Monthly Archives: February 2020

Creative Outlets: An Interview With Student Musician Alexis Keller

Becky St. Clair

Hailing from Loomis, California (near Sacramento), Alexis Keller is a nursing major in her junior year who also happens to be both a fabulous violinist and a successful competitive water-skier. Not only is she a first violinist in the PUC Orchestra, but she plays second violin in the college’s string quartet as well. 

Alexis was gracious enough to share her passion and insights with us so we could share them with you. Without further ado, meet Alexis!

When did you start playing the violin?

I started playing the violin when I was three years old. Interestingly enough, the school I went to at the time required everyone to learn how to play the violin. After the violin teacher left the school, my mom, who is also a violinist, continued to practice with me at home and took me to private violin lessons.

What kept you interested in that particular instrument?

I have continued to be interested in and play the violin because I love the medium of emotional expression it creates, the ability to connect with others through the language of music, and the opportunity to worship God through music. Also, in my unbiased opinion, the violin is one of the most beautiful-sounding instruments and truly emulates the human voice.

Because of my experiences playing the violin, I have had opportunities to connect with lifelong friends, perform famous orchestra pieces, and play in performances around the world.

Aside from learning the violin, tell us about your experience with music as a young person.

Music was a big part of my life growing up. From as early on as I can remember, I was brought along to my mom’s orchestra dress rehearsals and concerts. I grew up listening to the orchestral works of Beethoven, Dvořák, Mahler, and Haydn (to name a few), both at my mom’s orchestra concerts and on the radio station when my parents drove me home from school. At the age of seven, I joined the Sacramento Youth Symphony and continued to perform in the orchestra for the next decade until I graduated high school at age 17.

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What makes music valuable to you here at PUC?

I am very grateful for the opportunity to continue making music at PUC because I am surrounded by a community of like-minded students and professors who share the same appreciation for music and passion to share that love of music with others. The environment PUC’s department of music has created pushes me to become a better musician and provides a creative outlet for a much-needed break from my studies!

What is your favorite piece of music you’ve ever performed, and why?

Definitely Accolay’s Concerto No. 1 in A Minor. This piece holds a special place in my heart because it was my first time soloing with an orchestra. It was a really great experience to go through the process of working with the orchestra and conductor to create the performance and then share that with my family and friends.

 How do you balance study and music?

Finding time to practice can be very difficult, which is one of the reasons I am so thankful to be in orchestra and quartet. Without these scheduled times, I am not sure I would so frequently play my violin. The best way to balance my busy schedule is to remind myself how important it is to take time for myself and what I love to do, like making music.

Okay, so heading a completely different direction, tell us about your other, non-musical hobby.

Competitive slalom waterskiing is definitely a less conventional sport, but one I absolutely love doing. I started skiing and competing around the age of seven after much convincing from my mom to enter a tournament. After that first tournament, I was hooked. I loved competing against both my personal score as well as the other girls in my division and the constant challenge to complete the next pass as the rope was shortened. I have won many local tournaments and received medals when I traveled throughout the U.S. for regional competitions.

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What’s one class here at PUC in which you feel you’ve learned the most?

My nursing classes definitely feel like information overload a lot of the time, but they have all taught me so much. My favorite nursing class that I’ve taken was Nursing 4. It was a transition phase from the first year of nursing school to the second. I felt this class really helped me grow my critical thinking skills and prioritization of patient care.

What is something you want to accomplish before graduating?

I hope to make a positive impact on the PUC campus in a way that emulates God’s love. Additionally, my goal is to start working as a nurse while I get my BSN next year.

What is something you’ve already accomplished?

I am proud of getting into the nursing program, my work as a coordinator for the collegiate Sabbath school, and my opportunities to connect with students as an RA. I am glad to be involved in campus life because it has taught me skills of leadership, teamwork, and communication I will continue to develop after graduation and into adulthood.

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What is your career goal, and why?

