Monthly Archives: November 2019

There’s No Wrong Way to Worship

One of the benefits of attending PUC is being a part of our community of faith and learning. Our campus is comprised of caring faculty and staff who give students the support they need on their spiritual walk with Christ, through a multitude of opportunities.

PUC offers weekly vespers and church services for those who enjoy a more traditional fellowshiping. There are also dorm worships, small group Bible studies, and various student-lead ministries running throughout the week and open to everyone on campus. If that’s not for you, PUC is in a prime location for communing with God in nature. From the back 40 trails to breezy beaches, the destinations are endless and inspiring. Prefer to serve? Not only does PUC offer multiple short term mission trips but weekly opportunities to give back to the community. 

However you prefer to worship, PUC makes it easy because we feel, there is no wrong way to worship! 

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The Twelve offers a personalized, student-focused Sabbath worship. “Our goal is to develop an open spirit-driven community that reflects the life and teaching of Jesus through discipleship.” — Leah Dopp, 2017-2018 lead coordinator

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Students receive one-on-one spiritual nurturing from campus chaplains, pastors, residence assistants, and their residence hall deans. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Enter a captPUC has multiple short-term mission trips to places like Brazil, Nicaragua, Arizona, Bangladesh, and Fiji.ion

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Our Campus Ministries team leads visits to Clearlake, Oakland, Berkeley, and other local areas each weekend helping to give back to the community. 

 

 

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Students participate in freshmen Life Groups and quarterly Week of Revival.

 

How to Build Relationships with Your Professors

Ally Romanes

One of the great things about studying at PUC is the student-to-teacher ratio. Unlike larger classes in bigger universities, PUC gives students the opportunity to get to know the faculty and build relationships with them. This allows students to not only get the help they need but build lasting and meaningful relationships. 

Faculty at PUC are well known for going above and beyond to not only help their students succeed in class but in their everyday lives as well. They care about your future and want to prepare you for the real world. Building a relationship with your professor allows them to know who you are, and that can only help when it comes time to ask them to write you a letter of recommendation! Go out of your way to get to know your professors and let them get to know you as well. That will not only change how you learn in their classes, but it will also benefit your college experience. 

Here are some tips to help you build relationships with your professors, and guess what? They’re really simple!  

Introduce Yourself

Let your professors know who you are beyond roll-call. Go up to them and introduce yourself. 

Be Respectful 

Make sure you know how to address your teacher. If they prefer being called Dr., Professor, or even their first name, make sure you address them as they have told you.

Side note: Put your phone down! (unless they ask you to use your phone for class).

Participate

You don’t need to sit in the front row or raise your hand every time a question is asked. Just show you are paying attention and do your part when it comes to group activities. Who knows, you might even get called on, so listen and be prepared. 

Write Professional Emails 

Treat being a student as a job. Don’t write an email to your professor as if you were texting a friend. Students who write professional emails stand-out to faculty. Use the subject line of the email to let make your questions or concerns clear. Some faculty teach more than one class, so use that subject line to show what you need. 

Be clear in what you need in the body of your email. If you need to schedule a meeting with your professor, have a concern with your grade, or didn’t understand something in the homework, be up front about that and be specific in what you need. 

Communicate

Take the time to talk with your professor about what you want out of the class. If you are struggling, let them know. Ask them for advice on how you can improve. 

Check Office Hours

Faculty put their office hours on the syllabus for a reason! Take advantage of their hours and get the help and advice you need to excel in your classes. Never worry about bothering them, that is what they are there for. 

 

Fall Fest Fun

This weekend was PUC’s annual Fall Festival where the Pioneers family came together to enjoy food and fun. With booths full of things to buy, things to eat, and causes to support, Fall Fest is one event everyone looks forward to.

Here are just a few of our favorite moments.

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Members of SOL Club pose for a photo before the crowds come! 

 

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These lovely ladies are taking a break by the English table! 📚 

 

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The Biology Club had the cutest succulents for purchase! 🌿  

 

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No explanation is necessary.🤣 Thanks for the laughs, REVO! 

 

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The Mabuhay Filipino Club really wowed everyone with their Tinikling which is a traditional Philippine folk dance! 

Browse through the Fall Fest album on facebook for even more! 

