Category Archives: Applying

Residential Life 101

There are tons of exciting and new things about going off to college. One of those is moving into a residential hall. Unless you went to a boarding academy (if you did you are pros already) this is likely your first time living ‘on your own’. You might be very excited about this or you might have a lot of anxiety surrounding the idea. Either way, you’re bound to have questions. Lucky for you, we have the answers! 

First of all, let’s cover how you even get a room assigned to you. It’s actually fairly simple because we’ll do it for you! Once you’re accepted, you’ll be asked to pay a $200 deposit and fill out a housing reservation form. This lets us know of your plans. Since rooms are assigned in the order they are received, it’s a good idea to do this ASAP! Room assignments are sent out in the summer. Something for you to look forward to. 

Now that we have that covered, what should you plan to bring with you? Each residence hall room contains two beds, dresser drawers, closets, desks and chairs, and one sink with a mirror. However, figuring out what else you’ll need to pack and bring to college can be difficult so to make it easier we came up with a packing list to help. Read our “Your College Packing List” post for ideas about what you probably should bring with you for your move up to PUC

Just because you’re not living at home with your family doesn’t mean you’re completely on your own. Each residence hall has a dean who lives in the building. They have a team of RAs or residence assistants, who work with them to ensure each student within their dorm is having the best experience possible. Their goal is for each student to feel like they’re part of the special Pioneers family. 

We asked RA, Alexis Keller to answer a few commonly asked questions about life in the PUC residential halls. 

What is an RA, what is your role?

An RA is a student leader in the dorms. We are there to provide educational, social, and spiritual opportunities for the residents! RA’s will do nightly “room checks,” stopping by each room to check-in and see how you’re doing. RA’s are also there to lend an ear (with confidentiality) if you want to talk about a rough day you had, a bad breakup, or if you need a shoulder to cry on, or just simply need to vent. Our rooms are always open if residents need a place to discuss any issues they are having, or just want to chill. Overall, RA’s are here to enhance your dorm life by being a resource for residents who have any questions/concerns, maintain a safe environment, create meaningful worship events, and plan fun social activities.

Will I have a curfew?

Yes, the curfew is 11 p.m. every night except for Saturday, where curfew is 12 midnight. This does not mean you have to be in your room, but simply in the building. Often residents will still be up in the various study areas of the dorm past curfew. There is also an extension to this curfew, which will be explained more during your orientation!

What social opportunities will I have in the residential hall?

There are many social opportunities in each residence hall! We typically do a big social event once a month, such as movie nights, pizza parties, pancake breakfasts, dorm Olympics, etc. Smaller social events will also happen on your own floor. Anything from a movie night, game night, tea time, and lots of others! Along with attending these social activities, you can put your own creative ideas to good use by working with your RA’s to come up with events that you would like to see happen in your dorm.

What spiritual opportunities?

Each residential hall has all-dorm worship that happens once a week with food, activities, music, and worship thought. Additionally, RA’s will have individual floor worship once a week where students can stop by for a quick snack and devotion. Along with the weekly scheduled worships, RA’s are available for one-on-one Bible studies with the residents. Even when we are not with our residents, we are always praying for them and their success!

What is one of the more challenging things about living in a residential hall and what are some ways you deal with it?

One of the more challenging aspects of living in a residential hall is learning how to live with another person in your space. Having a roommate or suitemate that is messy, has a different sleep schedule, different music tastes, or different living habits can be frustrating. It is important to always be communicative with your roommate as well as be willing to meet them halfway! College is a wonderful growing experience and these challenges can help you grow a closer connection with your roommate when handled correctly. You can always come to your RA’s to discuss any roommate disagreements and to talk about solutions and alternatives to make your living experience more comfortable and enjoyable.

What’s your favorite thing about living in the residential hall?

One of my favorite things about living in the residential hall is the sense of community. Through the various social and worship events, I get to know most of the residents in a more relaxed setting separate from the stress of school. Because we all live together, it is nice to be able to pop over to a friend’s room to hang out as well as to meet up with students within your major for study sessions.

