PUC in Pictures: Spring 2019 Edition

Now that the dust has settled on Maxwell Commons after another graduation, we’re taking a moment to look back at some of the special moments over the past few months that made this spring quarter unforgettable. We also wish all of our graduates a huge congratulations and God’s richest blessings—we can’t wait to see what you do next!

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💖the heart of campus💖

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Gorgeous spring days ☀️

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Remember—You can follow PUC on Instagram and browse through some of our hashtags for a closer look at student life at PUC. #PUCNow and #PUCAdventures are good places to start!

We hope you have a great summer break and we can’t wait to see all of you back on campus in September!

Academic Spotlight: Music

The world is listening. Find energy and passion in new opportunities and challenges as you develop your artistic, technological, and entrepreneurial skills to make profound contributions to the future of music.

The department of music at PUC gives students a place to better understand, appreciate, and perform music while preparing them to use their talents in the professional world. Take courses from knowledgeable faculty who have toured the world and performed in places like Carnegie Hall, and discover how you can start your career in music under their expert guidance.

Programs offered:

  • A.S. in Music
  • B.S. in Music
  • B.S. in Music: Composition Emphasis
  • B.S. in Music: K-12 Teacher Training Emphasis
  • B.S. in Music: Performance Emphasis

A Student’s Perspective

“Being involved in a music ensemble relaxes me. It allows me to step outside of the daily struggles and focus on something I love, and I love that a lot of it is worship music. It’s an escape, it’s worship, and both are really valuable.” — Kayley Wilson, music major

Fast Facts

  1. Fully Accredited The department of music is a member of the National Association of Schools of Music, and a member of Pi Kappa Lambda, the national honor society in music, through its Theta Zeta chapter.
  2. Ensemble Options Students can join ensembles on campus that include the symphonic wind ensemble, orchestra, and a touring choir.
  3. Collaborative Environment Music students have partnered with film students to produce original scores, utilizing the department’s composition studio.
  4. Prestigious Faculty Music faculty have impressive resumes, including working as assistant director and concertmaster of the New England Symphonic Ensemble and music director of the Napa Valley Symphony; and have toured Europe, the Middle East, South Africa, China, Southeast Asia, the United States, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and performed in famous places like Carnegie Hall.
  5. Scholarships Available The $1,000 renewable Campus Impact Scholarship is for students participating in PUC orchestra, wind ensemble, iCantori, or Octet.

What You Can Do With This Major

While many graduates with music degrees work in the creative industry, they are by no means limited to that arena. There are many career paths you might be interested in.

  • Church music director
  • Conductor
  • Copyright administrator
  • Finance
  • Healthcare
  • Music librarian
  • Music producer
  • Music therapist
  • Music video producer
  • Solo/Symphonic performance
  • Sound technician
  • Teaching

Learn more about the department of music at puc.edu/academics. Our team of admissions counselors can answer any questions you have about PUC’s music programs, or the other majors the college offers. Call (800) 862-7080, option 2 or email admissions@puc.edu to get connected with a counselor now and start learning about all the options available to you!

Nature Photography Day is for the Trees!

Nature Photography Day was this past weekend, June 15th! The North American Nature Photography Association (NANPA) created this day in 2006 as a way to encourage people to learn and enjoy capturing the beauty of nature through their cameras. One of the best things about attending PUC is being surrounded by incredible natural beauty. From the coast to the mountains, there’s so much to see and photograph while you’re here. So let’s take a look at some of our favorite #PUCAdventures.

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Gonna miss foggy mornings in the valley 🌫

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#SecondFavoriteTree

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To see more beautiful photos of life at the College on the Mountain, follow us on Instagram at @PUCNow.

A PUC Summer Checklist for Parents

Happy summer! We know the summer months can fill up quickly with work, planned vacations, and other unexpected things, and it can be difficult to keep track of what your student needs to take care of to be ready at PUC this fall.

Below is a helpful checklist you can refer back to over the next few months for what you and your student can be working on to help make their transition to PUC as smooth as possible.

Ready to get started? Let’s do this!

  1. Pay the $200 enrollment fee. This is required before your student registers for classes with an academic advisor. Pay the fee at puc.edu/reserve.
  2. Register for classes. Once the enrollment fee has been paid, your student will be contacted by an academic advisor to start planning out their class schedule and then register for classes.
  3. Submit the housing form. The sooner the enrollment fee is paid, the higher up on the housing list your student will be to receive their dorm assignment! Fill the form out at puc.edu/housingform.
  4. Make financial aid arrangements. Confirm your student is all set for fall quarter with your family’s PUC financial counselor and submit additional paperwork if needed. Call (800) 862-7080, option 1, or email studentfinance@puc.edu to get connected with a counselor.
    1. Submit the FAFSA. This isn’t required but is highly recommended, as FAFSA determines your student’s financial aid eligibility. Use PUC’s school code to have their information sent to us—it’s 001258.
  5. Submit the required health forms. Make an appointment with your student’s primary health provider and fill out the Health Information Form. Immunization records will also need to be submitted. Have questions? Contact Health Services for more information by calling (707) 965-6339 or emailing healthservices@puc.edu.
  6. BONUS: Get ready for move-in day! Help your student get ready to move into their dorm room and start buying the necessary supplies now. Read “Get the Answers to Your Residential Life Questions” on our blog for a packing list and other helpful items.  

