Category Archives: Campus Culture

London Streets: Honors photo blog

The Honors program’s summer trip to London was an incredible learning experience for both faculty and students. Their course, “London Streets” took them throughout the city, personalizing literature they’d studied in previous courses and bringing history to life. Here are a few of their favorite moments captured on film! 

 

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The first day on the train from Newbold to London, bright-eyed and ready to go. (Left to right, front: Amy Ramos (Exercise Science), Sarah Tanner (English), Grae McKelvie (BS Management); back: Ervin Jackson (Biochem), Sebastian Anderson (Graphic Design), a British person, Isabel McMillan (History)) (All class of 2021)

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On the train, first day of week 2: (Left to right: Ervin, Grae, Sebastian, Sarah, Amy)

 

 

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Where modern epidemiology and germ theory was born. This pump was ground zero for the cholera epidemic of 1854. (Left to right: Isabel, Ervin, Sebastian, Sarah, Amy, Grae)

 

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In the 19th-century operating theatre of St. Thomas’s hospital (front to back: Sarah, Sebastian, Grae, Isabel, Amy, Ervin)

 

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Suffragette propaganda in the People’s History Museum, Manchester (Sarah and Isabel)

 

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Saying goodbye on the last day (Isabel, Sarah, Amy; Sebastian in back)

 

 

 

 

 

London Streets: Reflections On A Summer Study Tour

By Becky St. Clair

For three weeks this summer, Peter Katz, director of the Honors Program and professor of English, led a study tour for honors students in London, UK. Their course, “London Streets” took them throughout the city, personalizing literature they’d studied in previous courses and bringing history to life. Together, professor and students considered the ethics and obligations of seeing poverty both in Victorian times and now, interrogated the intersection between scientific regulation of health and governmental power, and traced the geographic and cultural impact of industrialization. 

“This trip was the best possible way I could have imagined my first excursion into Europe,” said honors student Sebastian Anderson. “It was the perfect balance between checking off the typical tourist attractions and activities while also getting to explore London in a more intimate way through our class trips and our readings.” 

Two participating students agreed to share their reflections on specific parts of their trip with us, so we could share their experiences directly with you, our readers. 

Isabel McMillan, history major

After a walking tour about the crimes of Jack the Ripper, I commented that his story was a female-centric story. I wished that when we told the stories of his victims we didn’t have to focus so much on the men, and could talk more about the women and their stories. One of my classmates pointed out history is male-centered, and society is misogynistic, and our storytelling of history has to be male-centric. 

Contemplating this perspective, I came to the conclusion that while it is not entirely wrong, it’s also not entirely right. 

I remembered this exhibit on a ship I saw in a Swedish museum once. The exhibit’s storytelling began with two of the women who were on the ship when it sank. The researchers did as much research as they could on these women, and learned quite a bit. Part of what they found included records of a woman who was in charge of building the ship, and how she met with the king about its progress. They also discovered records of another woman who ran a business vital to the building of that ship, as well as court documents detailing stories of women involved with court cases (there were laws against women being involved in court cases, and yet..). There was so much more. Most of this history was pre-Victoria. What I’m trying to say is that researching women and their lives is possible. Hard, but possible. 

Another thing I realized in all of this was by saying history is misogynistic and society is created for the white man, it gives people an excuse to not even try researching women. Allowing people to say the only way to tell women’s stories is through the point of view of the men in their lives allows people to not try, and to not feel guilty about their lack of effort. And that is not acceptable.

Sarah Tanner, English major

In looking over notes from this trip, I realized beginning on July 9, I switched from titling my class journal entries “reflections” to “reactions.” It wasn’t a deliberate move, but it matched the intensity of my interaction with the class and topics as we worked through some genuinely difficult discussions. 

