986)

#FacultyFriday: Meet Sylvia Rasi Gregorutti

When you have a professor like Sylvia Rasi Gregorutti on your class schedule, you’re in for a treat. She’s an ideal person to be teaching classes on language and culture, seeing as how she speaks five languages and has explored three additional. She has also traveled to many countries and thoroughly understands the study abroad program, as she spent a year in Argentina in high school, and studied in France during her college years. She is now deeply involved with Adventist Colleges Abroad, even spending some time consulting with ACA Brazil this past summer.

Name: Sylvia Rasi Gregorutti
Title: Professor of world languages
Email: srasi@puc.edu
Faculty since: 1993

Current Classes Taught: ITAL 111-112-113: Beginning Italian I-II-III; SPAN 105: Spanish for Health Care Professionals; LANG 450: Advanced Language Study; SPAN 480: Spanish & Latin American Film; SPAN 470: Readings in Spanish & Latin American Literature; SPAN 490: Senior Seminar I.

Education: B.A. in French and English, emphasis in English as a second language (ESL), Andrews University; M.S. in applied linguistics and Ph.D. in sociolinguistics, both at Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.

When and how did you know you were going to be a professor?

My second-grade teacher at Ruth Murdoch Elementary School in Berrien Springs, Michigan, asked me to be an ESL tutor because I had finished my spelling book in record time. My first students were two classmates, a German boy and a Swedish boy. I felt useful and had a lot of fun! So that was my first experience. But it wasn’t really clear on this path until maybe my junior year of college. It was more the subject matter that attracted me—I wasn’t totally sure whether I’d be a researcher, educator, or something else.

How did you become interested in languages and culture?

I was born to immigrant parents who, when I was a child, were professors. Where I grew up, it was fairly common to speak another language and have another home culture. I always had fun learning about the home languages and cultures of my friends. My family wasn’t wealthy by any means, but travel was an important part of our general education.

Which languages do you speak?

I grew up with Spanish and English, in that order. I’ve since learned French, Italian, and Portuguese (in progress), and have made attempts at Russian, Japanese, and Chinese. The only “strictly classroom” languages have been Russian and Chinese. The others involved a degree of immersion in addition to instruction. That’s always the best combination: Some explanation coupled with extensive contact.

What are some of your favorite movies?

I have to include Arrival (2016). I’m not a huge SciFi fan, but the protagonist is a linguist, and the concepts that are presented are fascinating. Il Postino (The Postman, 1994) and The Mission (1986).

What are some of your hobbies?

Travel is at the top of the list—domestic and especially international. I love gardening; it’s good therapy and there are delicious and healthy byproducts. I also like food preserving—I make my own tomato sauce and jams, some from foraged fruit. This year was my second attempt at grape juice from our backyard grapes—moscato, malbec, and cabernet sauvignon.

If you could have lunch with a celebrity, who would it be and why?

I’m honestly not at all into celebrities. But I’d probably choose someone who’s a creative or a thinker, maybe an activist or philanthropist so we could have an interesting conversation.

Name a book or author you would recommend and why?

I’ve enjoyed books by neurologist Oliver Sacks (for example, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat). He has a great writing style and discusses a variety of topics about the human brain/mind. Also travel writer Pico Iyer (for example, Video Night in Kathmandu) and Christian writer and thinker C. S. Lewis—I’ve been re-reading some of his classics with my 13-year-old daughter.

What is something people might be surprised to learn about you?

I met my husband when I was 16 and he was 15 years old—he was a good friend, but I was actually hoping he’d like my younger cousin! We were friends for 11 years and across three continents before we got married.

What advice would you give someone who wants to learn more about different cultures, but is nervous and doesn’t know where/how to begin?

First of all, there’s no need to be nervous. Find a comfortable place to start—a culture or language that is attractive to you or an aspect of the traditions that fascinates you, a friend or personal ancestry. Most people are very receptive to respectful, curious inquiry. You can start with a language class, a set of movies, a traditional craft, sport, dish, or dance to learn, a local celebration—there are so many in the Bay Area—a trip that highlights a special festival or outstanding architecture. It’s important to be open, receptive, and non-judgmental. In finding out more about how things are done and thought about elsewhere else, you might be surprised and overjoyed to find a new way of being yourself!