I want to get my nurse practitioner license. I chose nursing as a career path because I was drawn to the interactions with patients, the opportunity to better the physical and lifestyle health of individuals, and to be in a setting where I am constantly learning new things.

Okay, final and clearly most important question: Tra Vigne or Villa Corona?

I prefer Tra Vigne over Villa Corona. Though Tra Vigne is more expensive, it has a lot of vegan options such as the make your own pizza, Beyond Burger, and piadinas. 

 

 

 

You CAN Afford An Adventist Education

If you’re a high school senior you’re probably starting to get excited about graduation. That might lead you toward thinking about college next year and you might start to get nervous about how to afford it. College is expensive. But here are three ways to make it possible.

Step 1: Apply for FAFSA

One of the most important things you can do to prepare for college is to file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA is an online form you will submit each year that determines your eligibility for student financial aid. Be sure to file FAFSA as soon as possible since some aid is awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. To have your FAFSA information sent to PUC, include PUC’s school code—it’s 001258. Apply for FAFSA at fafsa.gov

Step 2: Apply for Cal Grant

Cal Grant is a financial aid program administered by the California Student Aid Commission that provides aid to California undergraduates, vocational training students, and those in teacher certification programs and can be used at most colleges in California. If you’re planning on attending a private non-profit California college like PUC, Cal Grant is worth up to $9,084 per year. That’s over $36,000 to help pay for four years of college—and it’s free!

To be considered for a 2020-21 Cal Grant award, you must complete the following requirements by March 2nd:

  1. Submit a 2020-21 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) or California Dream Act Application (CADAA)
  2. Ensure that a certified GPA is submitted to the California Student Aid Commission 

 Not from California? That’s ok! We have a different step 2 for you! 

 Step 2: Apply for PUC’s Out of state Scholarship ($1,500-$4,000)

To reward students who choose to adventure outside of their home state, PUC presents the Out-of-State Scholarship. A student whose residential address is outside of California will receive an automatic award of $1,500. Requirements and qualifications: 

  1. Have residency in a state outside of California
  2. For students who meet the qualifications for a Cal Grant and would receive one if they were a state resident, up to $4,000 may be awarded 

Find out more about this scholarship and more by visiting our website.

Step 3. Apply to PUC Promise

PUC is excited to be partnering with Ardeo Education Solutions to offer the first-ever Loan Repayment Assistance Program. LRAP is a financial safety-net we offer at no cost to you or your family. If your income after graduation is under $45,000, we can help you pay back your federal, private, and parent plus loans. This is just for new students coming in Fall 2020. 

If you’re interested in learning more about PUC Promise or if you want to register, visit our website!

BONUS STEP: Look for outside scholarships! There are tons out there, you just have to search and apply. Here are a few options we found so you don’t have to! Check out our outside scholarship blog post.

 

 

Faces of PUC: Graeme McKelvie

Fun fact about Graeme McKelvie, his real name is Kenneth and he has a brother also named Kenneth which might be confusing so he goes by Graeme (pronounced Gray). Graeme is one of PUC’s student ambassadors which means not only does he love PUC, but he loves to show visitors around campus. It also means he has to know a lot about the college so feel free to ask him tons of questions next time you see him, (don’t do this, he’ll be mad at us!) When Graeme is not busy giving campus tours and loving PUC, he’s working towards his B.S. in management for medical professionals.

What is your dream job?

My dream job is to become a pediatrician. When I was young, I was always interested in different fields of medicine, particularly veterinary and physical therapy. It wasn’t until my senior year of high school that I changed my mind and settled on becoming a pediatrician. 

What is your favorite thing about being a part of the Pioneers family?

My favorite thing about being a part of the pioneers family is the sense of community that’s always present. People are always so friendly, even if it’s just a nod or a smile, you never really feel alone.

Where is your favorite place in the world?

My favorite places in the world are the white sand beaches of Pagudpud, Philippines and Tokyo, Japan.

What show are you binge-watching right now?

A couple shows that I am currently bingeing are ‘The Rain’ on Netflix and ‘Fresh Off the Boat’.