 If I could distill this class into one key point, it would be, “bodies matter.” Politics, institutions, and good intentions all have their place, but unless we prioritize human bodies, their needs, and their desires, our ability to successfully empathize and care for those around us will forever be stunted. I want to believe on some level, most people recognize the truth in this, but until one is confronted with the immediacy of this need, it’s easy to overlook. Personally, it took almost stumbling over a homeless man outside the underground in Camden for me to recognize the necessity of enacting care for these bodies. And even then, when faced with the reality of his fraught situation, it was clear not everyone in our group processed the experience in the same way. 

 This class instilled in me a sense of urgency, an impulse to look more closely at the people around me and consider how I can help. And as much as I love modern literature, I have learned to stand in defense of the Victorian optimism that maintains that something can be done for these bodies. It just requires a degree of awareness (I’m convinced) results from trips such as this one. 

 Checking in with a structure or area’s effective gravity and reading it against one’s own response to that place is a practice vital to the optimist’s project. It requires constant self-reflection and comparison to the world beyond what is immediately available in a physical or bodily sense. Paradoxically, it creates a simultaneous drive for introspection and increased connection with others. While seemingly contradictory, I think this oscillation is important; to empathize, one must have a personal attachment to the shared effect, and that requires a degree of knowledge of self and others.  

 This practice is something I will definitely carry with me long after we all fly home; Victorian optimism has taken a piece of my heart. I want to be more aware, to see myself and others as more than separate components of a larger system, to seek out individual bodies in need of physical and emotional care. And more than foundational awareness, I want to be available to anyone who feels that need as well. 

 

Academic Spotlight: Emergency Services

The emergency services programs at PUC prepare students to be leaders and highly skilled professionals in the emergency and fire responder fields. If you’re considering a career in the fire service, law enforcement, disaster relief, or emergency medical services, a degree in emergency services from PUC may be for you. 

 Programs offered:

  • A.S. in Emergency Services
  • B.S. in Emergency Management

 A Faculty’s Perspective

“By far my favorite thing at PUC is the people I have the opportunity to interact with every day. I love my students! They keep me on my toes. My co-workers have been so inviting and supportive. What more could you ask for?” – Matthew Russell, instructor of emergency services

Fast Facts 

  1. PUC’s emergency services program educates students who are seeking a two-year or four-year degree to prepare them for a wide variety of careers within the field of emergency services. Students interested in becoming EMTs and paramedics can take the A.S. degree route, while those wanting a management level position can continue on with the B.S. degree. 
  2. Training and volunteer emergency service opportunities are available to PUC EMS students at the Angwin Volunteer Fire Department. Students can gain real-life experience while still in school and also give their careers a head start! Read “Choose Your Own PUC Adventure: Be a Volunteer Firefighter” to get a behind the scenes look at what it’s like to volunteer with the AVFD. 
  3. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates emergency services professions will be among the fastest-growing fields in the U.S. through at least 2026. Employment of EMTs and paramedics is projected to grow rapidly, at about 15 percent from 2016 to 2026, which is much faster than the average for all occupations, with a median pay of $34,320 in 2018. For emergency management directors, employment is projected to grow at around 8 percent or about as fast as average for all occupations, and the median pay for those occupations was $74,420 in 2018. 

What You Can Do With This Major

There are a variety of different careers available for students interested in the essential intersection of healthcare and public service.

  • Emergency dispatcher
  • Emergency management coordinator
  • EMT/ambulance driver
  • Firefighter
  • Homeland security officer
  • Hospital/community emergency preparedness 

Learn more about the emergency services program at puc.edu/academics. Our team of admissions counselors can answer any questions you have about PUC’s EMS program, or the other majors the college offers. Call (800) 862-7080, option 2 or email admissions@puc.edu to get connected with a counselor now and start learning about all the options available to you!

PUC, A Beach Town?

By: Dana Negro

When you think of the Napa Valley, surrounded by beautiful vineyards and majestic forest beds, you don’t immediately think of the beach but you might be surprised. 

As someone born and raised in a beach town, the thought of spending my college years away from easy access to sand and waves was enough to give me pause. But what I came to find is PUC is in the PERFECT location—whether you love to hike the forest, ski the slopes, or yes, catch a wave—you’re just a short road trip away. And because I’m kind, I’ll spare you the googling and tell you five of the best beaches near PUC. You’re welcome!

