Q&A with Winter Revival Speaker Aren Rennacker

By Becky St. Clair

Aren Rennacker is currently the youth and college pastor at the Calimesa Seventh-day Adventist Church. After graduating in 2007 from Sacramento Adventist Academy, Aren went on to earn his bachelor’s degree in PR and journalism from PUC in 2011, then his master’s in theological studies from La Sierra University in 2017.

One of four kids, Aren has myriad stories from his childhood, during which he dreamed of winning a spot on an NBA team.

He will be speaking during PUC’s Winter Revival, Jan. 22-25, and his theme is “Authentic.” We caught up with Aren so we could all get to know him a little better (how did he go from basketball star to youth pastor?) as we prepare to receive his insights on authenticity and God next week.

Why did you choose “Authentic” as your theme?

It’s such a unique time to be alive right now, and particularly to be in college. Students are forming their identities in the midst of a lot of distrust, competition, pressure, and confusion. These can all contribute to misunderstandings about oneself and what it means to be human. My hope is for one week, we can practically examine the journey of growing as a child of God, and how that actually is meant to allow for more authenticity in our lives, not less. I truly hope our time together is engaging, practical, and genuine to the students’ experiences.

What was your experience with church and worship as a college student, and how has that affected your life today?

Friday night vespers at PUC were always a highlight. I spent most Sabbaths with Kidz Reach, a group that mentored at-risk youth in Napa. Also, the religion classes were outstanding. Truly, the entire spiritual environment at PUC helped me grow in a lot of ways and led me into pursuing ministry. I remain grateful to this day for the teachers and leaders I had as guides during those years.

What’s something that challenged you as a young adult, and how did you handle it?

At the end of my freshman year, I was asked to take a year off to serve as the youth leader at a local church. At that time I still wanted to be a sports journalist and had no desire to be a pastor; however, I felt saying “no” would upset God.

I met with a mentor of mine to process the decision, and he helped me see God was not for me or against me based on my decision, but both “yes” and “no” could be the right or wrong answer based upon how I chose to spend the next year. That took a lot of the pressure off and helped me see God in a healthier way.

I decided to return to PUC that year recommitted to serving God on campus. And, what do you know, by the end of that year I decided I wanted to pursue a career as a youth pastor instead of as a journalist.

What were you like as a kid?

I was the youngest of four and I’m sure I acted like it. Fortunately, my mom and siblings were patient and helped create a great childhood for me. Sports were my passion, and I always wanted to be watching, playing, or reading about them. Reading the sports page in the newspaper every day helped cultivate my love for writing, and obsessing over the Sacramento Kings helped me acclimate to taking losses. Despite that, I was a generally happy kid who enjoyed school and loved my family.

What is your favorite food to eat?

My favorite food category is ice cream. (Is that a category?) Seriously, though, if I were to have one plate of anything, it would be my mom’s French toast. She’s the only one in the world who can make it her way.

What do you enjoy doing in your free time?

I still enjoy playing basketball, and I’m hoping to play some while I’m up at PUC. I’m currently in the middle of several good books, including Under the Overpass, an account of two guys who chose to become homeless for five months to better understand what others experience. But my favorite free time activity is spending time with my girlfriend, Paige, which usually means a game of Uno, an episode of The Office, or a bowl of acai. Better yet: all three.

What are some items on your bucket list?

This is a timely question because I turn 30 this summer, meaning I should probably do some life reflecting. Some of the things I’ve done are travel the U.S., work at a job I love, and see the Giants win the World Series (three times). I’d still love to run a half marathon, write a book, and star on Broadway. Dream big.

What would you say is your main goal for Winter Revival?

My ultimate goal for the week would be for those listening to be willing to process or wrestle with at least one new idea or perspective they hear. Living within a faith community can often numb us to yet another message (myself included), so if any student or staff actually feel something they hear is worth consuming and thinking over, perhaps even discussing with a friend, I’d be honored and grateful. I simply long to be a small part in the journey of growth for anybody who will allow me to be.

