Five Tips for Using PUC’s Library

By Allison Fox, access services librarian

I’ve spent most of my life in libraries. My mom was the librarian at my elementary school, and summers were divided between the swimming pool and the library. As a result of these experiences, libraries have always seemed like a second home to me, which is probably what led to my becoming a librarian! You don’t have to become a librarian, but I hope you will love the library as much as I do! Or at least a little bit. Being comfortable in and with the library will contribute greatly to your academic, and (dare I say), social, success. To that end, here are five tips for using the library.

1. Make yourself at home
As I’ve just implied, a library should feel like a second home. The library has a variety of different sorts of spaces so figure out which one works best for the goal you’re attempting to reach. If you need to work in a group and engage in “lively” discussion, the main floor has an open study space and a couple of rooms to reserve. If you’re seeking quiet and solitude, the top and basement levels have many study carrels where you can focus on your work. There’s also a group viewing room on the bottom level where you can watch VHS tapes on a vintage TV (or DVDs, or streaming TV through a projector), or just gather as a group. There are multiple spaces for different kinds of work and you should keep all these options in mind when planning your schedule.

However, while we librarians want you to feel comfortable here, we also want you to pick up after yourself as you (hopefully) do at home. You are allowed to eat in the library, so please do us the courtesy of throwing away any bottles or food containers. Don’t be the person who finds out what an angry librarian looks like. 🙃

2. Make use of resources
I’ve already talked about the spaces the library offers, but wait, there’s more! Printing in the library is free. We have color as well as black and white printers, available for all your academic needs. There are also laptops to check out if you don’t own one, or if yours has recently experienced any sort of meltdown, or if you just need to use the lockdown browser to take a quiz. If you’re having trouble finding an article or book (or refining a topic, or finding one at all!) there is a librarian specifically on call to help from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., every day during the week, and on Fridays from 8 a.m. to p.m. and on Sundays from 1 to 6 p.m. We offer books on every possible topic, so if you’d like to take up knitting or cook an elaborate mid-century meal, we have a book for that, although unfortunately, we can’t provide you the spare time required for such undertakings.

3. Ask questions
One of the most important things you will learn about using the library is that no question is too small or large. If at any point during your research you find yourself lost, please find a librarian to talk to! There is no reason for you to struggle through the process by yourself, and we librarians are both able and willing. We librarians are a voraciously intellectually curious lot, so it’s fun for us to help you solve your dilemmas, be they tracking down a specific article, beginning an exploratory search of a broad topic, or refining a research inquiry. We’re also happy to tell you where the bathrooms are (we have them on each floor!) or help you find a book on the shelf. We welcome all (primarily academic) questions, from the straightforward and simple to the difficult and complex.

4. Be patient
While we are always happy to help you and answer questions, it is important to remember that research can be a long process which will require persistence and patience. It will always require a certain amount of reading and sifting through things, and it’s a process that will demand increasing amounts of your attention. As librarians, we want to make the process of finding these things as painless as possible, and give you methods that will continue to improve what and how much you find. It’s always going to take a certain amount of time, and the further you get into your discipline the more complex your research will be, so it’s important to accept the necessity of giving it your full attention.

Additionally, we librarians are very busy. We all have responsibilities like teaching classes, choosing books and other resources for the library, and a variety of other things like cataloging materials, processing archival collections, maintaining systems, and information literacy assessment. Therefore, if we are not immediately available to help you, please bear with us. We will cheerfully help you once we’re back from teaching or off the phone or finished with helping another student.

5. Get to know the librarians
I keep talking about the librarians so it may seem repetitive to advise getting to know us. However, I stand by it! If you know us you will feel comfortable asking questions, and your Academic struggles will be lessened greatly. We are also completely awesome! Patrick Benner is the library director, and he is the guru of all things technological. He also knows an awful lot about computer history and science fiction. Jason St. Clair is our cataloger, which means he makes sure all materials are in the library catalog so they can be found on the shelves. He is a musician and also reads a lot of sci-fi. Katy Van Arsdale is the special collections librarian and archivist, which means she maintains PUC’s history and deals with SDA scholarship. She wears fabulous nail polish and knows a lot about movies. And I’m Allison Fox, access services librarian—I deal with circulation and do a lot of instruction. I’m obsessed with sentence structure and argument construction, and pop culture.