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Dillon Beach (1 hour and 25 minutes from PUC)

Would you like to know the absolute best thing about Dillon Beach? It’s a dog beach! That’s right, there are puppies everywhere. Pack up your car with some blankets and friends, swing by Giugni’s for some sandwiches, and head off for an afternoon of relaxing and puppy-petting. Pro-tip: Official beach parking is $10 so unless you want to park in town and take a nice walk, you’ll need to bring some cash. Have everyone in the car chip in! 

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Goat Rock Beach (1 hour and 30 minutes from PUC)

Goat Rock is probably the beach most frequented by PUC students. Every year the Student Association, as well as multiple student clubs, have both church and vespers services here. Pro-tip: The area is a harbor seal birthing place between March and July so during those months we wouldn’t necessarily recommend going for a swim, BUT it’s a great spot to view incredible sea life and maybe catch a cute seal pup on camera. 

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Fort Point Beach (1 hour and 51 minutes from PUC)

Surfs up! While Fort Point isn’t the closest beach in the San Francisco area, it’s worth the extra drive simply for its beautiful location. Fort Point Beach lives right under the famous Golden Gate Bridge which guarantees a great view and great photo opportunities! Head towards the city, grab a board, and hang ten. Pro-tip: If you’re not from around here, it’s important to note: you’ll want to bring a jacket and if you’re surfing, a wetsuit! 

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Capitola Beach (2 hours and 49 minutes from PUC)

Located in the heart of the quintessential beach in Santa Cruz County, Capitola is by far not only my favorite beach but also my favorite place on earth. Take a break from the ocean by wandering in and out of the cute little village shops, grab a slice from the famous Pizza My Heart’s original location, or treat yourself to some local ice cream. You really can’t go wrong. And if you’re looking for that perfect photo opportunity, you don’t have to look far, with a row of brightly colored buildings locals refer to as “The Venetians” right on the water’s edge, you really can’t take a bad shot. Pro-tip: Wait till sunset for even more stunning photos.

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Glass Beach (2 hours and 50 minutes from PUC)

Do love collecting sea glass? Spending time looking for that bright cobalt blue color? Or maybe just looking at and taking photos of it? Glass Beach is pretty famous for its coastline covered in colorful glass pieces smoothed from years in the sea. The glass makes up about half the shore and mixed with the dark-colored sand, is a pretty remarkable sight. Pro-tip: It’s actually illegal to remove any cultural or natural features from a state beach so be sure to take lots of photos and selfies! 

Well, there you have it, folks! Five fantastic beaches for when you really need some ocean therapy and time away from campus. For more information about life in Northern California, visit our NorCal page on the PUC website! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your PUC Summer Checklist, Part II

Summer is in full swing, and we hope you’re having a blast, whatever you’re doing! Besides all the fun, there’s also plenty to do if you’re an accepted student and are planning on being here in September. (If you aren’t accepted and don’t know what you still need to take care of, check out our “Your PUC Summer Checklist, Part I” blog post and get in touch with your admissions counselor for more details.) 

If you’ve taken care of the important things like paying your enrollment fee and worked with your advisor to register for classes, here are five things you can do to be as prepared as possible for New Student Orientation, which starts on Wednesday, September 18! 

Get your PUC ID card

Your PUC ID card is one of the most important things you can have! Not only does it allow you to buy books at the PUC Bookstore and check-in and out of events giving you credit, but it’s also how you eat! Set up a visit and get your ID card ahead of time

Talk with the Teaching & Learning Center

Starting college can be challenging, but at Pacific Union College, we have great resources in place to help students succeed, because student success is our priority. The Teaching & Learning Center was created for that very reason and offers free group tutoring and a writing lab. The TLC staff will also work with students who have disabilities to offer extra individualized support and accommodations. You can reach out to them by calling (707) 965-7688 or emailing tlc@puc.edu

Register your vehicle with Public Safety

All PUC vehicles are required to have a parking permit displayed at all times. You can pre-register your vehicle using your Lantern account, using information from your driver’s license, state vehicle registration, and vehicle insurance. Visit the Public Safety website at puc.edu/publicsafety for more information and to get started.