If, in the course of said discussions or ponderings, a student has questions or just wants to connect with you about things, how can they reach you?

I would love to talk in person while I’m on the hill, or they can reach me at asrennacker@gmail.com.

Five Reasons to Come to PUC’s College Days

If you’ve never heard of College Days, it’s PUC’s special visitation event, held three times a year, and is two and a half action-packed days where you can experience what life at the college is like. It’s a great way to see if PUC is the right fit for you.

The next College Days event is scheduled for February 10-12, 2019, and we would love to have you here for it! Come experience everything PUC has to offer as you decide where to attend college. Sign up now!

Here are just five reasons why you should consider coming to College Days next month!

You will get to know more about PUC’s prime location

One of the best things about PUC is our location. Not only is it a beautiful place to live with many opportunities to get out in nature, but the campus is also blessed with a close proximity to incredible places like Napa, San Francisco, Mendocino, Tahoe, and lots more. You can visit a museum in the city or spend time on the coast. Your options are limitless.

During College Days you’ll get to experience both Napa and San Francisco in person! So be sure to have your camera handy to capture some really Instagram-worthy sights. We’ll take you downtown Napa for an afternoon and you’ll also get to spend time at Pier 39 in San Francisco.

You will gather insight into academic programs

During College Days students will discover more about college academics. Between dinner with faculty, sitting in on real college classes, and experiences showcasing many of PUC’s departments, hopefully, you’ll walk away with a better understanding of what program you want to join!

You get to attend a special financial aid workshop

Monday morning offers College Days participants a financial aid workshop allowing you to learn all about how to pay for college. From PUC specific scholarships to information on FAFSA, you’ll be able to speak with a knowledgeable financial aid counselor to learn how an Adventist education is possible at PUC.

You can hear about PUC directly from PUC students

While you’re visiting PUC for College Days, you’ll constantly be interacting with current students, which is the perfect way to really understand the heart and soul of the Pioneers community. You will stay in their rooms, join them for meals in the cafe, sit in on their classes, worship with them, and attend a panel where you can ask them any question you might have.

You will immerse yourself into college life

Come be a Pioneer, if only for a few days! One of the best things about visiting PUC for College Days is being on campus for several days and really getting to experience what it’s like to be a student here. As you walk around campus, try picturing yourself as a PUC student. Envision how great it will be to make this place your home for your college years. Make the most of your visit by asking questions and taking advantage of every opportunity to talk with current students and professors to see if PUC is the right fit for you.

We hope you will join us for our February College Days. Don’t forget to sign up! You can also email visit@puc.edu or call (800) 862-7080, option 2 to learn more and for information about our travel reimbursement policy.

Halcyon: An Interview with Diana Majdumar

As a child, Diana Majdumar loved watching her father draw. She learned the basics of watercolors from him, and accompanied him to art museums in Estonia (where she grew up), Russia, and Armenia, and was honored to receive as a gift his large set of art books printed in Russian.

After immigrating to the United States, Diana graduated with a Master of Fine Arts degree in drawing and painting from Academy University in San Francisco. There she learned to appreciate and explore different subject matter from traditional landscape paintings and still-life to portraiture. She has studied clay sculpture, charcoal figure drawing, acrylics in mixed media, and, her personal favorite, oil and watercolor painting.

An opening reception for Diana’s show, “Halcyon—Encaustic,” will take place Saturday, Jan. 12, from 7-9 p.m. in PUC’s Rasmussen Art Gallery. The collection of Diana’s encaustic paintings will be on display through Feb. 10, and will be available for viewing every Thursday-Sunday from 2-6:30 p.m. Both the opening reception and admission to the gallery are free and open to the public.

Diana was gracious enough to offer us a glimpse of her world as we prepare to enjoy her work throughout the coming month.

What are encaustic paintings?