Current Professional Activities:

Translation and editing of a new biography of Argentine-German missionary Pedro Kalbermatter (Twenty Years as a Missionary among the Natives of Peru), which was commissioned by his son, Alfredo.

Translation and editing of a biography of Argentine Francisco Hermógenes Ramos Mexía (1773-1828), a landowner known for his support of native rights and possibly the first Sabbath-keeper in the Americas.

#FacultyFriday: Meet Rachelle Davis

If you’ve never sat down with Dr. Rachelle Davis, you absolutely need to. All musicians have to have a good ear, but Dr. Davis is also really great at listening and she’s ridiculously smart and interesting. So tuck your feet under you and get comfy and get to know a little more about Dr. Davis. Then, stop by her office in Paulin Hall sometime and introduce yourself. You won’t regret it.

Name: Rachelle Davis
Title: Professor and Chair, Department of Music
Email: rdavis@puc.edu
Faculty since: 2005

Classes Taught: Basic Conducting, Orchestra, String Quartet, Survey of Music, Music History: Antiquity through Baroque, Music History: Classical and Romantic Periods, Music History: Twentieth Century and Beyond, Violin and Viola Lessons, Violin and Viola group class

Education: B.S. in music, Pacific Union College; M.M. in violin performance with violin pedagogy cognate, Jacob School of Music, Indiana University; D.M.A., Butler School of Music, University of Texas

What made you want to become a musician?

I don’t know. I couldn’t not be musician. I was always a violin performance major in college, but my dad wanted me to get a ‘real’ job—ie: something that paid the bills. I took pre-Physical Therapy coursework (including G-Chem) until I actually did observations my junior year and decided PT was not for me. One summer I went on a five-week international music tour with PUC, followed by six weeks at Meadowmount School of Music practicing five and six hours a day and rehearsing for several more. By the end of the summer I was sure I didn’t want to be a professional musician and set my sights on becoming a nurse practitioner. In February of my senior year, I realized I loved teaching (I had a couple of pre-college students) and if I got my masters degree in nursing I’d be teaching patient care instead of music. At that point there were plenty of long conversations with friends and lots of tears because I didn’t want to say ‘yes’ to music and the dreaded/beloved practicing. Sometimes what you love hurts too much. Music won. Sometimes I think I was saying yes to a calling. I don’t always like my calling.

What was it that made you love the professor role so much?

It was the ‘Aha’ moments I experienced teaching violin students as a teenager and college student. I was good at it. Also, I loved college, learning, and the way the college environment challenged and expanded how I saw the world. My brain had never been stretched as much as it was in World History or Philosophy of Religion or Great Books, classes I had to take as part of the GE package but which opened whole new worlds to me. I remember sitting at the overlook on Brookside with a date as a senior at PUC and realizing teaching college was a career option I was interested in, but then dismissing the idea as unrealistic. (Pay attention to what you wish for … )

Let’s combine the two: What do you love most about teaching music?

Most of us who teach on this campus will probably have the same answer: The ‘Aha’ moment, when someone finally understands a subject or masters a technique or, in teaching violin or rehearsing the orchestra, when the black dots on the page turn from mere notes into music that can reach inside someone and allow us to connect with each other. It is addicting in the best sense of the word.

What is your favorite musical period and/or genre, and why?

In classical music, 20th century and beyond. You can do anything and there is more edginess to the music. It is predictably unpredictable and there are so many different style options—always with a twist though. There is something for everyone. In non-classical, I like listening to jazz and blues. I love the improvisatory nature of those genres and the way notes are bent and chords are amazingly complex. Classic rock works as well.

Where did you grow up?

My family moved from Loma Linda to Bella Vista Hospital in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico when I was three. I grew up climbing mango trees, running around barefoot, and snorkeling. (If I hadn’t been homeschooled, I might be fluent in Spanish, but alas, I’m only proficient.) When I was thirteen, we moved to Fall River Mills, a small town in the middle-of-nowhere Northeastern California. Spectacular views of Mt. Shasta and Mt. Lassen made it a beautiful place to live, but the nearest stoplight was an hour away and music lessons were 2.5 hours away.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

An underwater archaeologist, then an astronaut. (Prompted, I’m sure, by repeated watching of Nova, National Geographic, and PBS videos of space exploration—the first space shuttle went up about the time we got a VCR. It was either that, or watch lions kill zebras on animal specials—no movies for us.) What I really enjoyed doing though was decorating and redecorating the almost-Barbie-sized doll house I inherited from someone. It’s amazing what you can do with blocks, bits of fabric, discarded/recycled odds and ends from around the house, and pieces of wallpaper from a salvaged wallpaper sample book. In an alternate reality I would be an interior designer or an architect. (I definitely didn’t want to teach violin to someone like me, who hated to practice—obviously I’ve changed my mind.)