What is something you’re passionate about?

Something I am passionate about is my path towards my desired career. I am really trying to accomplish my goals and set up a life for myself and family that I can be proud of. 

Recommend a place in the Bay Area to visit on a weekend.

A place in the Bay Area I recommend visiting is Japantown in San Francisco because there is a lot of good restaurants and dessert cafes there which are always nice to enjoy. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residential Life 101

There are tons of exciting and new things about going off to college. One of those is moving into a residential hall. Unless you went to a boarding academy (if you did you are pros already) this is likely your first time living ‘on your own’. You might be very excited about this or you might have a lot of anxiety surrounding the idea. Either way, you’re bound to have questions. Lucky for you, we have the answers! 

First of all, let’s cover how you even get a room assigned to you. It’s actually fairly simple because we’ll do it for you! Once you’re accepted, you’ll be asked to pay a $200 deposit and fill out a housing reservation form. This lets us know of your plans. Since rooms are assigned in the order they are received, it’s a good idea to do this ASAP! Room assignments are sent out in the summer. Something for you to look forward to. 

Now that we have that covered, what should you plan to bring with you? Each residence hall room contains two beds, dresser drawers, closets, desks and chairs, and one sink with a mirror. However, figuring out what else you’ll need to pack and bring to college can be difficult so to make it easier we came up with a packing list to help. Read our “Your College Packing List” post for ideas about what you probably should bring with you for your move up to PUC

Just because you’re not living at home with your family doesn’t mean you’re completely on your own. Each residence hall has a dean who lives in the building. They have a team of RAs or residence assistants, who work with them to ensure each student within their dorm is having the best experience possible. Their goal is for each student to feel like they’re part of the special Pioneers family. 

We asked RA, Alexis Keller to answer a few commonly asked questions about life in the PUC residential halls. 

What is an RA, what is your role?

An RA is a student leader in the dorms. We are there to provide educational, social, and spiritual opportunities for the residents! RA’s will do nightly “room checks,” stopping by each room to check-in and see how you’re doing. RA’s are also there to lend an ear (with confidentiality) if you want to talk about a rough day you had, a bad breakup, or if you need a shoulder to cry on, or just simply need to vent. Our rooms are always open if residents need a place to discuss any issues they are having, or just want to chill. Overall, RA’s are here to enhance your dorm life by being a resource for residents who have any questions/concerns, maintain a safe environment, create meaningful worship events, and plan fun social activities.

Will I have a curfew?

Yes, the curfew is 11 p.m. every night except for Saturday, where curfew is 12 midnight. This does not mean you have to be in your room, but simply in the building. Often residents will still be up in the various study areas of the dorm past curfew. There is also an extension to this curfew, which will be explained more during your orientation!

What social opportunities will I have in the residential hall?

There are many social opportunities in each residence hall! We typically do a big social event once a month, such as movie nights, pizza parties, pancake breakfasts, dorm Olympics, etc. Smaller social events will also happen on your own floor. Anything from a movie night, game night, tea time, and lots of others! Along with attending these social activities, you can put your own creative ideas to good use by working with your RA’s to come up with events that you would like to see happen in your dorm.

What spiritual opportunities?

Each residential hall has all-dorm worship that happens once a week with food, activities, music, and worship thought. Additionally, RA’s will have individual floor worship once a week where students can stop by for a quick snack and devotion. Along with the weekly scheduled worships, RA’s are available for one-on-one Bible studies with the residents. Even when we are not with our residents, we are always praying for them and their success!

What is one of the more challenging things about living in a residential hall and what are some ways you deal with it?

One of the more challenging aspects of living in a residential hall is learning how to live with another person in your space. Having a roommate or suitemate that is messy, has a different sleep schedule, different music tastes, or different living habits can be frustrating. It is important to always be communicative with your roommate as well as be willing to meet them halfway! College is a wonderful growing experience and these challenges can help you grow a closer connection with your roommate when handled correctly. You can always come to your RA’s to discuss any roommate disagreements and to talk about solutions and alternatives to make your living experience more comfortable and enjoyable.