I hope this gives you some insight into using the PUC library! And of course, all you have to do to find out more is come in and ask.

A Conversation with Freddy Whiteside, Director of Student Financial Services

Freddy Whiteside has been serving Pacific Union College students in the office of student financial services for eight years, and in February of this year, he stepped into his new role as director. “The best part of what I do,” he says, “is interacting with the students and finding additional financial aid options for them whenever I can.”

One of the most common questions Freddy hears from students and their families is, “Can I afford a private school?” This is, obviously, a growing concern in the U.S., and Freddy’s job is to ensure the answer to that question in reference to PUC is a resounding, “Yes!”

What is one piece of financial aid advice you would give all high school students?

Treat your GPA like it’s money because it is.

What do you think is the most underutilized financial aid resource?

Without question, it’s contacting businesses directly about private scholarships. Most people don’t realize this is an option, but it absolutely is!

What’s something about financial aid at PUC people might be surprised to learn?

Every single student who attends PUC qualifies for financial aidthis means 100 percent of the student body qualifies for financial aid!

What are some of the most important deadlines when it comes to applying for student scholarships or financial aid?

March 2 is the Cal Grant deadline. You must have your FAFSA and the GPA verification form done by this date.

How can I work out a payment plan?

PUC has a nine-month payment plan and it runs from September to May. We also have a twelve-month payment plan which starts in June, before school starts, and goes through to May. Arrangements for these plans can be made with our office.

Is the investment in college is worth it?

Take a moment to consider this: The difference between a high school diploma and a college degree is now $1.5 million in earning potential.

What kind of campus or local jobs are available for me to make money to help with tuition?

PUC currently employs hundreds of students in various departments across campus. In these roles, students have the opportunity to earn money that can go directly to their student account. Additionally, there are various jobs available in the surrounding valley that are a perfect fit for college student schedules, if an off-campus job is preferred. The student employment office can answer questions about these options. (Editor’s note: Visit the Student Employment page on our website or email stuemployment@puc.edu for more information)

How do I apply for financial aid?

Students can apply for financial aid by visiting fafsa.gov in addition to visiting puc.edu/scholarships, where they can find all the forms they’ll need to apply directly to PUC for aid. I would also encourage students to contact their local church and conference regarding scholarships.

How much access to my financial records do my parents have?

Parents have no access to their student’s financial records without consent. Students are required to fill out a consent form which allows other individuals (such as parents or grandparents) to view their financial aid.

What if I want to study abroad while I’m here? How does that affect my financial aid status?

If a student decides they want to study abroad, they would still qualify for financial aid. It does not affect their aid status at all, so long as they follow the outlined steps to communicate with the appropriate departments about their plans.

What happens if my financial situation changes mid-year?

If this happens, we have the ability to revise a student’s FAFSA based on their current financial situation. They could potentially qualify for additional financial aid, based on the circumstances.

Does PUC offer renewable scholarships?

Yes, PUC has many four-year guaranteed scholarships. Please check out the website at puc.edu/scholarships for a list of available renewable scholarships.

What is the #1 website you would recommend to parents who might be overwhelmed by the financial aid process or are going through it for the first time?

I actually have three websites I like to recommend: #1 studentloans.gov: This is a government website that focuses on student loan debt, however, they have a lot of great resources about paying for college. #2 finaid.org: They cover everything from student loans, scholarships, grants and more. They also have advice on ways to save for college. #3 fastweb.com: This is a website for scholarships, internships, and career advice.