 

A Moment in Time: Artist Davis Perkins Exhibits at PUC

By Becky St. Clair

Always drawing as a kid, Davis Perkins doesn’t remember a time when art wasn’t a part of his life. Perkins attended the University of Oregon, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in fine arts, and he has now made art a career. He has original artwork in a permanent collection at the Smithsonian as well as in the Pentagon and has done one-man shows at the Alaska State Museum and the Smithsonian’s Air & Space Museum.

On Nov. 9, Perkins will host an opening reception and artist talk at 7 p.m. in the Rasmussen Art Gallery right here on campus. His exhibit, Landscapes: A Moment in Time, will be on display through December 8 (the gallery will be closed Nov. 23-Dec. 1 for Thanksgiving break). We caught up with Perkins and asked him a few questions to get to know him and his craft better. 

What first sparked your interest in painting?

I was always drawing as a kid. It was something for which I seemed to get a lot of “praise.” I was raised on a farm in rural Oregon and was always outside. It was during my three-year stint in the Army I really started to draw a lot, and when I got out of the service I attended college, initially studying history, but taking more and more drawing and painting classes. I had great support from my professors and they encouraged me to pursue painting seriously. I switched majors to art and began in earnest. I initially started in oil painting, and it’s what I love most to this day.

How did your career start?

While in college, I was a smokejumper (parachute firefighter), and I worked during the summer fire season. After graduation, I moved down to the Bay Area to paint during the winter, going back to Alaska to spend the summers jumping fires. It was a very seasonal lifestyle! When a professor advised me to start a series of paintings of my experiences as a smokejumper, I began jumping fires with a small sketchbook, documenting my work during the slow times. The series ended up being my senior thesis project. I had a lucky break with that final series; first, the Alaska State Museum gave me a one-man show of the work, and the next year, the Smithsonian Institution’s Air and Space Museum gave me a one-year solo exhibition of my work. The Smithsonian has three of my paintings in their permanent collection. I also have a painting in the Pentagon with the Air Force Art Collection.

How does your environment play a role in your art-making?

As you will see in the exhibit at the Rasmussen, I consider myself a traditional landscape painter. Much of my life has been spent outdoors, and the wonders of nature are what inspire me, therefore much of my work is plein air. For larger studio pieces I always work outside for reference studies.

What is one of your favorite pieces you’ve created, and why?

Hmm … that’s a tough one! I’d say some of my favorite pieces are the quick studies done on location. They often seem the freshest and most spontaneous. I am constantly attempting to not overwork a piece; I try and limit an outdoor painting session to no more than two hours. By that time, the light has changed significantly. I will often start a painting in the morning and move on to another in the afternoon. If there’s more work that remains, I can return the next day.

Tell us about your studio. What kind of space have you created in order to be comfortable expressing yourself?

I’ve got a great studio! It’s located in downtown San Rafael and is part of a complex called The ArtWorks Downtown. There are about 35 studios in the building and it is a wonderful complex in which I have many good friends. I have a high ceiling studio with a skylight, as well as good artificial lights. I’ve been in ArtWorks Downtown for about 15 years. Come visit anytime!

What’s something you still want to learn about art-making, and what are you doing to acquire that knowledge?

A good question! I am obviously still learning and it is an ongoing ambition, but I’m focusing on the study of color primarily. For the past three years, I have been on the faculty of the annual Plein Air convention. The four-day convention attracts painters from all over the world, and individuals give wonderful lectures and demonstrations. I gain a great deal from attending these lectures and learning from some of the world’s top artists. I also try and take advantage of living in the Bay Area and travel to museums here as often as I can. We are so fortunate to have access to the de Young, the Oakland Museum, and others; they have wonderful collections!

large-Perkins_Doc's PondWhat makes oil painting different from other kinds of painting?

What is delightful about oil painting is the ability to alter your work: You simply wipe it off! Often when I’m painting a cloud, for example, I will decide to start again. During the process of wiping off the paint, a new shape will emerge that I like and will develop. I especially like the ability to glaze over the dried paint with a translucent layer of color. It’s a technique used by oil painters for hundreds of years. As I mentioned, I am constantly exploring and reading about mixing color. It is an ongoing process!