Encaustic is basically a beeswax with some damar resin mixed in as a binding element to provide elasticity to the wax, making it less brittle and more long-lasting. In order to apply encaustic, it has to be melted. I use a special electric plate that lets me keep wax melted and hot at a consistent temperature without it getting too hot and smoky or not hot enough. While it is melted it can be applied with brushes one brushstroke at a time like you would with regular paint, except wax starts to harden the second it leaves the hot plate so I have to work fast. After wax is applied it has to be melted on the panel once again; this step is called fusing. This allows for multiple layers of wax to be applied. As long as each layer is fused layer upon layer can be built up.

What is the space like where you work?

My studio is in rural West Petaluma, where we moved six years ago. We fell in love with mature California Coastal oaks and how remote and rustic it feels here, even though we are only few minutes from town. My studio is attached to the back of the garage, away from the house and facing the backyard. I have a few windows and one is very large. My view is of the oaks, a meadow, and a wood stack, but my favorite thing to see out of the window is all the bird activity. In one day, I can easily see up to 20 different kinds of birds: titmice, bushtits, and sparrows in the morning; towhees, crows, and scrub jays later in the day. I usually have my camera handy.

My space is pretty well organized—usually, I know where to find what I need! Though depending on what I’m working on, it can get pretty messy. Especially if I’m just in the collage stages of the process. Lots of boxes and baskets get pulled down from the shelves while I look for the right piece of wallpaper, scrap of fabric, or page from a book.

I’m fortunate to have a studio; not having one for a long time and having to use a corner in the garage instead, I know firsthand what a huge difference it makes to have a special space. And to me it’s not just space for creating art; it’s a refuge—a place I go to first when I get home, a place I go to get away.

What inspired you to become an artist?

It was actually my dad’s dream to become an artist, not mine. In fact, he planned on applying to art school upon graduating high school in Armenia where he grew up, but his parents insisted he pursue a more ‘useful’ profession, and he became an auto mechanic instead. He did some drawing and watercolors, but casually. Years later both my sister and I sat an entrance exam to an art school in Estonia which was the only way to study art with proper instruction. Both of us failed. Only my dad was devastated. From my perspective, getting into that school would mean spending hours with strict, unfriendly teachers (we met few during the exam) after school, coming home in the dark, having to take a couple different trams to get there, and learning art from the basics up, while all I wanted to do is doodle princesses and fairies. My dad’s dreams must have stayed with me, because when I moved to the United States and career choices were in front of me, somehow art was among the options, and I took it.

Every artist has a muse or muses; what inspires your work?

Nature! I know how cliché that sounds, but it’s true! I don’t mean the grandeur of Yosemite Valley or the awesome vistas of the coast. The most mundane and small objects of nature catch my eye and stay with me, like the Queen Anne’s Lace that grows freely on the side of the roads all over Sonoma and Marin. If you slow enough while driving, you will see the white blossoms glowing in the sun in the spring. Now they are brown and have the most interesting shapes.

My painting, “Oak Branch,” (above) was inspired by the impossibly bright leaves on the branch of a fallen oak tree in the Petaluma countryside. It seemed so strange something dead could be so bright, but the saturated yellows and oranges seemed to glow when the sunlight hit them a certain way. I dragged the branch to the side of the road where I was able to take photos of it. The graceful arc of the branch and the colors of the leaves, though dead, is what I tried to capture in the painting.

Who is an artist whose work you enjoy?

My favorite artist is Andrew Wyeth. There are a couple quotes of his that really speak to me; one is, “It’s a moment that I’m after; a fleeting moment, but not a frozen moment.” That captures exactly what I’m trying to achieve in my work. When I paint birds I try and seize a moment in time. How a perfect pair of finches is poised on the branch of the apple tree right outside my window—but just for a second. Of course, I paint from photos—the birds never sit still—but I hope that I can express how lively they are in reality.

In another quote, Wyeth says, “I prefer winter and fall, when you feel the bone structure of the landscape.” Fall and winter and are my favorite seasons as well. I love the sculptural quality of it where you can see shapes more clearly, and the colors are more earthy and intense. Most of my paintings use elements of winter and fall: bare branches of trees in winter, red berries with all the leaves gone, brown leaves of late fall. The color palette of Wyeth’s paintings really resonates with me. At first sight, it might seem limited with its few muddy browns, but if you look longer you see his brushwork—the delicate lines. I especially love his winter landscapes.