To connect with Freddy and his team of financial counselors to discuss your financial situation, email studentfinance@puc.edu or call (800) 862-7080, option 1.

#FacultyFriday: Meet Tara Hargrove

The holy hill called Tara Hargrove, and she answered! Okay, so maybe the voice she heard was God and not the mountain, but we are so happy, either way, that Professor Hargrove has joined the faculty in the department of communication. Read on to learn a bit more about her, and stop by her office in Irwin Hall to say hello.

Name: Tara Hargrove
Title: Associate Professor of Communication & Basic Course Director
Email: thargrove@puc.edu
Faculty since: 2018

Fall Quarter Classes: Three sections of Intro to Communication (COMM 105)

Education: M.A. in communication studies, Colorado State University

What brought you here to PUC?

I grew up in Colorado so I love mountains but I’ve always been drawn to the beach, as well. So the location of PUC—being on a mountain and so close to the ocean—was a big draw. But mostly I prayed and prayed for God’s leading, and He brought me here.

Before God called you to these California mountains, where were you and what were you doing?

I was actually most recently at Southern Adventist University, where I taught for the past nine years. This past year I taught strictly online for them, and I currently adjunct teach online for them a film evaluation class and a course on communication and public speaking. I was also the basic course director and the executive director for Studio 4109 which is a live comedy sketch program students put on.

Tell us how you got into teaching.

I tell a story my first day of speech class about how I was so terrified of public speaking when I first was contemplating college that I actually decided not to go to college just because of that class. I had a friend who took me skydiving and reminded me there are a lot of things in life we fear at first but if we push ourselves it can be fun and rewarding. I loved the feeling of overcoming my fear, so I took public speaking and found it was actually exciting to get up and share my opinions and ideas and people actually listened. Now I love helping others overcome their fears, and watching them face something challenging and succeed.

What has surprised you about your new home?

Not that we didn’t expect this, but everyone has been so very welcoming. We have been so blessed by this community.

So, when you’re not managing classes and teaching and meeting with students, where will you be?

I, of course, enjoy spending time with my husband and kids. We love going to the beach, tide-pooling, camping, and hiking. We are also Broncos and Rockies fans so we enjoy going to games when we can.

Okay, one last thing: What’s something people may be surprised to learn about you?

I’d love to live on a boat or in a van. Really!

Kenzie Hardy, Your SA President!

Kenzie Hardy is what is commonly known as a “super senior.” This is her fifth and final year at PUC, having spent one of those years as a student missionary in Madagascar. She will graduate in June with two degrees: A Bachelor of Business Administration with an emphasis in international business, and a Bachelor of Science degree in global development studies with a business emphasis.

She considers Roseville, Calif., to be home, and completed her high school years at Pine Hills Adventist Academy in Auburn. While there, she served as student association treasurer, was a member of the honor society, and helped out during Week of Prayer. When it came time to decide on a college, Kenzie says, “PUC was the college I felt was most responsive and provided the best answers to the questions I had.” Her path was clear: She chose PUC.

This year, Kenzie is not only finishing up her college career, but she’s also serving her fellow students as their student association president. We caught up with her between classes and meetings so we could get to know her a little better. Introducing: Kenzie Hardy, your Student Association president!

When did you first get that spark of interest in leadership?

I unofficially participated in SOL club (the Student Organization of Latinos) my freshman year, attending and offering help during some events. But I became a life group leader as a sophomore. As a freshman, I had a great leader but knew of others that didn’t have the same experience. I saw the benefits of continuing the program but also saw an opportunity to be part of changing those things that weren’t working as well.

What was your major platform while running for SA president?

The phrase on the campaign materials was “let’s talk” and instead of leaving it as a printed poster, I set up a booth in the cafeteria. The booth provided an opportunity for students to share concerns, ideas, and to get to meet me and ask questions. I really emphasized the experience and knowledge gathered after several years here.  

How did it feel to go through your campaign—and win?

