Great Places to Study on PUC’s Campus

When I was in college here at PUC, my favorite place to study was at the Campus Center coffee shop, The Grind. I enjoyed having background sound and people milling around. (For more about how much I love the college’s Campus Center, read my blog post “PUC’s Campus Center Will Be There For You”!) But not everyone is like me, which is what is so great about being at PUC. The campus offers a variety of study spaces for both group and solo studying. From the library to individual department study spaces, you’ll never have far to go to find a great spot to crack open your books.

Below are photos of just a few places here on campus that are ideal for studying. There are also plenty of other spaces available to students, including lounges in the departments of music, English, and visual arts.

The student lounge for the department of history in Irwin Hall.

The student lounge for the department of world languages & cultures in Irwin Hall.

The library has a lot of study spaces for students.

More study spaces in the library.

Outside the library is a great place to hang out too!

The Campus Center is always packed full of students studying or enjoying a coffee break.

It’s a good idea to bring your headphones to the Campus Center if you’re trying to study!

There are plenty of places in Fisher Hall, home to the department of visual arts, for students to study, including the art studios, shown here.

Explore Outside the Classroom

By Kaleb Zenk

So, you’re the type of person who is excited to finally graduate from high school and escape the tight-knit rule your parents have had over you since the dawning of time. You’re excited for the possibilities of beginning a new life abroad, forging new relationships and learning communities, and ready to adapt to that inner self-reliance. You’re ready to own the next four years and have fun!

Or

You’re the opposite of excited for what lies beyond high school. Your parents have been your best friends your entire life, and living in a comfortable space, totally and completely content of the decisions made on your behalf, give you sense of consistency and routine. Inherently, you want to learn, have fun, and enjoy new relationships, but the steps to get to a place of comfortability in a new environment gives you anxiety!  

Rest assured

No matter how you react to the big leap from high school to college, the beauty of this transition lies not only in what you learn in the classroom, but what you can learn beyond it. No matter the style of personality you have when stepping onto campus for the first time, there is assuredly a place for you anywhere and anytime that you can feel comfortable in, making college a home away from home.

Photo courtesy of RecRadio.org

Intramurals

Although staying inside and playing League of Legends on your PC is a great community-building activity, playing sports is also a fantastic way to get outside and meet other people. Here at PUC, we have several intramural sports teams, ranging from badminton to flag football. We’re passionate about our small and diverse community, and it’s truly an amazing opportunity to learn from the multifaceted backgrounds you’ll encounter here. As such, sports can help anyone integrate. But the arena of physical activity and coordination may not be your thing, and that’s totally fine! There are other fantastic opportunities waiting for you once you arrive here.

Internships

Feel free to scroll past this next one if you’re pursuing a pre-professional program—or don’t!

Like myself and a few others here at PUC who happen to not be enrolled in a pre-professional program, landing an internship is quintessential for getting the ball rolling immediately after, or before your college experience ends. It’s also a fantastic way to develop your skills outside the classroom and meet thought leaders in your respective field of study.

If you haven’t perused Craigslist, Glassdoor, or LinkedIn in search of an internship opportunity, give it a try! LinkedIn in particular will become your best friend as you search for that perfect opportunity that aligns with your skill sets. You can follow thought leaders in your field, apply to job descriptions that are screaming your name, or just learn a bit more about the professional environment!

Explore places you’ve never been before!

PUC’s location is prime for several reasons—we’re nestled atop a mountain far, far away, sure …  but we’re a short 1.5-hour drive to the beautiful and illustrious city of San Francisco. Pier 39, Mission Dolores Park, Market Street, eateries galore, etc. You’ll never run out of things to do in SF, as there are attractions for everyone!

A fun fact: As of recently, various startups in the Bay Area such as Lime or Bird have provided the city with electric scooters to those who want to adventure, but don’t want to spend their money on Uber or Lyft. Simply download the app, enter your payment information, and you’re good to go!

Scooters cost an initial $1 to unlock, and a subsequent .15 cents per mile thereafter. Ride down the Embarcadero to grab a coffee or latte at Blue Bottle and a delicious tacro— taco croissant— from Vive La Tarte at the Ferry Building!

If you’re interested in events and meeting new people, check out SF fun cheap or SF Station. They’re great resources with a list of upcoming events if you’re into music, comedy, theater, etc.

No matter what …

There are so many opportunities at PUC to get involved, whether locally or right here on campus. Feel free to reach out to upperclassmen or anyone who knows the area, because they’d be glad to provide you with some hints and tips for making the most out of living in the Napa Valley. Most importantly, college is an extremely exciting time of your life, and the opportunities to stay busy and have fun are endless! It may take a bit of networking, researching, and putting your best foot forward, but you can truly make your time at PUC one of the best experiences of your life.

The Grind: A Showcase of a Student Job on Campus

By Michael Morales

What’s something everyone worries about when first starting life at a new school? I’ll tell you: Meeting. New. People. Even if you manage to get out there and meet new people, there’s no guarantee your schedule will allow you to maintain those friendships! Meeting new people is definitely a stressful part of college. However, it can also be one of the most memorable things about your college experience. If you find yourself nodding your head while reading the above statements, have I got a tip for you!