Start buying supplies for your new dorm room

One of the most exciting things about getting ready for college is buying supplies and thinking about decorating your dorm room. Where do you even start? That’s where our “Your Ultimate PUC Packing List” blog post comes in! Don’t forget to check in with your future roommate too so you don’t end up having two of everything. 

Reserve your books at the bookstore

Did you know you can buy or rent your textbooks from the PUC Bookstore? You can even pre-order them so all you’ll need to do is stop in and pick them up when you get to campus for Orientation. Get started now at puc.bncollege.com.  

We can’t wait to have you here in just a few weeks! If you haven’t already, don’t forget to register for New Student Orientation so everything is ready for you when you get here and officially join the Pioneers family.

 

Important New Student Deadlines

Are you planning on being at PUC this fall? Here are some important dates and deadlines you will want to make note of!

  • Pay enrollment fee — ASAP
  • Register for classes with your academic advisor — ASAP
  • Check Your PUC Email — Weekly
  • Complete the housing reservation application — ASAP
  • Provide admissions with your final Transcript
  • Submit your health information form — August 1
  • Complete the immunization form — August 15
  • Finalize your financial arrangements — August 26
  • Authorize parent or third party to receive notifications of billing statements (not required)
  • Register for New Student Orientation (NSO) — August 30
  • Register your parents/family members for Parent/Family Orientation — August 30
  • Select a dining plan—September 1
  • Download the New Student Orientation app—September 16
  • Register your vehicle—September 16
  • Complete alcohol education/sexual assault prevention online courses—August 30
  • Waive of accept health insurance—October 4
  • Submit documentation for disability support and accommodations (if needed)— ASAP
  • Attend New Student Orientation—September 18 (REQUIRED)

If you have any questions related to New Student Orientation or arrival, you can contact the office of student life at studentlife@puc.edu or (707) 965-73626, and the team will be able to answer your questions or point you in the right direction. We are so excited to help you begin your journey as a Pioneer and to welcome you in September!

Flex Your Creativity at PUC

Finding balance in life is essential, particularly during your college years at PUC. Taking time from your rigorous studies to grab a bite to eat with friends in the Campus Center, take a walk through the PUC forest, play a round of basketball in the gym, or tap into the creative part of your brain is a crucial part of your success. Lucky for you, PUC offers incredible options for all your balancing needs, especially when it comes time to flex your creative muscles. 

Whether you plan on graduating with an art degree or it’s just a hobby, there are tons of options from classes to take, groups to join, and workspaces to become immersed in. 

Out of the many courses offered in the department of visual arts, Typography might not be at the top of your list, but you never know what might spark your interest! Check out academic dean Milbert Mariano’s impressive 30 Typeface project.

Get your hands dirty behind the pottery wheel. PUC offers a ceramics lecture/lab combo course where you create special hand-built and wheel-thrown pieces!

Drawing and painting are fantastic stress relieving activities and the fine arts program offers the perfect outlet. There are plenty of classes to choose from and if you just want to use some studio space, I bet that can be arranged.

Hone your craft in the Fisher Hall studio space. This refurbished warehouse is the perfect place to work on all your art projects collaboratively or solo!

Are you the next Spielberg? PUC’s film program has incredible opportunities for those who long to be in front of and behind the camera. With state of the art equipment, yearly trips to SONscreen, and their own film festival in town, PUC film students really encompass creativity.

Let the music soothe your soul. Art isn’t just drawing and painting! Join one of PUC’s many band and choral ensembles or you can sign up to take private lessons in guitar, voice, or violin, to name just a few.

There are literally countless ways to express your creativity and we think PUC is the pretty perfect place to do it. Once you’re a Pioneer, there’s no stopping you!