What is the meaning of the title of your show, “Halcyon,” and how did you come to choose it?

“Halcyon” has two meanings. First, it denotes a period of time in the past that was idyllically happy and peaceful, and second, it’s a tropical Asian and African kingfisher.

I love unusual words. English is my second language, and I always feel somewhat lacking in my vocabulary. A few years ago when my son had to study for his SAT, I was more than happy to help him with the 200 words that might show up on the test. I still get excited when I hear words like “boon” and “assuage” on the radio.

I especially love words that have anything to do with nature and often use them for the titles of my paintings. I have most of the books by Robert Macfarlane, who travels the countryside of Great Britain and collects the words and sayings that might be disappearing. Several years ago Oxford Junior Dictionary got rid of many nature words such as willow, pasture, and acorn, replacing them with tech-related words. I find that incredibly sad. I say we need more words like “smeuse” which is a gap in the hedge made by regular passage of wild animals, and “zwer:” the noise of the wings of a flock of birds taking flight.

Student Clubs at PUC

Members of the Biology Club at the Welcome Back party this past September.

By Sarah Tanner

From academic to civic to cultural clubs, PUC promises a space for all interested students. With over 15 organizations on campus, and a growing number each year, any student looking for a place to connect with those who share their passions is sure to find a group that is right for them. A conversation with a number of club presidents and members highlighted a handful of the clubs at PUC.

Vietnamese Student Association

Andrew Dang, president of the Vietnamese Student Association, explains his club creates a welcoming environment for Vietnamese students who want to strengthen ties to their cultural background.

“Our main goal is to preserve Vietnamese culture,” he said. “We want to celebrate our Vietnamese heritage, traditions, and values, with each other as well as with everyone interested in learning.”

Dang notes the club is open to students looking to learn more about the Vietnamese culture and welcomes all interested. He adds, “We aim to host events where students can come together as a family and take a break from the worries of school and enrich themselves in everything our culture has to offer.”

Get involved: Email Andrew at addang@puc.edu.

SPARK

SPARK stands for Science Presentations and Research for Kids. This club focuses on making science fun and accessible for students of all ages.

Member Emma Tyner notes, “We aim to excite students about the sciences, especially biology and chemistry. As a club, much of what we do centers on going out into the community, visiting schools, and bringing science to life for students from elementary to high school.”

One of the ways they achieve this is by bringing live animals in to supplement their biology presentations. They also carry out step-by-step chemistry experiments in order to give younger students a hands-on experience with science.

Get involved: Email Emma at eetyner@puc.edu.

Thaumatrope

The mission statement of Thaumatrope, PUC’s community service club, cites their goal is, “transforming the young adults of today into catalysts of change for tomorrow through global awareness, service toward others, and realization of God’s purpose and passion for their lives.”

According to member Victoria Gabardi, Thaumatrope also strives to “spin our communities into one through mentorship, local work, and global service.”

Thaumatrope strives to help willing students become involved on campus, in local areas, and, ultimately, in the global community through volunteering.

Gabardi explains, “We help advertise events like volunteer health clinics, and organize others such as pre-vespers, Service Sabbath, and service visits to local retirement homes and schools, among others.”

Always looking for a new opportunity to serve, Thaumatrope is also planning a coat drive this winter, and are working to organize useful aid for the people of Paradise whose homes were lost in the fire.

Get involved: Email Victoria at vjgabardi@puc.edu.

Biology Club

The Biology Club was created with science majors—particularly those interested in the biological sciences—and the outdoors in mind.

Club president Tony Robles explains, “PUC is such a beautiful location to study nature, as we have our own forest within walking distance. The Biology Club wants to not only get its majors together for events but also hopes to make everyone aware of the many great ways available to explore the outdoors.”