 

How To Make The Most Of Class Time 

Sometimes the idea of sitting still and paying attention is too much to bear. I get it, really. With late nights and early mornings you’re probably tired, your classroom is warm, the idea of dozing off might seem very appealing. The thing is, you’re paying good money to be here so fight the urge to daydream your class away; get your money’s worth by making the most of your class time. Here are four simple ways to do just that. 

Be Engaged

Get into the habit of being attentive during class. Some classes are easier to pay attention to than others. A one or two-hour lecture might be more difficult than a class that requires your participation and interaction, so find something to help you stay engaged even if it’s something silly such as keeping track of how many times your professor uses a certain word or phrase. 

Take Notes 

Taking notes during class is also a great way to stay engaged during a lecture. Not only are you forcing yourself to stay engaged, but you’re also helping yourself by writing down things you’ll want to remember later. For some people, the act of physically writing things down even helps them retain that information. 

Ask Questions 

If you don’t understand something, ask. Your professors will always be happy to answer questions if you have them, even if you just need a little clarification. Not only does asking questions give you the answer you need, but it also shows your professor you’re engaged and care about their course. If you’re shy and don’t want to speak up in class, take advantage of office hours. 

Ditch the Phone

Did you know the average American checks their phone on average once every 12 minutes? If you’re sitting in class and you’re bored or having a hard time paying attention the urge to check your phone only multiples. That’s why we recommend ditching the phone altogether. Put it in your bag for the duration of class to cut the temptation. Also, it shows your professors you respect the work they put into their lectures. 

Even on the days you don’t feel 100 percent focused, make the most of your class time. Each lecture will be useful when it comes time to complete your homework or to study for quizzes and exams. Stay awake, stay focused, and make the most of your class time. If you find you’re struggling a bit with your coursework, check out some great resources PUC offers! 

 

15 Outside Scholarships To Apply For 

When you look at the cost for college, it’s important to keep in mind 100 percent of PUC students receive one or more forms of financial aid. In fact, we’ve awarded over $30 million dollars in financial aid to our students. However, even with all the scholarships PUC offers (which we encourage you to look at right now!), it’s still expensive. That’s why it’s important to look elsewhere for financial help. 

There are countless outside scholarship opportunities you can find online. Some of them are serious and require essays to be written while others are fun and ask for a video or project. The process to find those scholarships can be a little time-consuming, but don’t let that stop you from receiving free money. If you don’t know where to start looking for scholarships, here are 15 you can apply for.  

All About Education Scholarship 

Deadline: April 30, 2020 

Award: $3,000

Every student dreams of receiving free money for their college tuition. All this scholarship requires is an essay of 250 words or less about how a $3,000 scholarship for education will make a difference in your life. 

3rd Annual Litner + Deganian College Scholarship Program 

Deadline: March 31, 2020, at 9 a.m. EST. 

Award: $2,500

Litner + Deganian is looking for a creative-minded student to create a superhero focused on reducing car accidents and accident-related deaths among teens to be the mascot of their company.

Dr Pepper Tuition Giveaway 

Deadline: Re-opens mid-August 2020 

Award: $100,000 

Dr Pepper is awarding over $1,000,000 to help students reach their biggest goals. You must be 18-24 and attending school for the 2020-2021 year. You will need to submit a video talking about your academic and professional goals and how winning this tuition will impact your life. This giveaway does not open until mid-August, so you have time to be creative, show how passionate you are and give them a sense of who you are. 

Superpower Scholarship 

Deadline: March 31, 2020 

Award: $2,500

If you are a hero or villain enthusiast, this super scholarship can give you the power to win free college money. In 250 words or less, write about a superhero or villain you would want to change places with for a day and why. 

ResumeCompanion Annual Scholarship 

Deadline: July 15, 2020 

Award: $1,000

This fun award lets you create a resume based on the life of any fictional or nonfictional character, from TV, history, literature, or myth. The resume should not be about yourself or your own experiences. Resumes should be no longer than two pages and there is not a required GPA. 

