Category Archives: Campus Events

Imparting Bits of Wisdom

Last week I was scrolling through Twitter and came across an interesting post thread. A woman, a wife and mother, decided to go back to school and get her college degree and was asking for advice for an incoming college freshman. After spending nearly ten minutes reading through the replies, some great, (actually attend your classes) and some a little less great, (don’t date the first attractive person you meet), I realized the faculty and staff at PUC have dedicated their careers to helping students reach their full potential and would likely love to impart some wisdom on this year’s incoming class! 

So here it is! Have some free advice from college professionals! 

“1) Talk to a teacher or staff member. Even if it is just a few words before or after class. Make contact more than once. We think you are interesting and want to get to know you! That is why we choose to work at PUC. 2) Get involved in something outside your department. Join a club, participate in a music ensemble, show up at SA events, make time to cheer for the Pioneers at home games, volunteer to help out with dorm worship, homeless ministries, vespers, The Twelve, Sabbath school, etc.” – Rachelle Davis, professor of music

“If you are interested in someday being a leader, find opportunities to serve today. Come see me and I can help!” – Kent Rufo, chaplain 

“My advice is to ask students! Other students are more than happy to help you out, so just ask! Who knows, you might even make some new friends.” – Jenn Tyner, vice president for student life

“I wish I had taken the time to learn about how the brain stores complex information. If Google had existed, I’d have researched “sleep and learning” and then proceeded to get way more guilt-free sleep than I did. You may also be surprised to find that time spent zoning out in PUC’s Back 40 (without a phone!) also helps your brain to solidify information that you have been studying.” – Maria Rankin-Brown, associate academic dean 

“Don’t let finances be a roadblock! Mark the finance deadlines on your calendar: Sep 15, 2019, for Fall, Dec 15, 2019, for Winter and Mar 15, 2020, for Spring. Plan ahead and don’t wait until the last minute to make sure you are financially cleared.” – Brandon Parker, vice president of financial administration (Of course the school’s CFO would give advice about finances!)

“Technology is an important resource but it’s not always easy to know how to use it most effectively for your studies. Talk to your professor about what they recommend. Practice unplugging from your phone and social media while you study until you can sustain 30 or 40 minutes of undistracted work followed by a 5 or a 10-minute break.” – Chantel Blackburn, professor of mathematics 

“It’s a fresh start. Reach outside your comfort zone to say hi to someone and meet new friends.” – J.R. Rogers, associate vice president of student life

 “Get Organized! In college, your success is up to you (not your parents or teachers any longer). This means you need to develop a study plan, be aware of homework/paper/finals deadlines, and communicate effectively/timely with your professor. Knowing, Who, What, When, Where, and How is invaluable!!!” – Stacy Nelson, associate vice president of human resources 

“It’s helpful to get into a mindset of being excited or at least curiously inquisitive about learning new material from every course you take.” – Elaine Neudeck, assistant professor of physical science 

“Your college years are when you are the freest you will ever be. Take advantage of this! Try new hobbies. Travel. Visit museums and attend events while you can still get student discounts. Ask lots of questions. Study abroad. Explore different ways of doing things. Take elective courses just to learn something new and fun. Be a student missionary. Say yes when new friends invite you out, or when your professor has a student dinner at their home. Whatever it looks like for you, don’t miss the plethora of opportunities to explore new aspects of life during college; it sets the tone for the rest of your life.” – Becky St. Clair, department of music office manager, PR writer

Keep these tips in mind as you begin your first quarter of college and remember, great advice is just a question away, so ask! 

 

PUC in Pictures: Summer 2019

Even though summer is fun and filled with adventures, we couldn’t be more thrilled to welcome everyone back to campus for another exciting year! Before the new year get’s underway, let’s take a look at some of our favorite moments over the past few months.

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Summertime, and the livin’ is easy

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“Home sweet home” -@hgranados4

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👀 check out those moves!

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Give us a follow on Instagram (@PUCNow) and browse through some of our hashtags for a closer look at student life at PUC. #PUCAdventures is a great place to start!

New Student Orientation is Next Week! 

We are so excited for you and your family to be joining our Pioneers Family! The beauty of the NSO program is that it is specifically planned to help your transition into our college community. 

Here are a couple of things to do while you are eagerly (or anxiously) awaiting the start of your new adventure:

Join the Class of 2023 Facebook Group: If you haven’t already, join the Class of 2023 Facebook group and start meeting your future classmates!

Start Packing: Don’t become overwhelmed thinking about all the things you will need to have in your dorm room throughout the year. To help you out, we’ve put together “Your College Packing List”  on our blog, so you can refer to as you start getting ready to move in. If you need some inspiration for how you can help make your dorm room look and feel more like home, check out our “Dorm Decorating on a Budget” and “Tips for an Organized Dorm Room” blog posts for some ideas to help get you started!