The elections process felt surreal, and the day it was announced even moreso. To this day I’ll have random and sudden realizations of the huge responsibility I have been entrusted with. It is mostly humbling to have received support that put me in this office and continues.

Tell us your leadership philosophy.

I truly think individuals are motivated to thrive in any position if the environment is designed to allow individuals to grow. Also, I really take into heart the idea of leading by example, instead of demanding or requiring things I wouldn’t of myself.

What do you feel is one of your most important roles/duties as president?

I think being visible, accessible, and present to students. Also, making sure information is being collected and transmitted between the student body and college administration.

What’s the best way for students to have their voices/concerns heard by the student leaders on campus?

There are several student leadership bodies that are empowered to make changes, but it all starts with communication. Finding out who represents them in the Student Senate, SA, and other committees is the first step. I’d like to encourage anyone with concerns to actually address them to someone—any leader can take it to the appropriate channels. The invitation also goes to those entrusted with listening, to make sure they are getting to those channels or individuals who can make changes.

Kenzie and the SA team.

What’s the best class you’ve taken at PUC thus far, and why?

My freshman year I took Psych 121 (General Psychology) and at that time it was taught by Dr. Charlene Bainum. The class was fascinating and to this day, I still reference some of the concepts learned in that class almost daily.

Where are your favorite study spots?

If I really need to focus and minimize distractions I like to go to the basement laundry room in Andre. I usually go off-campus on a Sunday or during finals week, and I like Brasswood’s coffee shop.

What’s something about PUC you learned after being here a while?

This is something I learned during my junior year, I think everyone should know: There is a waived fee for credit overload if you’re a senior who has taken 16 credits/quarter since freshman year.

Tell me about a time you stepped out of your comfort zone and how it’s benefitted you.

I worked as the programming coordinator at Pine Springs Ranch this past summer, and the position was somewhat out of my comfort zone. Creating programs for different purposes (comedy plays, activities with spiritual messages, interactive stations with a theme, etc.) and overseeing their development from start to finish was not something I had experience doing. It was definitely a summer of growth, I developed the skill of quick problem-solving.

Kenzie and her SM family.

Tell us about a positive role model in your life.

I have a very special place in my heart for Dr. Gideon Petersen, president at Université Adventiste Zurcher in Madagascar, and his wife, Pam. During my time as a student missionary they cared for me and I experienced firsthand their servant leadership style, their passion for helping others, and their humble lifestyle. We had candid conversations about various topics and they are part of the reason I am completing the major I am.

Where and when can students find you if they want to chat about life at PUC and voice their opinions?

In between classes, meetings, and other such events, my default location is my office in the Campus Center. Whenever I am in here, unless I’m having a meeting, I keep the door open and everyone is welcome to come chat. I also love writing emails, so I am always checking my email and answer relatively fast.

What’s your favorite Bible verse, and why?

One of them is Luke 1:45; “Blessed is she who has believed that the Lord would fulfill His promises to her!” I love that this verse specifically says “she” and the benefit of trusting in God and His faithfulness is feeling happy, secure, and blessed.

Five Tips for Finding Money to Pay for College

Does thinking about how you’re going to pay for college make you feel overwhelmed? This blog post is for you!

When looking at potential colleges, seeing the overall cost probably makes you want to give up. It’s completely understandable, but keep in mind nobody pays that sticker price. This is where grants, scholarships, and loans come in.

Scholarships can substantially lower the price families pay for a college education, and the great part about them is it’s money you don’t have to pay back. PUC offers many scholarships that can help, but the reality is we can’t always provide as much financial aid as some students and families might need. Don’t worry, though! It’s estimated there is close to $50 billion in grants and scholarship money available in just the United States alone, so if you haven’t already, now is the time to start your scholarship search.