Flavor of the Month Scholarship 

Deadline: July 31, 2020 

Award: $1,500

Everybody loves ice cream, so why not write about what flavor of ice cream you would be and why for $1,500! 

Fifth Month Scholarship 

Deadline: May 31, 2020 

Award: $1,500

This unique scholarship wants to know what is so special about five. In 250 words or less, write a letter to the number five explaining why five is important. You can either be serious or funny. 

2020 General Marketing Education Scholarship – Marketing Education 

Deadline: December 15, 2020 

Award: $1,000 

This scholarship requires you to submit a 1,000-word minimum essay about your educational goals and plans after graduation. You will also need to explain why you deserve to win this scholarship and what it would mean to you if you won. 

ServiceScape Scholarship 2020 

Deadline: November 29, 2020 

Award: $1,000 

To apply for this scholarship, ServiceScape wants students to write a 300-word essay on the topic of: How does writing impact today’s world? You also need to submit a headshot with your essay. 

Halloween Costume Scholarship 

Deadline: October 31, 2020 

Award: $1,000

The cost of college is pretty scary, but the thought of free money is far from spooky. All you have to do for this scholarship is write about your favorite costume worn by either you or your pet. 

Do-Over Scholarship 

Deadline: June 30, 2020 

Award: $1,500

In 250 words or less, you will need to write about a mistake you made and if you were allowed one do-over in life, what would it be and why? Don’t make the mistake of missing out on this scholarship.

GoSkills Scholarship 

Deadline: March 15, 2020 

Award: $2,000

If you are a female college student who wants to start your own online business, this scholarship is for you. Besides talking about yourself, you will need to share reasons why you’re scared of starting your business, what’s holding you back, and who your female boss role model is and why. This isn’t an essay, but more of a conversation. 

Build U. Scholarship 

Deadline: April 15, 2020 

Award: $2,500 Scholarship Each Semester 

If you are majoring in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM), this scholarship is for you. In less than 1,000 words, explain why you admire a company or organization that best exemplifies core values. You will also need to submit a short video answering the question: “What would the Build U. Scholarship mean for your education?” 

The Blades of Green Scholarship Fund 

Deadline: March 27, 2020 

Award: $1,000

If you are seeking environmental studies or related fields, this scholarship is for you. This scholarship is based on your academic excellence, the pursuit of further study in environmental education, and passion for further study. In 350-500 words, describe your career plans after graduation, passion for your intended field, and what inspired you to choose your career path. This application must be submitted by mail. 

University Frames Scholarship Program 

Deadline: June 15, 2020 

Award: $1,000

This scholarship is only for 3rd-year undergrad students who have a GPA of at least 3.0. You must write a 400-500 word essay describing your future goals after you graduate and what important lessons you have learned in school and how you will apply them in your future goals. You will also need to send a photo or selfie holding an invisible diploma frame. 

Don’t miss the opportunity of receiving free money for your education. There’s money out there just waiting to be given, all you need to do is look!

 

 

Prayer In Numbers

College is all about students learning and growing both personally and professionally. However, here at PUC, we care about your spiritual growth as well. One of the beautiful things about getting your education at our beloved College on the Mountain is the MANY different ways people worship. 

There are a variety of options on campus which is great since everyone is at a different place in their spiritual walk. If the typical Church service doesn’t sound appealing to you, try attending Friday night vespers, dorm worship, or the student-led Church called The Twelve. Not interested in staying inside? Take to the trails and worship God in nature. 

Still not sure these are for you? Start something new! Students are encouraged to take an active role in their spiritual journey. It’s always inspiring to watch young people develop their relationship with God but it’s even better to see students from different backgrounds and religions come together to support each other as they grow closer in Christ. 