Try applying for a job in the Grind—the quaint little coffee shop located inside the Campus Center! Why do I suggest working at a coffee shop is a good way to meet people? Here’s a list of reasons I compiled from simply being a barista myself:

The Coffee

One of the perks of being a Grind employee is the fact you get to surround yourself with a drink that makes the world go around—coffee. Working as a barista really opens your mind to the world of coffee and the drinks involved in it. Trust me, you’ll easily be able to explain to your friends the difference between a caramel latte and a caramel macchiato. After being immersed in coffee culture, you can use that as a talking point with other coffee enthusiasts on campus (of which there are many).

The Customer Service

A great skill working at the Grind will help you develop is a positive work ethic and cheerful attitude towards customers. Since you’ll be a barista/cashier employee, you have the chance to make a service interaction truly memorable and personal. If a person is unsure about what to order, you can use your developed coffee knowledge to recommend a drink that suits the customer. Before long, you might see the faces of people who come often to get their coffee fix. You can learn their name, their favorite drink, and even become good friends!

The Team

Apart from being a master barista with a knack for good service, is perhaps the best part of working at the Grind—your team. Your co-workers have got your back whenever you need them, and they know you got theirs too. Each person is so unique with their own set of skills that makes the Grind a truly unique work experience. Some can dance, some can stock items like a beast, and some can make drinks faster than you can say “Man, I love Colloquy!”

Overall, the Grind is a great place to work if you’re eager to meet new people at PUC. You meet customers and co-workers alike, each with their own personality traits that makes the student body so diverse. Not to mention you get to say “Yeah, I’m a barista now” to anyone you meet. That, in and of itself, should be motivation enough to get out there and give it a shot! Who knows, you might find yourself loving it a latte.

Life as a C.C. Sports Writer

By Andrew Kim

When I think about sports, sports are more than physical activities that occur for entertainment purposes, keeping people healthy, and building character. Sports serve as one of many crucial elements of everyday life that keeps athletes, fans, and society energized, emotional, motivated, and inspired in life. When journalists report on sports stories, they share the same passion with sports fans and athletes. That’s the main reason why I am a communication major here at PUC with plans on becoming a sports journalist so I, too, can share my passion and enthusiasm of sports I follow on a daily basis. In addition, I knew to continue to build towards my future path, I needed to gain experience in learning and writing about sports. That all was reaffirmed when I joined the staff of the Campus Chronicle, PUC’s student-run newspaper.

The first time I heard of the Campus Chronicle here at PUC was during my first week as a freshman, when I visited the Chronicle offices at the Campus Center to gain an idea of what the organization was like and how they reported on story ideas on a weekly basis. It was not until the following year as a sophomore, where I spent my freshman year attending meetings but not proposing any sports stories then, where I decided to write my first sports article, which was about NASCAR and a racing event that recently occurred. Because of my childhood obsession of NASCAR, I knew a lot about NASCAR and I thought writing about it for the Chronicle would be perfect enough for me to do on a regular basis. Little did I know I had a lot more about sports writing and reporting to learn.

There were mixed emotions after my NASCAR article was published in the following Campus Chronicle edition. Part of me was happy with what I wrote and published for the first time for the Chronicle, but there was another part of me that felt like the Chronicle would not be overly excited about me only writing about NASCAR on a continuous basis. I knew for my next assignment, I would have to learn more about other sports. That was when I decided to learn about the PUC Pioneers, the college’s sporting teams from volleyball to basketball, and familiarize myself with their code of language, names of the athletes, the rules of the game, and what highlights to mention when writing.

I decided my first PUC Pioneers article I would write about would be a preview edition for the Pioneers heading into the 2017/18 season. I visited the Pioneers website and analyzed the Pioneers’ stats from last season, among which included how many games they won or lost and how close they came in making the Cal Pac tournament. I then turned my attention to the roster to know who represents the Pioneers in what sport, mention any newcomers to the Pioneers family, and break down the schedule for the upcoming season. Researching online and communicating with key Pioneer staffs that included coaches Greg Rahn and George Glover along with Brittany Brown, the athletics director, provided for me a clear background on sports that included basketball, volleyball, and cross country. After turning in the article, I felt both relieved and pleased with my first completed task as a Campus Chronicle sports writer, but also knew that this was only the beginning.