The club organizes an annual trip to Albion, day trips to the coast, hikes in the Back 40, and pre-vespers. New this year is a trip to the Academy of Science Museum in San Francisco.

Get involved: Email member Lily at litran@puc.edu.

Climbing Club

The Climbing Club is a relatively new addition to PUC’s campus organizations.

“The reason we created this club is to encourage a climbing community at PUC,” explains Reuben Dick, club president. “As my own climbing skills and experience has grown, my friends and I felt as though our campus lacked a climbing community, despite the fact that PUC has access to great climbing areas. As a result, we took it upon ourselves to create this club to foster both veteran and beginner climbers.”
The club also worked to establish the climbing wall at the college.

“Because of our efforts and the hard work of many people here on campus in the past few quarters, we are happy to announce the wall opened on Sunday, Dec. 2,” Dick says.

Guided climbing trips to teach beginning climbers, activity nights at the new wall, pre-vespers, and movie nights are just a few of the activities this group has planned for the year. Dick notes no climbing experience or equipment is necessary, and all are welcome.

Get involved: Email Reuben at rjdick@puc.edu.

Mountain Biking Club

Like its sister, the Climbing Club, the Mountain Biking Club is a new club and another opportunity for activity at PUC.

“The goal of the Mountain Biking Club is to help people get outside and enjoy nature while participating in an exciting sport,” member Alex Nelson explains. “At PUC, we have over 40 miles of very high-quality bike trails both on PUC property, as well as in Las Posadas and the Palisades.”

The Mountain Biking Club creates opportunities for beginners with little-to-no mountain biking experience to be introduced to the sport under the guidance of more experienced cyclists. Likewise, no gear or prior knowledge is required before joining.

Nelson continues, “So far we have held two group rides, and it was a great time! We had roughly ten riders of varying skill levels, and we explored the trails of the back 40.”

More exciting Mountain Biking Club events will be announced throughout the year.

Get involved: Email Alex at acnelson@puc.edu.

SOL Club

One of PUC’s many cultural groups, SOL Club stands for Student Organization for Latinos. SOL’s influence is wide-ranging, as they contribute to worship services, student events, and many other areas of campus life.

President Amy Ramos explains, “Our mission is simple: to provide opportunities for students to celebrate and showcase our rich culture.” She continues, “Some SOL Club activities include pre-vespers, La Capilla, potlucks, an Albion retreat, and the SOL Club banquet, among many others. Additionally, we enjoy partnering with local churches and non-profit organizations to better reach out to the community.”

SOL Club strives to create a positive impact not only in its member’s lives, but also on the PUC community as a whole, and the organization welcomes all students who want to make a difference on campus.

Get involved: Email Amy at alramos@puc.edu.

PUC offers a wide and ever-expanding variety of clubs that provide unique opportunities for students to involve themselves in campus life. Membership fees depend on each group individually, and some clubs do not require any payment. However, for those clubs that include membership dues, free t-shirts are given to all members. Anyone interested in joining one of PUC’s clubs is welcome to speak with any of the members or presidents listed above, as all groups are happy to accept new members throughout the year.

The Twelve: PUC’s Student-Run Church Service

By Sarah Tanner

For over a year, PUC students have spearheaded a personalized, student-focused Sabbath worship service called The Twelve. Their mission is simple. Summarized by lead coordinator and junior English major, Leah Dopp, “Our goal is to develop an open spirit driven community that reflects the life and teaching of Jesus through discipleship.”

And, after five quarters of student-led worship services, it is clear their mission is a huge success.

Dopp, along with two of The Twelve’s veterans, heads a team of student leaders that meet weekly to create Saturday services for PUC’s student population. In a conversation with Leah over pad thai, she explained what makes The Twelve so special.

To tackle a project of this size, Dopp found it useful to delegate tasks, breaking down The Twelve into nine departments. Her team of student leaders includes coordinators for the various aspects of the service. Welcome and greetings are headed by Valerie Barraza and Hazel Labaco, respectively. Music is organized by Lydia Zebedeus. Nephta Marin heads PowerPoint slides during the service, and sound is coordinated by Nick Borchik. PR and treasury are organized by Stefaan Dick. Emily Castellanos is in charge of prayer, while Jayla Cruse directs stage management. And last, but definitely not least is the ever popular coffee ministry run by Audrey Uyemura, Kelly Kimura, and Jamie Nelson.