Last year, Isaac Peterson, Dylan Gray, Jesse Zachawerus, Noah Ofisa, and Drew Biswas organically started their own prayer group. During their weekly study session, one of the five decided they should go around and convey what was in their hearts. After stories were shared, they decided to pray for each other and at that moment, what began as a small study group helping each other conquer the Greek language, turned into a weekly prayer group dubbed the ‘brotherhood of prayer’. As the group got closer they began to invite more people and the little prayer group expanded to accommodate an average of 50 people (yes, women are welcome in the brotherhood)!

This group consists of people from different upbringings and faiths who focus on genuinely connecting with, not preaching at, people. They strive to love, care, accept, and support each member as they share their journey. “I needed this. I didn’t go to an Adventist school growing up,” says Drew Biswas. “Knowing I have this community is everything to me. It’s not a group that’s just praying for each other, but a family of nonjudgmental people. It’s permanently changed me”.

If you’re interested in learning more about spiritual life on campus visit the Missions & Chaplain Services page on our website! 

 

 

 

Making Adventist Education Possible: A PUC Promise

Getting a college education is important for many reasons. Having a degree looks great on your resume, lots of jobs even require one. It can help you with future career success and satisfaction as well as provide you with long term financial stability. The one downfall is that college is expensive, but we like to think of it as an investment in yourself. Here at PUC, we are always working on ways to make that investment financially possible. 

Did you know the average student takes out loans EACH year of college? While that enables you to get the education you deserve, those loans add up and eventually, you have to pay them off. 😩 For most, getting your dream job (with dream pay) right out of college doesn’t happen so you might be worried about making enough money to afford student loans. This is why PUC is excited to be partnering with Ardeo Education Solutions to offer the first-ever Loan Repayment Assistance Program. LRAP is a financial safety-net we offer at no cost to you or your family. If your income after graduation is under $45,000, we can help you pay back your federal, private, and parent plus loans.

How does the PUC Promise work you ask? Well, it’s fairly simple.

  1. Visit  MYLRAP.ORG/PUC and follow the simple steps on the page
  2. Review and sign your LRAP award
  3. Graduate from PUC with a bachelor’s degree
  4. Work at least an average of 30 hours per week—in any profession (or more than one job if needed)
  5. Begin repaying your federal, private alternative, or parent PLUS loans
  6. The PUC Promise reimburses a percentage, or all, of your loan repayment

The PUC Promise is new and we’re sure you’ve got questions. Reach out to our Admissions team via phone (800) 862-7080, option 2, or email admissions@puc.edu for more information.

Please noteStudents who pursue nursing aren’t eligible for the PUC Promise. The good news is, PUC made that decision because most of our nursing graduates’ starting salaries are well over $45,000 annually. PUC is actually ranked for top-earning alumni with 2-year degrees because of our nursing graduates, and we want to focus this offer on students who are pursuing majors leading to careers with more modest starting salaries.

 

It’s Not Too Late, Apply Today

PUC is still accepting applications for the Winter quarter so it’s not too late to join us this January. And guess what? The process really isn’t that hard!  

Just follow these simple steps and you’ll be on your way to joining the Pioneers family.

  1. Complete a PUC application at puc.edu/apply
  2. Submit your application documents:
    • Official high school transcripts (showing graduation)
    • Official transcripts of all college work attempted/completed 
    • Send us your ACT or SAT scores. PUC’s school codes are: 0362 (ACT) and 4600 (SAT).

That’s it! Really, it’s that simple. 

Still a little confused? Visit our website for the complete and detailed admissions process.  Have a few questions? We welcome them! Email admissions@puc.edu or call (800) 862-7080, option 2 to talk with an admissions counselor. 

Remember, Winter 2020 starts on Monday, January, 6 and we would love to have you here.

 

Visit PUC This Winter!

Choosing what college to attend is a very important decision and one you shouldn’t make without doing a lot of research. There really is no better way to research colleges than by seeing the campus yourself. Grab your family or some friends and come visit PUC. Take a campus tour given by one of our student ambassadors, sit in on a class, chat with a professor, eat in our cafeteria, walk around the charming nearby towns of St. Helena or Calistoga, AND if you plan in advance, join us for any of the following upcoming and exciting events.