For more information about these steps, and to download the forms mentioned above, visit puc.edu/alreadyaccepted. You can also check in with your student’s admissions counselor to see what’s left for them to submit. Call (800) 862-7080, option 2, or email admissions@puc.edu to get connected with a counselor. You can also live chat with an admissions representative through our online chat service, available on our website during standard business hours (Pacific Standard Time).

We can’t wait to see your family at New Student Orientation on September 18!

Your PUC Summer Checklist, Part I

During the long summer months before New Student Orientation in far-off September, there’s still plenty to do if you’re an accepted student. Of course, we also hope you have plenty of fun during your break from school too!

When you’re ready to get things done on your accepted student checklist, here are the most important things you can work on to be ready for PUC this fall:

  1. Pay your enrollment fee & fill out a housing form. Start here! You will need to pay a $200 enrollment fee before registering for classes, as well as submit a housing form. You can do both at puc.edu/reserve.
  2. Apply for PUC scholarships. If you haven’t already, check out what scholarships PUC offers. There’s still plenty of time to write those essays! See a full list of PUC scholarships at puc.edu/scholarships.
  3. Make financial arrangements. Your financial counselor will help build a financial aid package that meets your family’s need and fits your budget. If you haven’t already, submit your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which is used to help determine your aid eligibility. Get started at fafsa.gov.
  4. Register for classes. You will work with an academic advisor to come up with your perfect (or relatively close to perfect!) class schedule. This advisor will be in the department you’re planning to study in, so they’ll know the ins and outs of your program. Feel free to ask lots of questions!
  5. Submit your health forms. Turning in your health forms before you get to campus will only make your future life easier. Find the forms at puc.edu/healthservices.

Note: If you have 10 minutes, you can use PUC’s net price calculator to get a preliminary estimate of how much aid you may qualify for while you wait to talk with your financial counselor. Visit puc.edu/npc to use the calculator now.

If you have any questions while working on these items, don’t hesitate to reach out to the Admissions office by email at admissions@puc.edu or through our 800 number at (800) 862-7080, option 2. Our team of counselors is happy to help guide you through the process of getting ready for school in the fall!

A Conversation with Bethany, PUC’s Campus Chronicle Editor

By Becky St. Clair

Bethany greets everyone who enters her office with a warm smile and an enthusiastic handshake, immediately establishing herself as a confident, approachable professional. You may never guess she was only a freshman when she was elected to the position.

Many characteristics set Bethany apart from other students, not the least of which are her thoughtful eloquence, competent leadership, and gracious demeanor. One of the few non-seniors to serve as the editor-in-chief for the Campus Chronicle, Bethany filled her role with gusto and poise, framing a vision and skillfully guiding her team as they made that vision reality. Here, Bethany reflects with us on her year serving PUC as its lead student communicator.

What inspired you to pursue being the CC editor?

Since 2015, I’ve intentionally taken a yearly risk or challenge to learn a new skill, travel somewhere new, or understand a subject. So, selfishly, I had so many ideas and plans for what the CC could become it was impossible to resist the challenge.

What did you find most rewarding about your CC work?

It is incredibly rewarding to see writers hone their craft, learn to edit and critique their work, and publish articles with which the campus resonates. It’s a really special thing for the CC to be the platform from which to affirm students’ hard work and accomplishments. As a campus, we’re stronger when we support each other, I believe, and I love that the CC can be a part of that process.

You’ve talked about growing your team and your vision for building the CC; tell us about your own personal growth as editor.

I’m a very evidence-based person and I like to know something is certain. Being editor is very uncertain. Last-minute things happen, budget changes, writers drop out, deadlines are missed. Having faith that things are possible even through uncertainty makes it possible to achieve a desirable outcome.

I have also gained a sense of self-assurance in this job. Being pushed to do something foreign and difficult shows me what I’m capable of doing, and I see my team members experiencing this as well.

Who is someone who has had a major impact on your leadership?

Professor Lynne Thew, as the CC faculty advisor, is a stickler for details and holds herself and our editorial team to a very high standard. Through example and mentoring, she’s taught me that a leader sets vision but also steps into the nitty-gritty process of seeing that vision through. I’m deeply indebted to her, both as a friend and role model.