How do you start a new piece? 

A large white canvas staring you in the face can be intimidating. So I always start a painting with a thin wash, usually in an earth color. I then use a little darker, thin paint to start developing the composition. This is really the most fun time to paint; you’re exploring, wiping out, redrawing with thin paint. You can’t screw it up! I then start to develop the basic values–light and dark. When I’m satisfied I’m on to something, I’ll start applying heavier layers of paint. Then it’s, “Fingers crossed!” Ha!

Who is another artist you admire, and why?

I would have to say Richard Schmid is one of my greatest inspirations. He is nothing less than a National Treasure. I have had the pleasure of meeting him, and I own all of his books. He’s been an inspiration to hundreds of young artists.

 

Faces of PUC: Dale Withers

Dale Withers has worked at PUC for 35 years and currently holds the title of director of facilities management. But Dale is a lot more than just the director, Dale is a PUCite through and through. He honestly just might know everything there is to know about PUC! Did you know under the PUC campus sits a bunch of secret tunnels? He does! And I can guarantee he’s been in all of them.

We asked Dale to answer a few questions so we can get better acquainted with him.

What brought you to PUC? How/Why did you decide to work here?  

Was working for Dwight Shogren in Texas before he came to PUC. He called me a few months later telling me he needed me at PUC. I wanted out of Texas so bad I never even asked about the benefit package, just asked what day I needed to be there!

 

What is the best thing about being a part of the Pioneers family? 

Working with students and getting to help people.

 

Where is your favorite place to eat in the Valley and why?  

Haciendas in Cloverdale, because it’s not in the busy Napa Valley so it’s quiet like restaurants used to be.

 

What is something you can do/want to do that might be surprising for people to learn?  

Some days I wonder if I am actually making a difference but then someone brightens my day with a compliment.

 

What is one song you’re listening to on repeat lately?   

Sunshine on my Shoulders.

 

Who is someone you admire and why?  

My crew because they are my feet and legs. Without them I could not get what we as a team get done here at Facilities. I am blessed to have good people that work for me and care deeply about this institution. And as an added bonus they know how to laugh, which makes for happy times.

 

Finish this sentence: On Sunday mornings you can find me …

Working mostly lately. Hopefully we can get back to Kayaking and cabin trips again soon!

 

Transfer to PUC, Today!

PUC is a vibrant and Christ-centered community full of warm and welcoming members of the Pioneers family. Here you will be given the opportunity and resources to discover and prepare for your calling. No matter your interests, there is definitely a place for you on our beautiful campus. We accept transfer students at any point in their program, so don’t worry about completing a certain number of credits before considering the move. We would be thrilled to have you join our Pioneers family!

We know transferring colleges can be overwhelming and even scary. Our goal is to make the process easier from start to finish.

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We have a dedicated counselor in the Admissions office to help students through the transfer process. Kharolynn Pascual Smith is here to help you every step of the way. Email kharolynn@puc.edu or call (800) 862-7080, option 2 to talk with her now. Get to know a little about Kharolynn!

 

 

 

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Once you’ve been accepted, PUC will complete a degree evaluation of your transcripts, which you will need before you register for classes. If you have questions about how your credits have been applied, contact the Records office at records@puc.edu or (707) 965-6673.

 

 

 
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Your personal spiritual journey should never take a back seat. At PUC, the college chaplain, Kent Rufo, is always available for counsel or even a quick prayer. Connect with him through email at Krufo@puc.edu.

 

 

 

 

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You will be assigned an academic advisor in the program you’re studying. This professor knows the ins and outs of your major and works with you to foster academic, spiritual, and personal growth. Your advisor will need to approve your class schedule each quarter, making sure you stay on track to complete your degree!

 

 
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College can be challenging, but at PUC, we have great resources in place to help students succeed. The Teaching & Learning Center offers tutoring and advising services while the Career & Counseling Center has a career counselor who can give you a career test and one-on-one help with career counseling.

 

 
Well, what are you waiting for? Apply to PUC now!

Questions about the application process for transfer students? Call (800) 862-7080, option 2 or email admissions@puc.edu to get connected with an admissions counselor to learn more. We’re ready to help you discover your calling and God’s plan for your life, every step of the way.