“Table meetings are held twice during the quarter to discuss big picture things, like speakers and any changes we want to make to the program,” Leah says. “We organize a list of students, faculty, alumni, and others who we feel would convey interesting messages during the service. Then, each student leader organizes contacts for their corresponding department and teams are formed. For example, music teams choose their songs based on the speaker’s topics so we can create continuity for the whole service.”

A typical Twelve service is fairly simple. Held at noon in Winning Hall’s Dauphinee Chapel every Saturday during the school year, visitors are greeted with coffee at the door and are then welcome to make their way to a seat. The service opens with a song followed by a brief welcome message. The worship team then performs two more songs which lead into a prayer or prayer activity that relates to the sermon. Following the message, welcome coordinators give announcements and the service is concluded.

“Our schedule is always open to changes; we want to keep things moving so we don’t get too sedentary,” says Dopp. “Right now we are playing with the idea of including a discussion time so people can reflect on the message of the service together.”

The Twelve’s name is meant to evoke a spirit of discipleship, as it calls forth the image of Jesus’ original followers. And this spirit of mentorship is present in virtually all facets of the service.

“In addition to the idea of student leaders acting as disciples through their running of the program, we also want to make sure that it is a lasting part of PUC’s legacy,” Dopp explained. “All leaders are constantly mentoring people to fill their position so that there is always someone able to step in and fill that role if needed.” She continues, “We are trying to get lots of people involved to carry on that spirit of mentorship. It doesn’t matter if they don’t have any experience; we’re here to teach.”

As The Twelve is student-run, it is also dependent on student feedback for the program’s growth and development. On this topic, Dopp made it clear, “We are always open to feedback. The Twelve is here to give the students what they want in a worship service, and to do that we need input; we strive to be an event that PUC wants to attend.”

Students looking to share ideas are encouraged to speak to any of the leaders mentioned above and can reach out via email to Leah directly at lmdopp@puc.edu or thetwelvepuc@gmail.com. The Twelve’s team is constantly looking for new speakers, contributors, and students to be involved in all aspects of the service.

“We’re really excited to see where this program will go. Our team’s dedication to creating a meaningful service is incredible.”

Dopp is right; The Twelve is something to be proud of, and it stands as a testament to the ability of students to make a meaningful impact on campus life.

Visit PUC This Winter!

Choosing what college to attend is a very important decision and one you shouldn’t make without doing a lot of research. What better way to research the colleges you’re considering than by visiting them? We would be thrilled to have you and your family come visit PUC! Take a campus tour given by one of our student ambassadors, sit in on a class, chat with a professor, eat in our cafeteria, walk around the charming nearby towns of St. Helena or Calistoga, AND if you plan in advance, join us for any of the following upcoming and exciting events.

Pioneers Athletics Games

PUC has six varsity sports teams: cross country, basketball, and volleyball for women; and cross country, basketball, and soccer for men. Throughout the year, we invite you to our gymnasium, nicknamed the “Covered Wagon,” or our soccer field to join the Pioneers Posse and cheer on our teams. Here’s a short list of a few upcoming games; for the full schedule, visit pioneersathletics.com.

  • December 15, 2018 – Pioneers Athletics vs. UC Merced, women’s at 6:30 p.m. & men’s at 8:30 p.m.
  • January 12, 2019 – Pioneers Athletics vs. CSU Maritime, women’s at 6:30 p.m. & men’s at 8:30 p.m.
  • January 17, 2019 – Pioneers Athletics vs. Embry-Riddle (AZ), women’s at 5:30 p.m. & men’s at 7:30 p.m.