What are some of your hobbies?

Reading. It is a form of therapy and a way to experience life through someone else’s eyes. I LOVE libraries. I can come home with a pile of books on whatever I’m curious about (the last subjects I brought home piles of books on were architecture and low-water landscaping—and, of course, fiction). I also really enjoy any kind of remodel or design project. My son thinks I’m obsessed. Maybe I am. Snow skiing makes me happy—so does hiking in scenic locations and hanging out in/on/by the water. I enjoy community and deep conversation. That too is a form of therapy. (So is coffee.)

Who are some composers and/or performers who inspire you?

Andrew Bird, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Anne-Sophie Mutter, Rene Fleming, Caroline Shaw, Snarky Puppy, YoYo Ma … the list goes on. Dmitri Shostakovich, Johannes Brahms and Gustav Mahler all lived depressed lives but wrote amazing symphonies that have a way of pulling me up when things seem upside down.

If you could have lunch with one celebrity, who would it be, and why?

This one is a tough one. People are interesting and everyone has a story to tell. When I was a kid, I would have said Princess Diana. I was obsessed. Can I pick more than one? I think Brene Brown is interesting for her work on shame and vulnerability, or Lady Gaga, for her persistence and ability to transform her vocal style from complete show pop to American songbook-style singing. Neil Gaiman would also be amazing. His capacity for inventive storytelling is awe-inspiring.

Name one thing you’re proud of thus far in life.

One thing I’m proud of from my master’s work is the three pedagogy papers I wrote for violin pedagogy classes I took with Mimi Zweig at Indiana University became the impetus/starting point for the written material on her award winning StringPedagogy.com website. Since my focus has shifted to college work, I haven’t written more on the subject.

Professional Activities: Faculty recital with Joel Dickerson, March 2016; Faculty recital with guest harpist Beverly Wesner-Hoehn, October 2016; clinician for the NCC Academy Festival Orchestra, March 2017; Benefit concert for UpValley Family Centers, May 2018.

#FacultyFriday: Meet Julianna Boydston

Napa Valley native Julianna Boydston joins the nursing faculty this year. She has a great mix of both indoor and outdoor hobbies, and she loves what she does. Check out her profile below to learn more about the department of nursing’s newest addition.

Name: Julianna Boydston
Title: Assistant Professor of Nursing
Email: jboydston@puc.edu
Faculty since: 2018

Fall Quarter Classes: Management & Professional Practice and faculty-on-record for 6th-quarter students’ corresponding preceptorship NURS 325L

Education: BSN and MSN from the University of San Francisco

What drew you into nursing?

I had been looking for a career to keep me closer to home. After welcoming our first child into our lives, I decided the time was now to begin a career in academia. I have always loved education and teaching in the hospital setting; I am now excited to have the opportunity to educate our newest generation of nurses. Nursing is not only a profession, but a calling for most, and I am pleased I will be able to work with students who share that calling.

And what brought you here?

The nursing program at PUC is very highly regarded in the community and I am happy to be a part of such a great program.

Where were you working prior to coming to PUC?

I was a registered nurse at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, San Francisco. I worked as a bedside nurse in the pediatric cardiac ICU where we take care of critically ill infants, children, and adults with congenital heart defects. We recently added a cardiac transplant program to the Pediatric Heart Center, as well.

So you’re practically a local, but has anything surprised you since arriving at PUC?

I grew up in Napa Valley, so I am used to the beautiful scenery and surrounding areas. I love the tall and majestic redwood trees surrounding the campus and on my drive into work each morning. There is something so special about these beautiful trees. After learning this group of redwoods are the most inland gathering of these trees, I find them to be even more special.

What do you enjoy doing in your free time?

My favorite hobby is riding horses. I love to ride out in the hills, alone or with friends and family. I also enjoy cooking for friends and family, and baking cookies, pies, and lemon bars.

Everyone has a surprising element to them—what’s yours?

I am secretly very shy by nature.