What’s your favorite thing about living in the residential hall?

One of my favorite things about living in the residential hall is the sense of community. Through the various social and worship events, I get to know most of the residents in a more relaxed setting separate from the stress of school. Because we all live together, it is nice to be able to pop over to a friend’s room to hang out as well as to meet up with students within your major for study sessions.

 

How To Make The Most Of Class Time 

Sometimes the idea of sitting still and paying attention is too much to bear. I get it, really. With late nights and early mornings you’re probably tired, your classroom is warm, the idea of dozing off might seem very appealing. The thing is, you’re paying good money to be here so fight the urge to daydream your class away; get your money’s worth by making the most of your class time. Here are four simple ways to do just that. 

Be Engaged

Get into the habit of being attentive during class. Some classes are easier to pay attention to than others. A one or two-hour lecture might be more difficult than a class that requires your participation and interaction, so find something to help you stay engaged even if it’s something silly such as keeping track of how many times your professor uses a certain word or phrase. 

Take Notes 

Taking notes during class is also a great way to stay engaged during a lecture. Not only are you forcing yourself to stay engaged, but you’re also helping yourself by writing down things you’ll want to remember later. For some people, the act of physically writing things down even helps them retain that information. 

Ask Questions 

If you don’t understand something, ask. Your professors will always be happy to answer questions if you have them, even if you just need a little clarification. Not only does asking questions give you the answer you need, but it also shows your professor you’re engaged and care about their course. If you’re shy and don’t want to speak up in class, take advantage of office hours. 

Ditch the Phone

Did you know the average American checks their phone on average once every 12 minutes? If you’re sitting in class and you’re bored or having a hard time paying attention the urge to check your phone only multiples. That’s why we recommend ditching the phone altogether. Put it in your bag for the duration of class to cut the temptation. Also, it shows your professors you respect the work they put into their lectures. 

Even on the days you don’t feel 100 percent focused, make the most of your class time. Each lecture will be useful when it comes time to complete your homework or to study for quizzes and exams. Stay awake, stay focused, and make the most of your class time. If you find you’re struggling a bit with your coursework, check out some great resources PUC offers! 

 

15 Outside Scholarships To Apply For 

When you look at the cost for college, it’s important to keep in mind 100 percent of PUC students receive one or more forms of financial aid. In fact, we’ve awarded over $30 million dollars in financial aid to our students. However, even with all the scholarships PUC offers (which we encourage you to look at right now!), it’s still expensive. That’s why it’s important to look elsewhere for financial help. 

There are countless outside scholarship opportunities you can find online. Some of them are serious and require essays to be written while others are fun and ask for a video or project. The process to find those scholarships can be a little time-consuming, but don’t let that stop you from receiving free money. If you don’t know where to start looking for scholarships, here are 15 you can apply for.  

All About Education Scholarship 

Deadline: April 30, 2020 

Award: $3,000

Every student dreams of receiving free money for their college tuition. All this scholarship requires is an essay of 250 words or less about how a $3,000 scholarship for education will make a difference in your life. 

3rd Annual Litner + Deganian College Scholarship Program 

Deadline: March 31, 2020, at 9 a.m. EST. 

Award: $2,500

Litner + Deganian is looking for a creative-minded student to create a superhero focused on reducing car accidents and accident-related deaths among teens to be the mascot of their company.

Dr Pepper Tuition Giveaway 

Deadline: Re-opens mid-August 2020 

Award: $100,000 

Dr Pepper is awarding over $1,000,000 to help students reach their biggest goals. You must be 18-24 and attending school for the 2020-2021 year. You will need to submit a video talking about your academic and professional goals and how winning this tuition will impact your life. This giveaway does not open until mid-August, so you have time to be creative, show how passionate you are and give them a sense of who you are. 

Superpower Scholarship 

Deadline: March 31, 2020 

Award: $2,500

If you are a hero or villain enthusiast, this super scholarship can give you the power to win free college money. In 250 words or less, write about a superhero or villain you would want to change places with for a day and why. 