Rasmussen Art Gallery Openings

If you’re interested in seeing some incredible works of art, you won’t want to miss the Rasmussen Art Gallery. Several times a quarter, a new exhibit opens at the college’s on-campus art gallery, which often features students, faculty, and other local artists. The opening reception is a chance to meet the artists, mingle with other guests, and enjoy some tasty snacks while appreciating the talent on display. If you can’t make it to one of the opening receptions, check with your tour guide to be sure to stop by and spend some time browsing during regular open hours.

  • January 12, 2019 – Opening Reception: Diana Majumdar, Halcyon, Encaustic, 7 p.m.
  • February 16, 2019 Opening Reception: Visual Arts Faculty Exhibition, 7 p.m.

For more information, visit the Rasmussen Art Gallery Facebook page.

Paulin Hall Music Concerts

PUC’s department of music has many concerts throughout the year; all of which are free to the public. The college has several ensembles that frequently perform, and there are usually multiple student recitals each quarter. For the Christmas holiday, there are several concerts we hope you can join us for!

  • December 6, 2018 – PUC String Ensemble Concert, 7 p.m.
  • December 7, 2018 – PUC Music Department Christmas Concert, 8 p.m.
  • December 8, 2018 – PUC Music Department Christmas Concert, 4 p.m.

Contact the department of music for more information; call (707) 965-6201 or email music@puc.edu.

Special Guest Lectures / Colloquies

Each year PUC is honored to host a myriad of interesting and knowledgeable guest lecturers. From our annual Civil Rights Lecture, our bi-annual Heubach lecture, and our bi-weekly colloquy speakers, there’s always something interesting in the lineup.

  • January 17, 2019 – Colloquy: Martin Luther King Jr. Remembrance, 10 a.m.
  • February 21, 2019 – Colloquy: Dr. Scott Nelson, 10 a.m.
  • February 28, 2019 – Heubach Lectureship Series: Dr. Jon Paulien, 7 p.m.
  • March 7, 2019 – Colloquy: Career Day, 10 a.m. (followed by the annual Career Fair)
  • March 9, 2019 – Annual Lecture of the Percy & John Christian Civil Rights Conference Center, 4 p.m.

For more information about these events, check out the college’s calendar at puc.edu/calendar.

Join Us For February College Days!

Several times a year, we host special visitation events called College Days. College Days is a jam-packed event where you will experience PUC with other visiting students. In addition to campus visit standards like touring the campus, talking with a professor in your major of interest, and eating in our Dining Commons, it’s a great opportunity to get a glimpse into what it’s really like to be a student at PUC as you stay in one of the residence halls and attend social and academic events.

We hope you can make plans to join us for College Days on February 10-12, 2019. Register now!

For more information about College days and other ways to visit, check out puc.edu/visitors.

We can spend hours explaining what we think makes life at PUC so unique but there’s no better way than by experiencing it firsthand, so schedule your visit today! Before you arrive, be sure to apply and send in your admissions documents for a quick acceptance! It will make your visit even more special as you officially become a member of the Pioneers family.

#PUCCollegeDays18

Earlier this month, we welcomed over 300 students and sponsors to our campus for College Days. If you’ve never heard of College Days, it is PUC’s special visitation event, held three times a year. The next event is scheduled for February 10-12, 2019. Sign up now!

College Days is two action-packed days where you can experience what life at the college is like, and a great way to see if PUC is the right fit for you.

Below are some of our favorite moments from this past College Days. You can also check out the hashtag #PUCCollegeDays18 to see more photos from the event!

Visiting students sign up for academic departments to visit.

PUC’s annual Fall Fest also took place during College Days, where student-run clubs raised money for projects by selling various items.

During one of the College Days meetings, visiting students got to hear from current PUC students about what life is like and ask questions about their experiences at the college.

There was also a faculty panel, during which faculty shared about their departments and why they love teaching at PUC.

A PUC student-led praise band closes the evening with worship.

Roasting marshmallows.

Starting the day with a worship thought.

The highlight of day two was a pizza party and visiting students speed mingling with different departments on campus.

We hope you will join us for our February College Days. Don’t forget to sign up!