Start Looking Online

A lot of students worry they won’t receive any scholarships if they don’t have a 4.0 GPA. This simply isn’t true! Scholarships aren’t just for students with a high GPA. There are non-academic scholarships available based on your major of interest, leadership involvement, extracurricular activities, community service, and more. There are even some fun scholarships, such as the Create-a-Greeting Card scholarship (worth $10,000), for which applicants submit a design for a greeting card; the Vegetarian Resource Group scholarship (worth $10,000), for which applicants need to have demonstrated “compassion, courage, and a strong commitment to promoting a peaceful world through a vegetarian diet/lifestyle”; and the Tall Clubs International, Inc. scholarship (worth $1,000), which is available to male applicants at least 6’2” and female applicants at least  5’10” and who write an essay on the subject of “What Being Tall Means to Me.” Perhaps the most famous college scholarship is the Stuck at Prom scholarship (worth $10,000), for which students compete by making outfits entirely out of Duck brand duct tape to wear to prom.

These sites are a great starting point for your college scholarship search:

  • Fastweb: Fastweb is considered to be the premier scholarship website with over 1.5 million scholarships worth over $3 billion.
  • Niche: This website lists over 3.2 million scholarships and also allows you to create a profile to be personally matched to scholarships you may be eligible for.
  • Unigo: This website lists over 3.6 million scholarships.

Also, check out our extensive list of scholarship sites at puc.edu/outsidescholarships.

Think Locally Too

Take a look around your community for scholarship opportunitiesyou might be surprised at what you find in your area. Your local Rotary Club or Kiwanis International Club may offer college scholarships, as could your chamber of commerce. Other businesses and community groups could provide college scholarships as well. Your high school guidance counselor may also have ideas of where you can look nearby for scholarships. One big advantage of applying for local scholarships is there’s far less competition for them than there are for state or national scholarshipsyou have a greater chance at receiving them! Remember to check with your church too.

Write One Good Essay

Obviously, you’re going to need to write more than just one essay when applying for scholarships, but you can probably use certain parts of an essay more than once. Have the basicsyour career goals, personal statement, and academic career thus farperfected, as you will likely use that information repeatedly. These essays could determine whether or not you’re awarded a great deal of money, so it’s worth spending time on them to make sure you present yourself well.

Put the Time In

The internet can be both a blessing and a curse. There’s a wealth of information available right at your fingertips, but there are also countless distractions that can quickly take you down a rabbit hole. Before you know it, you’ve spent two hours taking BuzzFeed quizzes and not doing what you intended to do. Treat applying for college scholarships as though it was your job try spending an hour each day or at least several hours a week searching and applying for scholarships. The time you put in could make all the difference in receiving thousands of dollars!

Don’t Forget About the FAFSA

One of the most important things you can do is to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at fafsa.gov. The FAFSA is a form you will submit each year that determines your eligibility for student financial aid. Starting October 1, 2018, you can submit your FAFSA and have your information sent to the 10 colleges you’re interested in. Submit your FAFSA as soon as possible since some aid is awarded on a first-come, first served basis. To have your FAFSA sent to PUC, make sure you include PUC’s school codeit’s 001258.

Filling out the FAFSA also potentially qualifies you for a Pell Grant, which is a subsidy from the U.S. federal government, and is something you don’t have to pay back. Amounts can change each year, but for the 2018-2019 award year, the maximum Pell Grant award is $6,095.

According to a study by NerdWallet, in 2014 U.S. high school graduates left a whopping $2.9 billion in free federal grant money on the table just by not completing the FAFSA, which made them ineligible for a Pell Grant. In our great state of California, over 100,000 seniors could have potentially qualified for Pell Grants if they had filed their FAFSA, but as a result, they lost $396,401,205. Are you seeing how critical it can be for you to take the time to fill out the FAFSA yet?

There’s a lot to keep track of when applying for scholarships and other financial aid. At PUC, we have a team of financial aid counselors ready to help if you have questions about scholarships and how to make college affordable for your family. Call (800) 862-7080, option 1 or email studentfinance@puc.edu to get connected with a counselor today.