Mark your calendars to arrive on Wednesday, September 18. Move-in begins at 9:00 a.m. In the meantime:

Have questions? Our team of counselors can answer any you have. Call (800) 862-7080, option 2 or email admissions@puc.edu to get connected with a counselor now.

Set some reminders for these important dates! 

  • New Student OrientationWednesday, September 18 — Sunday, September 22
  • Classes BeginMonday, September 23
  • Week of WelcomeMonday, September 23 — Saturday, September 28

Hey transfer students, we didn’t forget about you! We have a special site with information regarding transfer student move-in time and Orientation. Visit the Transfer Student Orientation page.

ATTENTION PARENTS! We know this is a big adjustment, not just for your student but also for you, and we know you probably have questions. Well, we have a site for you too!

We are so excited to meet all of you, see you soon!

The Honors Program Takes to the London Streets

This summer, Dr. Peter Katz, professor of English and new director of the Honors program, accompanied a group of Honors program students on a study tour to London, UK. These students were taking HNRS 380: London Streets. In this course they learned about Victorian politics and life in London, considering the ethics and obligations of seeing poverty (then and now).

Now that they have returned from their European jaunt, Dr. Katz graciously accepted our request to guest blog about his incredible summer experience.

“I am starting my fifth year as a teacher in the English department, and my first year as Honors Director. (I was also an Honors student at PUC from 2006-2010.) My scholarship focuses on empathy and emotion, particularly through Victorian literature and culture; my teaching focuses on pretty much whatever needs teaching, though somehow it will end up being about empathy and emotion (and animals). I love coffee, martial arts, and animals, though usually not simultaneously. London Streets was my first abroad tour as a professor, and I think it changed me just about as much as it did the Honors students.”

 

In Defense of Victorian Optimism

By: Peter Katz

I completely missed him.

I’d like to think I was concerned with my students’ safety, was looking at my phone to find a route to our next destination. 

But that’s probably untrue. 

 More likely, as I’ve trained myself to do, I skipped over him as part of the scenery. 

 But Sarah didn’t.

 Can we get him some food? He looks really bad.

 Open sores. Brittle, skeletal. Homeless. 

 *****

For the last three weeks, the six students of HNRS 380: London Streets had walked the alleys of Victorian London. They waited beside a young Dickens with his father in Marshalsea Prison. They crowded into the cloying humidity of the attic operating theater in St. Thomas’ Hospital and witnessed the frantic amputations in a race against infection. They stood over the cesspool where the 1854 Cholera epidemic began, scoured the streets with Dr. John Snow as he wrapped his head around a new theory of disease transmission. 

 New institutions lunged up from the cultural fabric, bent and warped the channels through which the city’s bodies flowed. New feelings, new modes of embodiment became possible, even as those structures altered or cut off old formulations—sometimes for the benefit of the working people, sometimes not. 

 This is a value-neutral statement. One of my favorite mantras before I describe how those institutions changed feelings and bodies. Neither inherently good, nor bad. Value-neutral. 

 *****

 Sarah is always driven. We joke that she finishes the course readings before I’ve finalized the syllabus. 

 I’ve never seen her as focused as she was in that moment. She parted the clotted streets of Camden Town with the precision that would make a Victorian surgeon weep. Straight to a coffee shop with premade sandwiches and bottled drinks as though the crowd didn’t exist. She fired off a prescription:

 Protein. Handed me a sandwich. 

 Fruit. 

 Hydration. 

 Rang it up. Back to the streets, back through the crowd. 

 Stop. Spinning, intent, distraught. 

 Where did he go?

 *****

 Value-neutral. 

 For better or worse, one of my other favorite teacher phrases is: now this is an argument, so feel free to push back. History should be contentious. It should challenge our assumptions, pick apart our received knowledge. I don’t give dates and names. I give arguments. 

 Now, this is an argument, so feel free to push back: institutions are inherently value-neutral. They’re a historically continent attempt to address the pressures of population-dense urban centers, of increasingly complex pecuniary and social economies.

 Victorian institutions create problems, to be sure. We shrank before the physical restraints in Bedlam psychiatric hospital. We cringed as the Salvation Army celebrated military metaphors like “opening fire” to describe their social work. We balked as the hospital transformed patients into statistics and problems to solve. 

 But they also fix problems. Bedlam begins conversations about the expression of psychological pain, begins to embrace the infinite multiplicity of human experience. The Salvation Army insists that the poor matter, propels the welfare state to its (European) prominence, protects the poor more than laissez-faire ever could. The hospital defeats cholera, extends life-expectancy, heals and helps anyone in need. 

 The Victorians had their problems: the Empire, horrific misogyny, paternalistic classism. 

But no one can say they didn’t care. 