Pioneers Athletics Games

PUC has six varsity sports teams: cross country, basketball, and volleyball for women; and cross country, basketball, and soccer for men. Throughout the year, we invite you to our gymnasium, nicknamed the “Covered Wagon,” or our soccer field to join the Pioneers Posse and cheer on our teams. Here’s a short list of a few upcoming games; for the full schedule, visit pioneersathletics.com

  • Men’s Basketball vs La Sierra, Dec. 19, 7 p.m.
  • Women’s Basketball vs La Sierra, Jan. 9, 5:30 p.m.
  • Men’s Basketball vs La Sierra, Jan. 9, 7:30 p.m.

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Rasmussen Art Gallery Openings

If you’re interested in seeing some incredible works of art, you won’t want to miss the Rasmussen Art Gallery. Several times a quarter, a new exhibit opens at the college’s on-campus art gallery, which often features students, faculty, and other local artists. The opening reception is a chance to meet the artists, mingle with other guests, and enjoy some tasty snacks while appreciating the talent on display. If you can’t make it to one of the opening receptions, check with your tour guide to be sure to stop by and spend some time browsing during regular open hours. 

  •  Natalie Ciccoricco, Awaking West, Jan. 11-Feb. 9
  • Faculty Art Show, Literatura, Feb. 15-March 15 

For more information, visit the Rasmussen Art Gallery Facebook page

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Paulin Hall Music Concerts

PUC’s department of music has many concerts throughout the year; all of which are free to the public. The college has several ensembles that frequently perform, and there are usually multiple student recitals each quarter. For the Christmas holiday, there are several concerts we hope you can join us for! 

  • Christmas Candlelight Concert #1, Friday, Dec. 6, 8 p.m.
  • Christmas Candlelight Concert #2, Saturday, Dec. 7, 4 p.m.

Contact the department of music for more information; call (707) 965-6201 or email music@puc.edu.

music

Join Us For February College Days!

Several times a year, we host special visitation events called College Days. College Days is a jam-packed event where you will experience PUC with other visiting students. In addition to campus visit standards like touring the campus, talking with a professor in your major of interest, and eating in our Dining Commons, it’s a great opportunity to get a glimpse into what it’s really like to be a student at PUC as you stay in one of the residence halls and attend social and academic events. 

We hope you can make plans to join us for College Days on February 9-11, 2020. Register now! For more information about College days and other ways to visit, check out puc.edu/visitors.

 

We can spend hours explaining what we think makes life at PUC so unique and honestly, we really would be happy to, but nothing beats experiencing it firsthand, so schedule your visit today! 

Before you arrive, be sure to apply and send in your admissions documents for a quick acceptance! It will make your visit even more special as you officially become a member of the Pioneers family.

 

Take A Look at PUC’s Scholarships​

It’s really easy to get overwhelmed by the thought of paying for college. The thing is, all PUC students, 100 percent, receive at least one form of financial aid. Our finance team is committed to working with you and your family to be sure the opportunity of an Adventist education is possible whether it’s through scholarships, grants, or helping you understand the loan options available to you so don’t feel discouraged by the sticker price! 

PUC offers scholarships based on a variety of factors, including leadership, participation in music groups or athletic programs, and of course high GPA and high test scores. There are also scholarships available depending on your program of study, like the Adventist Mission Scholarship, available to theology and education majors. Visit puc.edu/scholarships to see all available scholarships. 

Here is just a preview of a few merit-based scholarships available. 