The next task I took, when writing about sports for Campus Chronicle, occurred on January 15, 2018, where I participated and reported my first Pioneers men’s basketball home game against UC Santa Cruz. Throughout the first half of the game, I kept track of the number of points made by each team, who contributed to scoring a point, and thought it would be a piece of cake. Then, someone gave me an official report sheet that covered the shots and stats of each player. By the time the game ended, I left with mixed emotions, one feeling happy for the Pioneers winning the game and having a lot to recap and write about the game, but also disappointed and felt I came unprepared and did not know what some of the stats meant. On the bright side, the game provided a general overview of what specifics, stats, and top plays to cover throughout an event and the importance of writing based on my knowledge of sports. The first game encouraged for me to participate in more games to familiarize myself with the Pioneers’ environment and the significance of their endless fight in making championship runs as underdogs. The more I went, the more I came back having more to write about the Pioneers and their top highlights from each game, along with including interviews with coaches and featured athletes. Even in times where I did not travel out to a Pioneers game, I spent a majority of my spare time following sports, both at PUC and out in the world, chronologically and familiarizing myself with what to cover or mention as a sports journalist.

Working for the Campus Chronicle as a sports writer has and continues to be a great learning experience. For starters, I am more familiarized with the PUC Pioneers and know more about their accomplishments compared to not knowing anything significant about them on my first day as a PUC student. Looking at the big picture, being a Chronicle sports writer provides for me a general view of the work sports journalists and broadcasters cover across the globe along with the resources, code of language, and overview they need to familiarize themselves with before, during, and after an event. Learning about different types of sports has lead me more in analyzing how to write and report on sports stories in a way where I can share the same enthusiasm, knowledge, and passion about sports.

PUC in Pictures: Spring 2018 Edition

As we start sorting through the hundreds of graduation photos from this past weekend’s celebrations, we want to take a moment to look back on some of our favorite moments from spring quarter at PUC.

LOVE THIS! Thanks, @angelty_!

A post shared by Pacific Union College (@pucnow) on

BTS 🎓 shot from our inside (wo)man!

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Have a wonderful summer everyone! We’ll see you in the fall.

How Being an Athlete Helped Me

By Lauren Purdom

Whenever I tell people I will be graduating from Pacific Union College, 90 percent of the time they have no idea as to its whereabouts. Coming from a highly populated city and high school, to joining the Pioneers was a major transition and adjustment for me. Not only was it in a city that barely had 4,000 people but it was on a hill. It is also a private Christian-based college affiliated with the Seventh-Day Adventist Church. I was born and raised in a city in Southern California and went to a high school with over 2,000 students. Can you imagine the hallways! Seeing how I have played sports all my life and continued by playing on PUC’s women’s volleyball team, I feel like that made my transition into such a small college a whole lot easier.

Sports and sports teams even are full of diversity. In a sense so is PUC. This is one of the major reasons why I was probably able to adapt to the college when got up here. I already had the skill set to meet new people and create bonds by getting to know people and hang out with them. It also made it easier because when you join a team you meet a lot of people from different backgrounds you automatically have something in common withplaying sports!

Another reason why being an athlete helped me with my transition was because I was faced with adversity before I even got to college. Nothing and nowhere is perfect so you are always going to face obstacles and challenges. I played multiple sports as a child and was on two sports teams in high school so I was dealing with a variety of personalities. Because of PUC’s diverse population, I encountered numerous amounts of individuals from all over the world. These students came from a list of backgrounds and all were unique in their own way.

All in all, I feel being an athlete all my life was beneficial towards my transition into becoming a student-athlete here at PUC. I can sincerely say that the skills you learn and develop when you are on a team or in a teamwork environment not only build your confidence but are everlasting and will definitely help you with future endeavors.

PUC: A Place I Found My Spiritual Talents

By Jamal Armstrong

My name is Jamal Armstrong and I am a super senior social work major. Yes, I have been in college for five years. As I come to the end of my undergraduate career, I have become retrospective about how much I have grown at PUC and how I have been able to leave an impact. PUC has taught me many things. From learning to truly have my own personal relationship with Jesus Christ to how to manage my time better, I learned it all at PUC.

Coming here in September of 2013 after living on the East Coast for the previous four years was exciting for me. I came to college as a wide-eyed 18-year-old freshman who was simply excited to come back and live in the state where I was born. I like to consider myself an outgoing person so it didn’t take a long time for me to begin making friends and coming out of my shell. One thing I quickly became involved in was praise music. I absolutely love singing and I consider it a huge honor to be a vessel for Christ as I let Him use me to help lead out in praising His name. In a sense, I went through the ranks. I started out being on praise teams meant for smaller worship services and made my way through to leading out vespers and church. I recognized God gave me talents to lead in praise and I dove headfirst into that. Understanding I have talents the Lord gave me and having older worship leaders such as George Tuyu and Jason Decena to help mold me as a worship leader are things I am grateful for.

From a young freshman to a seasoned super senior, I have learned the best thing I can do as a follower of Christ is to be absolutely honest and open with how I praise Him on stage. People can see right through someone who is just going through the motions just as well as they can tell when someone is being genuine. For me personally, it is easy to be genuine because I consider myself a very introspective person. I like to know where I’m at mentally, physically, and emotionally and I like to know where I can improve. As I have grown up the past five years, I can honestly say I have learned to let others help me rather than rely on myself, and more importantly, I have learned how to rely on God. There will always be ups and downs in life but with God leading my life I know I will go far. As I get ready to set sail from PUC, I leave knowing my purpose in life and to always rely on God.