 *****

 Victorian fiction of the 1880s stages a three-way battle between unbridled capitalism, socialism, and liberal reform. The capitalists rarely earn a voice in these texts; their ideology is just fundamentally broken. 

 The real debate occurs between the socialists and the liberals. The socialists argue that the system is broken and requires a complete overhaul to fix. Anything short of that is a waste of energy at best, or worse, a secret tool of the capitalists. They’re earnest, sincere. The city is broken, and they want to scrap it and start again. 

 The liberal protagonists of these texts present an argument that feels naïve. The system, the city, is sprawling, an often indomitable mass too large to get hands or heads around. The system is broken. 

 But, as Valentine of Children of Gibeon rebukes her brother, “Go away and rail at Competition, while we look after its victims.” 

 If we care hard enough about each individual person, the liberals argue, we might not fix the system—but we’ll fix that person, if only for a while. And if we all care, and all help, maybe the city can fix itself. 

 Is it naïve? Maybe. Is it optimistic? Perhaps. Beautiful? Absolutely.

 *****

 We find him. He’s trying on a new pair of shoes someone had dropped. 

 I look away. It feels like a violation of his privacy to watch—a violation of a concept completely unavailable to him. 

 He finishes, slumps back down against the lamppost. Sarah gives him food. We walk away.

Back to the coffee shop, where some of the other students wait. They talk about the stores around them. Laugh, joke, show each other things on their phones. 

 Except for Sarah. She stands, stares unseeing into the wall as she drinks. She is very definitely not crying. Neither am I.

 I manage to catch her eye. And as we give each other a reassuring hug, I’m quite sure we’re hugging him as well. 

 

PUC, A Beach Town?

By: Dana Negro

When you think of the Napa Valley, surrounded by beautiful vineyards and majestic forest beds, you don’t immediately think of the beach but you might be surprised. 

As someone born and raised in a beach town, the thought of spending my college years away from easy access to sand and waves was enough to give me pause. But what I came to find is PUC is in the PERFECT location—whether you love to hike the forest, ski the slopes, or yes, catch a wave—you’re just a short road trip away. And because I’m kind, I’ll spare you the googling and tell you five of the best beaches near PUC. You’re welcome!

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Dillon Beach (1 hour and 25 minutes from PUC)

Would you like to know the absolute best thing about Dillon Beach? It’s a dog beach! That’s right, there are puppies everywhere. Pack up your car with some blankets and friends, swing by Giugni’s for some sandwiches, and head off for an afternoon of relaxing and puppy-petting. Pro-tip: Official beach parking is $10 so unless you want to park in town and take a nice walk, you’ll need to bring some cash. Have everyone in the car chip in! 

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Goat Rock Beach (1 hour and 30 minutes from PUC)

Goat Rock is probably the beach most frequented by PUC students. Every year the Student Association, as well as multiple student clubs, have both church and vespers services here. Pro-tip: The area is a harbor seal birthing place between March and July so during those months we wouldn’t necessarily recommend going for a swim, BUT it’s a great spot to view incredible sea life and maybe catch a cute seal pup on camera. 

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Fort Point Beach (1 hour and 51 minutes from PUC)

Surfs up! While Fort Point isn’t the closest beach in the San Francisco area, it’s worth the extra drive simply for its beautiful location. Fort Point Beach lives right under the famous Golden Gate Bridge which guarantees a great view and great photo opportunities! Head towards the city, grab a board, and hang ten. Pro-tip: If you’re not from around here, it’s important to note: you’ll want to bring a jacket and if you’re surfing, a wetsuit! 

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Capitola Beach (2 hours and 49 minutes from PUC)

Located in the heart of the quintessential beach in Santa Cruz County, Capitola is by far not only my favorite beach but also my favorite place on earth. Take a break from the ocean by wandering in and out of the cute little village shops, grab a slice from the famous Pizza My Heart’s original location, or treat yourself to some local ice cream. You really can’t go wrong. And if you’re looking for that perfect photo opportunity, you don’t have to look far, with a row of brightly colored buildings locals refer to as “The Venetians” right on the water’s edge, you really can’t take a bad shot. Pro-tip: Wait till sunset for even more stunning photos.

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Glass Beach (2 hours and 50 minutes from PUC)

Do love collecting sea glass? Spending time looking for that bright cobalt blue color? Or maybe just looking at and taking photos of it? Glass Beach is pretty famous for its coastline covered in colorful glass pieces smoothed from years in the sea. The glass makes up about half the shore and mixed with the dark-colored sand, is a pretty remarkable sight. Pro-tip: It’s actually illegal to remove any cultural or natural features from a state beach so be sure to take lots of photos and selfies! 