President’s Scholarship (Renewable with a 3.0 GPA)

    – 3.75-4.0 GPA or 29+ ACT / 1350+ SAT 

    – $13,000 / 4-Year Total: $52,000

Dean’s Scholarship (Renewable with a 3.0 GPA) 

   – 3.5-3.74 GPA or 26+ ACT / 1200+ SAT

   – $12,000 / 4-Year Total: $48,000

Trustee’s Scholarship (Renewable with a 3.0 GPA) 

   – 3.25-3.49 GPA 

   – $10,000 / 4-Year Total: $40,000

Founder’s Scholarship (Renewable with a 3.0 GPA) 

   – 3.0-3.24 GPA 

   – $9,000 / 4-Year Total: $36,000 

For high-achieving students, PUC offers the prestigious Maxwell Scholarship, worth up to a whopping $116,000. Students meeting qualifications receive full tuition based on their unweighted cumulative GPA and test scores; requirements are a 3.9-4.0 GPA and a 34+ ACT or 1500+ SAT. 

There are also several other PUC scholarships worth checking out, like the Legacy Scholarship for students whose parents attended PUC, and the Mostert Leadership Scholarship, which recognizes students for selected leadership roles held during their junior and/or senior years. 

Visit puc.edu/scholarships to see all available scholarships. If you have questions about what you might qualify for, don’t hesitate to reach out to our team of financial aid counselors, who can give you a financial aid estimate that shows what it might cost for you to attend PUC. Call (800) 862-7080, option 1 or email studentfinance@puc.edu to talk with a counselor now.

 

Get Started on Cal Grant

Hey California seniors! We hope you’re enjoying this new(ish) school year! It may seem early but it’s never a bad time to start thinking about applying for Cal Grant. 

What is Cal Grant?

Cal Grant is a financial aid program administered by the California Student Aid Commission that provides aid to California undergraduates, vocational training students, and those in teacher certification programs. The short version: A Cal Grant is money for college you don’t have to pay back!

Cal Grants can be used at most colleges in California. If you’re planning on attending a private non-profit California college like PUC, Cal Grant is worth up to $9,084 per year. That’s over $36,000 to help pay for four years of college—and it’s free!

How to Apply for Cal Grant

Applying for Cal Grant takes just two easy steps! To be considered for a 2020-21 Cal Grant award, you must complete the following requirements by March 2nd:

  1. Submit a 2020-21 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) or California Dream Act Application (CADAA)
  2. Ensure that a certified GPA is submitted to the California Student Aid Commission 

GPAs are accepted only if certified by a school electronically or submitted by using the CSAC official GPA verification form. No transcripts are accepted.

Helpful Links

 

Faces of PUC: Kharolynn Pascual Smith

Kharolynn Pascual Smith has been working as an admissions counselor for the past 10 months. Her focus is mainly on students interested in transferring to PUC, so if you’re thinking about transferring or know someone who is, Kharolynn is the perfect person to reach out to. Let’s get to know a little more about Kharolynn! 

What brought you to PUC? How/Why did you decide to work here? 

An interesting conversation brought me to PUC somewhat unexpectedly. I decided to work here because I value Adventist Christian education at all levels and believed I could use my experience and abilities to help students. 

What is the best thing about being a part of the Pioneers family? 

I appreciate the diversity and contributing to a shared purpose, vision, and mission.

 Where is your favorite place to eat in the Valley and why? 

Il Posto Trattoria in Napa. The food is freshly made and tastes great, it’s casual with unpretentious service, and I don’t have to save up for months to eat there.

 What is something you can do/want to do that might be surprising for people to learn? 

I’d like to do a jungle canopy zipline tour, which is surprising because I’m quite terrified of heights. 

 What is one song you’re listening to on repeat lately? 

I tend to repeat entire albums rather than just one song. Recently, I’ve been listening to a Yo-Yo Ma album of Bach Cello Suites a few times a week. It’s peaceful.

 Who is someone you admire and why? 

I admire people like Job in the Bible who have experienced extreme adversity and retained their trust in and praise for God in spite of everything. My grandmother and my friend, Mike, are two examples.

 Finish this sentence: On Sunday mornings you can find me …

Enjoying the chance to sleep until I wake up naturally rather than being forced awake by an alarm, then doing something leisurely, like reading, knitting, or baking.