#FacultyFriday: Meet William Logan

Meet William “Willy” Logan, PUC’s newest professor in the department of history. Willy’s interest in technology through history pairs well with his understanding of engineering to bring a unique perspective to the history courses he will be teaching here at PUC. Welcome to the hill, Willy!

Name: William “Willy” Logan
Title: Assistant Professor of History
Email: wlogan@puc.edu
Faculty since: 2018

Fall Quarter Classes: History of the United States II; Medieval Europe; Seminar in European History (this quarter’s topic: Technology in Europe from the Middle Ages to the 20th Century).

Education: B.S. in engineering (concentration in mechanical engineering), Walla Walla University; Ph.D. in history of technology from Auburn University

You just arrived at PUC in August. What were you doing before that?

I was actually in Walla Walla, doing some adjunct teaching at the university for its history, technology, and engineering departments. I was also serving as a freshman mentor at the university, and substitute teaching for the public school district there. Before Walla Walla, I had been working for a study abroad program in Jaipur, in western India.

So what brought you to PUC?

I decided to come teach here because I wanted to serve a diverse, inclusive student population and be able to more fully integrate faith and teaching than I could at a secular institution.

What inspired you to become a teacher in the first place?

As should be obvious from my mismatched degrees, I didn’t always intend to become a historian. I had always loved history, but I wanted to be an engineer and work for NASA or an aerospace firm, and then maybe someday down the road make the transition to writing books about history. It was late in my college career that it occurred to me that I would be happier if I skipped the middle step and went straight to grad school to study for a Ph.D. in history.

As a newbie to PUC, tell us something that has surprised you about this place.

I heard about PUC all my life because my mom and several uncles are alumni, but nobody ever told me the college is on top of a mountain. When I came here to interview, I got to the Napa Valley after dark because my flight was delayed. I was surprised when Deer Park Road started going up and up and up, and I wondered: Where am I going?! That was pretty surprising!

What are some of your hobbies and pastimes?

I like hiking, riding my bike, cooking, exploring cities, sketching, and taking pictures with some antique film cameras I own.

All right, what is something others may be surprised to learn about you?

I spent three years of my life in India, and I speak Hindi.

Meet Dean Hernan Granados

When you arrive at PUC and begin exploring your new home away from home, you’ll likely want to know just who is in charge of your living space. We’ve made that easy for you! Over the next few weeks, we’ll be featuring all of our residence hall deans here on the blog so you can get to know them all. And if you need to contact them, feel free to reach out!

Name: Hernan Granados
Dean of: Newton Hall
Phone: (707) 965-7409
Email: hgranados@puc.edu
Dean since: 2006

Have you always been a dean?

No, actually; before coming to PUC, I was serving as a pastor.

What does a typical day at the residence hall look like for you?

There are no typical days. Every day is different, and that is what I love about my job.

What about your work is the most rewarding to you?

Definitely seeing the men grow as people and into gentlemen.

When you’re not deaning, how do you enjoy occupying your time?

I really like being outside. Either on the water in my boat or on the green, golfing.

What do you love most about PUC?

Well, considering the outdoors is my favorite place to be, it has to be the mountains and the clear air here.

So when you were a kid, did you want to be a pastor and a dean?

No; I actually dreamed of becoming an architect, but God led me in a different direction.

What did you study in college, then?

I studied theology. When I graduated, I went to work for the Southern California Conference.

In your line of work, you often serve as a mentor to others. Tell me about a mentor who has been invaluable to you.

Jim Boyd, a former dean here at PUC who just retired this year. He respects people and is willing to help others. He truly cares for people.

One last personal question: What’s one of your favorite movies, and why?

Dead Poets Society is hands-down my favorite movie. I love how Robin Williams’ character really cares about his students. He challenges them and also is there for them when they need him the most, helping the young people to think outside the box and guiding them when they need it. Most of all, I enjoy how he spends time with them and shows them how much he cares for them not only as students but as individuals.