ResumeCompanion Annual Scholarship 

Deadline: July 15, 2020 

Award: $1,000

This fun award lets you create a resume based on the life of any fictional or nonfictional character, from TV, history, literature, or myth. The resume should not be about yourself or your own experiences. Resumes should be no longer than two pages and there is not a required GPA. 

Flavor of the Month Scholarship 

Deadline: July 31, 2020 

Award: $1,500

Everybody loves ice cream, so why not write about what flavor of ice cream you would be and why for $1,500! 

Fifth Month Scholarship 

Deadline: May 31, 2020 

Award: $1,500

This unique scholarship wants to know what is so special about five. In 250 words or less, write a letter to the number five explaining why five is important. You can either be serious or funny. 

2020 General Marketing Education Scholarship – Marketing Education 

Deadline: December 15, 2020 

Award: $1,000 

This scholarship requires you to submit a 1,000-word minimum essay about your educational goals and plans after graduation. You will also need to explain why you deserve to win this scholarship and what it would mean to you if you won. 

ServiceScape Scholarship 2020 

Deadline: November 29, 2020 

Award: $1,000 

To apply for this scholarship, ServiceScape wants students to write a 300-word essay on the topic of: How does writing impact today’s world? You also need to submit a headshot with your essay. 

Halloween Costume Scholarship 

Deadline: October 31, 2020 

Award: $1,000

The cost of college is pretty scary, but the thought of free money is far from spooky. All you have to do for this scholarship is write about your favorite costume worn by either you or your pet. 

Do-Over Scholarship 

Deadline: June 30, 2020 

Award: $1,500

In 250 words or less, you will need to write about a mistake you made and if you were allowed one do-over in life, what would it be and why? Don’t make the mistake of missing out on this scholarship.

GoSkills Scholarship 

Deadline: March 15, 2020 

Award: $2,000

If you are a female college student who wants to start your own online business, this scholarship is for you. Besides talking about yourself, you will need to share reasons why you’re scared of starting your business, what’s holding you back, and who your female boss role model is and why. This isn’t an essay, but more of a conversation. 

Build U. Scholarship 

Deadline: April 15, 2020 

Award: $2,500 Scholarship Each Semester 

If you are majoring in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM), this scholarship is for you. In less than 1,000 words, explain why you admire a company or organization that best exemplifies core values. You will also need to submit a short video answering the question: “What would the Build U. Scholarship mean for your education?” 

The Blades of Green Scholarship Fund 

Deadline: March 27, 2020 

Award: $1,000

If you are seeking environmental studies or related fields, this scholarship is for you. This scholarship is based on your academic excellence, the pursuit of further study in environmental education, and passion for further study. In 350-500 words, describe your career plans after graduation, passion for your intended field, and what inspired you to choose your career path. This application must be submitted by mail. 

University Frames Scholarship Program 

Deadline: June 15, 2020 

Award: $1,000

This scholarship is only for 3rd-year undergrad students who have a GPA of at least 3.0. You must write a 400-500 word essay describing your future goals after you graduate and what important lessons you have learned in school and how you will apply them in your future goals. You will also need to send a photo or selfie holding an invisible diploma frame. 

Don’t miss the opportunity of receiving free money for your education. There’s money out there just waiting to be given, all you need to do is look!

 

 

Prayer In Numbers

College is all about students learning and growing both personally and professionally. However, here at PUC, we care about your spiritual growth as well. One of the beautiful things about getting your education at our beloved College on the Mountain is the MANY different ways people worship. 

There are a variety of options on campus which is great since everyone is at a different place in their spiritual walk. If the typical Church service doesn’t sound appealing to you, try attending Friday night vespers, dorm worship, or the student-led Church called The Twelve. Not interested in staying inside? Take to the trails and worship God in nature. 