Well, there you have it, folks! Five fantastic beaches for when you really need some ocean therapy and time away from campus. For more information about life in Northern California, visit our NorCal page on the PUC website! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Important New Student Deadlines

Are you planning on being at PUC this fall? Here are some important dates and deadlines you will want to make note of!

  • Pay enrollment fee — ASAP
  • Register for classes with your academic advisor — ASAP
  • Check Your PUC Email — Weekly
  • Complete the housing reservation application — ASAP
  • Provide admissions with your final Transcript
  • Submit your health information form — August 1
  • Complete the immunization form — August 15
  • Finalize your financial arrangements — August 26
  • Authorize parent or third party to receive notifications of billing statements (not required)
  • Register for New Student Orientation (NSO) — August 30
  • Register your parents/family members for Parent/Family Orientation — August 30
  • Select a dining plan—September 1
  • Download the New Student Orientation app—September 16
  • Register your vehicle—September 16
  • Complete alcohol education/sexual assault prevention online courses—August 30
  • Waive of accept health insurance—October 4
  • Submit documentation for disability support and accommodations (if needed)— ASAP
  • Attend New Student Orientation—September 18 (REQUIRED)

If you have any questions related to New Student Orientation or arrival, you can contact the office of student life at studentlife@puc.edu or (707) 965-73626, and the team will be able to answer your questions or point you in the right direction. We are so excited to help you begin your journey as a Pioneer and to welcome you in September!

Middle School Students Learn & Have Fun at PacificQuest

Pacific Union College held its annual PacificQuest program on June 23-28, welcoming high-achieving middle school students to campus for five days of learning and fun. The program is designed to provide gifted students with the opportunity to explore college-level courses and encourage them to pursue a college education. 

This summer, PacificQuest offered students three exciting hands-on classes: Chemistry, taught by Dr. Kent Davis, chair of the department of chemistry, which explored the idea that properties of matter are a consequence of the three-dimensional shapes of molecules; Computer Programming & Game Development, taught by Dr. Chantel Blackburn, associate professor of mathematics, which gave students the opportunity to learn about coding through an introduction to the computer language C#; and Technology, taught by Professor David Bell, chair of the department of business, which delved into the world of Artificial Intelligence.

PacificQuest welcomed students from all over the West Coast, including Canada, and one student came as far as France! Outside of classes, there was a talent show and a quiz bowl, with plenty of free time at the gym where students played basketball and volleyball. 

Let’s hear from the students themselves about their experience at PacificQuest last week!

What did you like the most about going to PacificQuest?

“We could learn and have fun with others.” — Nathanael A., Angwin, Calif.

“I really just liked the general dynamics of the whole group and how we all can just enjoy everything as friends.” — Kyle S., Bishop, Calif.

“I liked getting to know others and I loved walking around the beautiful campus.” — Shania M., San Diego, Calif.

“I liked the opportunity to connect with friends and counselors and finding who I am supposed to be.” — Cambria H., Angwin, Calif. 

“I liked the night programs outside of classes and the opportunity to find new class interests.” — Mhina C., Los Angeles, Calif.

“I liked hanging out with my friends and making memories with them.” — Sabrina Y., Napa, Calif.

“I was really happy to meet new people and learn in a Christian environment.” — Reagan G., Arroyo Grande, Calif.

“Everything! PQ was great!” — Georgia B., Sequim, Wash.

What was your favorite class?

“I liked them all but I think my favorite was chemistry.” — Kyle S., Bishop, Calif.

“My favorite class was chemistry because of how interesting it was learning about molecules.” — Chet G., Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada

“The computer classes and chemistry experiments.” — Mike H., Houston, Texas

What was your favorite thing outside of classes during the week?

“Learning about others and talking to people.” — Nathanael A., Angwin, Calif.

“I liked meeting new people and the talent show.” — Grady S., Bishop, Calif.

“End of the day activities, rec and free time, basically just us being us.” — Cambria H., Angwin, Calif. 

Tell us something really interesting you learned at PacificQuest.

“I learned the structure of atoms.” — Nathanael A., Angwin, Calif.

“I learned that something called quantum numbers exist.” — Nathan S., Modesto, Calif.

“I learned about valence electrons and ions.” — Cambria H., Angwin, Calif. 

“There is an artificially intelligent robot that can balance on two wheels.” — Kyle S., Bishop, Calif.

“How to do experiments.” — Mhina C., Los Angeles, Calif.

“I learned how to program minesweeper.” — Grady S., Bishop, Calif.

“I liked learning how to read the periodic table.” — Sabrina Y., Napa, Calif.

“I learned more about valence electrons and the periodic table.” — Reagan G., Arroyo Grande, Calif.

Learn more about PacificQuest at puc.edu/pacificquest. Course information and the application for 2020 will be available later this year. Questions? Contact Professor Aimee Wyrick, chair of the department of biology and PacificQuest academic director, at pacificquest@puc.edu