What are some things you’d list under “accomplishments” as editor?

  • Growth of editorial team: from 5-10 members to 20-25 members
  • Consistent schedule this year: 12 issues
  • Competitive in the David L. Apple Awards
  • Transitioned to traditional newspaper format
  • The majority of stories published are on-campus news
  • Recognized by faculty in Letters to the Editor
  • Increased social media recognition on campus
  • Increase in both alumni and on-campus donor support

In what ways would you say this position gave you confidence and strength as a person and a leader?

It’s not easy to take on opportunities that look too enormous to manage, but as a result, I have a greater dignity in and understanding of my capabilities, as well as a greater measure of self-respect. So, as a female leader, I’ve also felt more empowered to inhabit a space of leadership without feeling like an imposter.

This experience also taught me the power of a hard-working team. We have incredibly talented students from many departments working on the CC, and as a leader I recognize now that our strength lies in unity and common vision.

Why do you think it is important to allow student voices to be heard—even when those voices may be challenging the status quo and making some people uncomfortable?

Freedom of speech is an incredible privilege Western journalism has had a right to for some time. In the age of “fake news” and constant ideological propaganda, I think it is important for students to develop an ability to think critically, compose an evidence-based argument, and approach an issue from a valid angle. Proverbs says, “in a multitude of counselors lies wisdom.” I like to think that a variety of opinions, albeit sometimes uncomfortable ones, helps us collectively to arrive at a measure of truth.

What advice would you give someone going into a leadership position for the first time?

Stay humble. Leadership is not a status symbol but a call to serve. You’re there to make your team shine and call out their potential to accomplish a worthy goal. Admit your mistakes, seek advice from trusted mentors, and don’t recklessly dismiss their wisdom for the sake of novel theory. Also, be kind and love your team. If you care about your team members beyond what they can do for the team, that’s the definition of love.

We’ve come a long way in the last couple of decades toward gender equality in the workplace, but there are still some challenges women in leadership positions face. Which challenges do you think are the most crucial to address?

It is crucial to address the imposter syndrome many women feel in positions of leadership—myself included. Especially if women come from a religio-social conservative background, they feel their position of leadership is not valid, is not recognized by their spiritual community, or is tangential to their expected social role. It will be a continuous challenge for women to boldly inhabit their space of leadership, and serve their team with poise.

Academic Spotlight: Chemistry

PUC’s department of chemistry is known for students receiving high MFT (Major Field Test) and ACS (American Chemical Society) standardized exams and offering incredible research opportunities, year after year. Students are well prepared to go into a variety of fields, including those in medical, dental, pharmacy; as well as graduate and other M.D./Ph.D programs.

Programs offered:

  • B.A., B.S. in Chemistry
  • B.S. in Biochemistry

Special Recognition

In 2017, students voted and selected Dr. Kent Davis for the prestigious annual Educator of the Year award. Davis has taught at the college since 2002 and serves as a professor of chemistry, and is one of the college’s beloved professors, as is evident by this award.

Check out our Q&A with Dr. Davis on the Admissions blog to get to know him a little more!

Fast Facts

  1. The department provides courses suitable for pre-professional curricula including pre-medicine, pre-dentistry, pre-dental hygiene, pre-nursing, allied health, and more.
  2. More than 30 students are employed in the department of chemistry each year as lab instructors, stockroom assistants, readers, computer specialists, and tutors, helping students gain valuable real-life skills they can apply to future careers.
  3. Science Presentations And Research for Kids, or SPARK, is a program that connects PUC students with local elementary, middle, and high school students under the umbrella of science. The idea is to send small groups of PUC students into schools to give age-appropriate demonstrations and explanations of various aspects of science. SPARK is supported and sponsored by professor Aimee Wyrick, chair of the department of biology, and Dr. Kent Davis, chair of the department of chemistry, who help the students coordinate with local schools and oversee the demonstrations provided.
  4. The chemistry department’s state-of-the-art microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometer (MPAES) can measure the amount of over 60 elements in many types of samples and is sensitive enough to detect one part in a billion. And unlike most schools, you can use this machine in labs yourself—no waiting around for a TA to do it.

What You Can Do With This Major

Chemistry is a popular choice among students looking to go into the medical field but it also offers career paths in research and many other areas.

  • Dentistry
  • Environmental chemist
  • Forensic chemist
  • Medicine
  • Patent lawyer
  • Pharmacist
  • Quality control chemist
  • Research chemist
  • Scientific information services
  • Teacher
  • Veterinarian

Learn more about the department of chemistry at puc.edu/academics. Our team of admissions counselors can answer any questions you have about PUC’s chemistry programs, or the other majors the college offers. Call (800) 862-7080, option 2 or email admissions@puc.edu to get connected with a counselor now and start learning about all the options available to you!