Still not sure these are for you? Start something new! Students are encouraged to take an active role in their spiritual journey. It’s always inspiring to watch young people develop their relationship with God but it’s even better to see students from different backgrounds and religions come together to support each other as they grow closer in Christ. 

Last year, Isaac Peterson, Dylan Gray, Jesse Zachawerus, Noah Ofisa, and Drew Biswas organically started their own prayer group. During their weekly study session, one of the five decided they should go around and convey what was in their hearts. After stories were shared, they decided to pray for each other and at that moment, what began as a small study group helping each other conquer the Greek language, turned into a weekly prayer group dubbed the ‘brotherhood of prayer’. As the group got closer they began to invite more people and the little prayer group expanded to accommodate an average of 50 people (yes, women are welcome in the brotherhood)!

This group consists of people from different upbringings and faiths who focus on genuinely connecting with, not preaching at, people. They strive to love, care, accept, and support each member as they share their journey. “I needed this. I didn’t go to an Adventist school growing up,” says Drew Biswas. “Knowing I have this community is everything to me. It’s not a group that’s just praying for each other, but a family of nonjudgmental people. It’s permanently changed me”.

If you’re interested in learning more about spiritual life on campus visit the Missions & Chaplain Services page on our website! 

 

 

 

Faces of PUC: Judith Mendoza

Meet PUC’s newest admissions counselor, Judith Mendoza. After graduating from PUC, Judith continued her education at Andrews University where she received her MA in youth and young adult ministry. Judith has a passion for Adventist Education and was excited to accept a position that would bring her back to our beloved tree-covered mountain. 

What brought you to PUC? How/Why did you decide to work here?

I first came to PUC as a student in 2011 and it was the trees and community feel that drew me to PUC. Thankfully that decision led to some of my favorite memories and people. After graduation, I felt a call to ministry and headed to Andrews to get an MA in Youth and Young Adult ministry. As I was approaching the end of my time at Andrews, my friend Angel (another Admission Counselor) told me about an opening here in admissions. While it may seem like I diverted from ministry, I find there are so many opportunities where I get to share my two biggest passions, Jesus and Adventist Education. Connect Ministries allows me to share in worship experiences with our youth in local churches and schools, while college fairs will let me share with others PUC and the things that make this place and our education system so special. I’m very happy to be back.

What is something you can do that might surprise people?

I am an amateur ‘master juggler’ in balls and rings, I got close to mastering the hollow bowling pins but I still need some practice. I’m also a decent goalkeeper and love participating in PUC’s soccer intramurals. Look out for my team, ‘Lakers’ (I did not pick the name-Go Portland Trailblazers!), this season.

Where is your favorite place to eat in the Napa Valley and why?

I love going to Melted, I have always been a fan of comfort food and grilled cheese always hits the spot. I also feel a little fancy there because it’s not your regular grilled cheese but like an upscale version of it.

What is your favorite thing about being part of the Pioneers family?

In the transition from a student to a staff member here at PUC, I’m happy to see I still get to experience the warm community feel which first drew me in. I was already friends with most of the other admission counselors, but the rest have been so welcoming and encouraging as I learn the ropes. Not just the team but other faculty and staff members have also made me feel like a family member who’s finally home from a trip. In a way I feel like that too, PUC was home for me for four years and while a lot has changed, the people are as friendly and this campus is as beautiful as I remember.

What is one song you’re listening to on repeat lately?

If you look at my Spotify account it’s all over the place, there’s an Anthems playlist, a Spanish playlist, an English playlist, and I also have a Disney Channel playlist. I don’t think I can narrow it down to one song, but according to Spotify it’s Hesitate by the Jonas Brothers.

Finish this sentence: On Sunday mornings you can find me…

Reading. I love reading for pleasure and since I’m no longer reading textbooks every day, I’m taking advantage and getting back into it. You may also find me at brunch, Sunday morning brunch is a big thing in my family and I’d love to continue that with my cousins and brother who are here in Angwin.

 

Those Winter Quarter Blues

Ally Romanes

Even here in sunny California, the winter months can feel neverending. With less daylight and cooler temperatures (yes it does get cold in CA). It can be really hard to focus and feel productive when all you want to do is curl up in a blanket and watch Netflix. Here are some ways to help you deal with those winter quarter blues and stay on top of what’s important.

Make A Plan

Figure out what absolutely must get done. Make a list and take it one step at a time. Make sure to note important things like due dates for assignments and tests. Having a game plan will help keep you on task.

Study Productively 

Lack of motivation can really put you in a slump. If you’re reading the same page over and over again, think of other ways to use your study time productively. Create a study guide or study your notes, or quiz yourself on what you’ve been reading. There’s never enough time to finish everything, so make sure you’re using your time wisely. 

Sleep! 

You can’t work productively if you don’t get enough sleep. If you’re constantly feeling tired and not as engaged, try actually going to bed! Choose a bedtime and try and stick to it throughout the week. We know stuff comes up and sometimes you’re not going to be able to get to sleep on time, so plan for a short nap.

Take Breaks

Being on the go is exhausting, so remember to take breaks. Grab dinner with friends, hit the gym with your roommate, watch your favorite show, whatever you choose to do, just be sure to take a little time to relax. 

 Do Something Fun On The Weekends 

Get off the hill during the weekends! Doing things you enjoy will help clear your mind and leave you in a better mood. Get something to eat, catch a movie, or go biking in the back 40. Take advantage of your weekends and recuperate a little.

Take Care Of Yourself

Balancing work, school, friends, and family can take a lot out of you and leave you feeling overwhelmed. Make sure to take care of yourself both physically and mentally. 

You’re important to us! If you’re having a hard time, make sure to ask for help. Reach out to a friend, RA, professor, dean, or chaplain. There are countless people on campus ready to jump in to offer solutions or just a shoulder to lean on. 

 

Faces of PUC: Gregg Gallemore

Meet Gregg Gallemore. Last year, Gregg decided to move back to his alma mater and take a welding job with facilities management. He recently got married and is he’s really enjoying being back in an area he loves, building a home with his new wife. 

What brought you to PUC? How/Why did you decide to work here?

This is kind of a long story, but essentially, I know I am here at PUC because God wants me here. I know it’s a little cliche sounding, but it is the most blatant answer I can give when I ask myself that same question. When I reflect on the whole story of how I came to work here, everything was too perfectly timed out and in my mind, that isn’t how life typically works. Every time I pray, I ask God to give me blatantly in my face answers, ” God, either shut me down hard or kick my butt through the door but I want/need an answer.” PUC was a kick through the door. Every time I ask God to give me a blatant answer, there it is right in my face.

What is the best thing about being a part of the Pioneers family?

I’ll say working with the facilities team is probably the best thing about working here. I love working with these guys and sincerely appreciate the work they do. They make working here easy, even when I have to crawl into the stinky dirty trash truck to weld something!

Where is your favorite place to eat in the Valley and why?

Tra Vigne is always good. Eat inside or outside, both offer a really nice environment or “AMBIANCE” if you want me to get all fancy with my words.

What is something you can do/want to do that might be surprising for people to learn?

I love metalwork, so much so that I built a huge wedding arbor for one of my childhood friends. I also built my wedding arbor as well. Because my craft is working with metal, these aren’t simple arbors, they are all made out of steel with intricate metal details. Aside from that, I ride a motorcycle and sometimes I do wheelies on that motorcycle. 

What is one song you’re listening to on repeat lately?

Songs? … try albums. I know these aren’t the best album’s to admit to listening to on repeat, but Tool’s new album Fear Inoculum and Stick Figure’s new album World on Fire.

Who is someone you admire and why?

I admire my dad. He just has so much more patience than I do and that is just one of the many qualities I admire about him. He’s also a really good man that I strive to be like.

Finish this sentence: On Sunday mornings you can find me … 

On Sunday morning’s you can find me sleeping in till 7 or 8 am!, working on cleaning up my place, walking my dog Amica, and then working on whatever project I’ve got going.